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County:Bourbon   (28 results)

Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
1859
This claim was submitted by Blake Little on behalf of J. H. Little & Company for supplies furnished to the territorial militia on or about August 22, 1856. Mr. Little's store was in Bourbon County. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Damage claims; J. H. Little & Company; Little, Blake; Militia; Strickler, Hiram Jackson

Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson

Letter, Sene Campbell to [Capt. James] Montgomery
January 4, 1859
Sene Campbell, writing from Fort Scott, K. T. to Capt. James Montgomery, expressed her anger at Montgomery for his roll in the killing of John Little. Little was killed on December 16, 1858, at Fort Scott by a group of free state supporters led by Montgomery who had entered the town to free Benjamin Rice, a free state advocate being held prisoner. Campbell was Little's fiance.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Campbell, Sene; Casualties; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Jayhawking; Little, J. H.; Little, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violence; Violent deaths; Women

Authors: Campbell, Sene

Residents on the Little Osage
c. 1857
This brief report describes the settlers along the Little Osage River, stating that it is occupied mostly by proslavery settlers; there are only three or four free state residents. The report mentions Enoch Osbourne (presumably a free state settler) who was driven from his land, and also notes that there is a need for free state men on this creek.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Free state settlers; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers

Authors: Campbell, Sene

Letter, H. P. A. Smith to General [James W. Denver]
May 16, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported that conditions were peaceful in the southeast section of the territory. Smith stated that he had accompanied a group of dragoons on an unsuccessful mission to find and arrest James Montgomery and other free state supporters who allegedly had engaged in violent activities in the area. Smith commented that in his view the "ultra Pro Slavery party" was partly responsible for the unrest in southeast Kansas Territory, but he also believed that "moderate free state" supporters should act to stop the violence.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; Smith, H. P. A.; United States. Army; Violence

Authors: Smith, H. P. A.

Letter, J. Williams to Governor [James W.] Denver
May 16, 1858
Williams, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, complained about the activities of James Montgomery and "his murderers & robbers" in Bourbon County. Williams, who displayed moderate views, condemned both proslavery and free state violence and maintained that the citizens of Bourbon County simply wanted to live in peace.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Griffith, William Riley; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Violence; Williams, J.

Authors: Williams, J.

Letter, Th. [Thomas] J. Wood, Capt. Cavalry, Comdg. to Govr. J. W. Denver
May 16, 1858
Captain Thomas J. Wood, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on the efforts of the U.S. Army to maintain order in southeast Kansas Territory. Capt. Wood stated that he planned to remove all troops from Fort Scott except a section of artillery and he suggested that there was no need to keep any troops in the area. The Marais des Cygnes massacre took place in Linn County on May 19, 1858, three days after Wood wrote this letter.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Military; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Army; Wood, Thomas J.

Authors: Wood, Thomas J.

Letter, Geo. W. Clarke to Saml. J. Jones
June 2, 1858
George W. Clarke, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Samuel J. Jones (Sheriff Jones), described a May 30, 1858 incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declared that he was innocent of the charges and viewed Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also described the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamelton, Charles A.; Jayhawkers; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; United States. Army; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas

Authors: Clarke, George W.

Letter, H. P. A. Smith to Jas. W. Denver
June 3, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on events of May 30, 1858 involving Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker's attempt to arrest George W. Clarke on charges that Clarke participated in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Smith questioned Walker's authority to arrest Clarke, observing that Walker's arrest warrant had been issued by a justice of the peace from a township, Mapleton, that did not yet exist. Smith commented on the general state of unrest in the area and declared that the "County is in fact in open rebellion . . . . complete anarchy prevails." He encouraged Governor Denver to come to Fort Scott to assess the situation for himself and to help restore order.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Smith, H. P. A.; Walker, Samuel Douglas

Authors: Smith, H. P. A.

Letter, John Vansickle and John Peters to Dear Sir
March 3, 1858
John Vansickle and John Peters wrote from Bourbon County regarding their recent experiences in Kansas Territory. Vansickle discussed the "Kansas trubels" [sic] and described the chaotic situation of the area, full of armed free state and proslavery men acting in the name of politics but stealing horses and robbing homes. He added that men were not safe at home, though he intended to stay in K.T. until forced out. Vansickle also referred to a coming March 9 election which would select delegated to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Elections; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Militia; Skirmishing; Vansickle, John H.; Weather

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Father and Mother
July 11, 1858
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County to his Father and Mother outside Kansas Territory. Vansickle spoke of a recent trip to Iowa, though it was short because he was anxious to return home. He added that grain crops in the area were doing the best he had ever seen. Vansickle also told his parents of his marriage three days earlier to Martha Stevenson, and invited them both for a visit, as the current climate of "perfect peas" [sic, peace] made the journey a safer one.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Crops; Daily life; Farmers; Marriage; Vansickle, John H.

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
September 1, 1858
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County to the recipient (most likely a family member) regarding his business selling goods. Money was scarce for him, though the crops were faring well. Vansickle included the current prices for various commodities and told of his plans to travel East the following spring. He expressed concern that he had not heard from many of his friends since moving to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Business enterprises; Crops; Daily life; Economic conditions; Merchants; Prices; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Residents on Marmiton Creek
c. 1857
This document lists the names and origins of the residents of Marmiton (Marmaton) Creek, including whether each settler was free state, pro slavery, or noncommittal. The first page lists the total number of settlers and also includes a brief description of the area.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Marmaton, Kansas Territory; Marmiton Creek; Proslavery settlers

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
December 11, 1858
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County regarding his business selling goods, which was "on the gaining hand" since he was the only merchant from the "river clear to the state line." There had been three inches of snow, he said, but the temperature had not yet reached zero. Vansickle again invited the recipient of this letter to visit him in the spring.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Business enterprises; Merchandise; Merchants; Prices; Vansickle, John H.; Weather; Xenia, Kansas Territory

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Father
December 28, 1858
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County, Kansas Territory, to his father back East. Vansickle advised him not to travel to the Territory to visit him in light of recent events. Vansickle referred to the release of Benjamin Rice by James Montgomery and a band of free state men. Rice had been in a Fort Scott prison for killing a proslavery man. Shortly thereafter, according to Vansickle, John Brown entered Missouri, freed slaves and stole property. He also told his father that the newspapers communicated little of the story, as victims of crimes and anyone whose opinion was published would be subject to mob violence.

Keywords: Battles; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little, J. H.; Newspapers; Rice, Benjamin; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
February 4, 1859
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County responding to his recipient's previous letter. Vansickle seemed hopeful, as he saw there was a "prospect of peace" in his part of the country, and his business and crops were successful. He also commented on James Montgomery and John Brown, criticizing that they "free more horses than negros," calling them scoundrels and warning his recipient to "never vindicate thare [their] cause." Vansickle added that he would assist the recipient in coming to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Land claims; Merchants; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, John Vansickle to Sir
February 20, 1860
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County about building his new home, the development of new roads in his area, and preparations for the recipient's coming visit. Vansickle also related a story in which a former Jayhawker was caught stealing a horse and "cabeled to a Post Oak Lim between heven and Erth. . .in token. . .of our Love for John Brown the People think of making Several Such Sacrifices."

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Daily life; Economic conditions; Jayhawkers; Prices; Proslavery support; Roads; Sawmills; Settlement; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, J. H. Vansickle to Sir
August 17, 1860
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County regarding the dry weather and economic conditions that were causing a mass emigration out of Kansas Territory. Settlers in Kansas during 1860 were suffering during a particularly severe drought.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Droughts; Economic conditions; Emigration and immigration; Vansickle, John H.; Weather; Xenia, Kansas Territory

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Letter, J. H. Vansickle to Dear Sir
November 27, 1860
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County regarding the current economic conditions in Kansas Territory. Vansickle stated that the weather had remained dry for almost 12 months, and that corn and other crops had become valuable commodities. He added that the ruffians and the lawless part of the community would not help themselves by working when they had the chance. Vansickle concluded by saying he had plenty of food, and he discussed land claim opportunities with the recipient.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Droughts; Economic conditions; Land acquisition; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Prices; Vansickle, John H.

Authors: Vansickle, John H.

Photograph of William Riley Griffith

Griffith was a free state supporter living in Marmaton, Bourbon County. He was a delegate to the Topeka and Wyandotte Constitutional Conventions and was on the Free-State central committee.

Keywords: Cabinet photographs; Constitutional conventions; Free state cause; Griffith, William Riley; Photographs and Illustrations; Topeka Constitution; Wyandotte Constitution

Authors: Leonard, 613 Kansas Ave., Topeka, KS.

Residents on Lost Creek, a tributary of the Little Osage
c. 1857
This document lists the names and origins of the proslavery and free state settlers that lived along Lost Creek, on the north edge of Bourbon County. The first page details information about specific families in the area and states that Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, made arrangements to aid those settlers who are listed as being "in distress."

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Lost Creek, Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers

Authors: Leonard, 613 Kansas Ave., Topeka, KS.

Territorial Census, 1855, District 6
January-February, 1855
This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There is a summary of voters in the 6th district at the end of the enumeration. For District Six the place of election was the house of H. T. Wilson, at Fort Scott. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Sixth District follows: "Commencing on the Missouri State line, in Little Osage River; thence up the same to the line of the reserve of the New York Indians, or to the nearest point thereto; thence to and by the north line of said reserve to the Neosho River, and up said southern line of the Territory; thence by the southern and eastern lines of said Territory to the place of beginning."

Keywords: Barbee, William; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Census; Wilson, H. T.

Authors: Barbee, William

Election Returns and Ballots, Fort Scott Precinct, Bourbon County, Special Election, December 21, 1857 on the Lecompton Constitution with or without slavery
December 21, 1857
Election returns and actual elections ballots cast in Fort Scott Precinct, Bourbon County, Kansas Territory during the December 21, 1857, election on ratification of the Lecompton Constitution "with slavery" or the constitution "without slavery." Because a vote "for the constitution without slavery" meant Kansans could keep the slaves they already owned, free staters refused to participate. In this election, the "constitution with slavery" won 6,226 to 569. Results in Fort Scott were 318 to 19 in favor the the "constitution with slavery." Note that the largest ballot (No. 1) was signed by J. C. Head, whose name also is listed first on the election returns for Fort Scott.

Keywords: Ballot; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Elections; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Greenwood, Daniel; Hamilton, George P.; Head, J. C.; Head, Joseph W.; Lecompton Constitution

Authors: Greenwood, Daniel ; Hamilton, George P.; Head, Joseph W.

Letter, John McCannon to Col. Jas. B. Abbott
July 24, 1858
John McCannon, who had once served as Quartermaster for the Kansas free state militia, wrote from Little Osage, Kansas Territory, to James Abbott in Lawrence. McCannon reported that peace reigned in the area in the wake of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre of the past May. Referring to the current Constitutional controversy, he proclaimed, "Lecompton can not live on the Osage", as there were not enough proslavery supporters in the area to approve it were it put to a popular vote. McCannon did not seem to be concerned that U.S. Troops had recently arrived at Fort Scott, for reasons unknown to him, as local towns thrived and crops flourished.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Coal; Crops; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Gristmills; Lebanon, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; McCannon, John; Military; Sawmills; Timber; Town development

Authors: McCannon, John

Letter, Harrison Anderson to R. J. Hinton
January 27, 1860
The elder brother of Harpers Ferry raider Jeremiah G. Anderson wrote Hinton to provide information on his brothers activities in Kansas Territory, beginning in "June or July 1857," when he settle in norther Bourbon County. J.G. Anderson was actively engaged in free-state activities in southern Kansas, including efforts to defy the bogus authority through the establishment of what was called a "Squaters court." (According to a January 29, 1860, letter--also in this folder--from another brother, John Q. Anderson of Eddyville, Iowa, brother Harrison was still living in at Little Osage, KT, and he had "frequently entertained" John Brown.)

Keywords: Abolitionists; Anderson, Jeremiah G.; Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Free state cause; Free state settlers; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Proslavery activities; Squatters

Authors: Anderson, Harrison

Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear Brother"
August 23, 1857
Writing to his brother from Barnesville (Bourbon County) on August 28, 1857, Jeremiah Goldsmith Anderson, a native of Indiana and follower of James Montgomery in southeast Kansas, described a variety of mundane matters regarding conditions in Kansas, including land claims and the construction of a steam sawmill on the river.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; County seats; Crops; Farmers; Free state settlers; Missouri; Proslavery settlers; Sawmills; Sickness (see Illness); Timber claim

Authors: Anderson, J. G.

Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear Brother"
February 17, 1858
From "Camp near Luella K.T." on February 17, 1858, J. G. Anderson wrote to his brother regarding the "considerable excitement" that had recently resulted after a free state man was robbed in Fort Scott. Two companies of "Kansas Militia" were called out to arrest the thieves, "our company under Capt. [O.P.] Bayne and the Sugar Creek company under Capt. [James] Montgomery. When they arrived at "the Fort" on the 11th "the bloody villains" had already fled to Missouri. The letter is a "typical" mix of news about the Kansas troubles, work on the claim, and pleasantries about the folks back home. [Before the end of the year, Anderson would sign on with John Brown and follow him to Harpers Ferry.]

Keywords: Anderson, Jeremiah G.; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Land claims; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Sharps rifles; Weapons (see also Guns)

Authors: Anderson, J. G.

Letter, William Hutchinson to "Dear Helen"
January 3, 1859
A resident of Lawrence and correspondent from the New York Tribune, William Hutchinson wrote his wife Helen from Mapleton, northern Bourbon County, right after the first of the year, 1859, to tell her about "the wars" in the southern part of the territory and about the activities of "Old" John Brown and his followers. Hutchinson met with the "war council," as well as with James Montgomery, advised against "rash measures," and, with Montgomery, participated in a large meeting of the citizens "to devise a plan for peace." (A note on the back of page 4, by R.J. Hinton, reads, "Copied by my wife from original. Interesting." A good number of the documents in this folder are copies--mostly handwritten.)

Keywords: Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamilton, Charles A.; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Missouri; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Paola, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers; Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus

Authors: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904

Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear brother," J. Q. Anderson
January 14, 1859
From near Lawrence, Jeremiah G. Anderson wrote about his recent call "into the service," whick took him to Fort Scott and into Missouri with "Old [John] Brown as they call him," where they liberate "ten slaves." Anderson provides some interesting details of their current action and journey, and he observed: "Brown has drawn a paralel [sic] which will be published in the Tribune."

Keywords: Anderson, Jeremiah G.; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawking; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Rice, Benjamin; Slaves; Underground railroad

Authors: Anderson, J. G.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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