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County:Franklin   (16 results)

Manuscript Volume, Items of 1856
1856
This little journal/ledger contained a five-page account of the May 24, 1856, killings on Pottawatomie Creek, apparently written by James Hanway shortly after the incident. He mentioned the five victims by name and wrote: "The settlement is plunged into a perfect commotion. A meeting of the settlers was held on the 26th and they mutually agreed to protect each other from foreign or internal foes. All men of real good sense, condemned these midnight assassinations and also the killing of men who are attending to their concerns". This was a somewhat different perspective of the situation than expressed by Hanway in his 1860 letter to James Redpath. Nevertheless, the responsibility for "all such blood tragedies" is with the pro-slave men.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Doyle, James P.; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hanway, James; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery activities; Violence; Violent deaths; Wilkinson, Allen

Authors: Hanway, James

Pamphlet," A Colony for an Indian Reserve in Kansas"
1863
This pamphlet, written by Clinton Carter Hutchinson, U.S. Indian Agent of Ottawa Creek, Franklin County, Kansas, contains a brief history of the Ottawa Indian tribe (after contact with white settlers) and describes the land allotted to them in a treaty of June 24, 1862, which opened a portion of their land reserve to public sales. The remainder of the pamphlet serves as a type of almanac, advising potential settlers of the Kansas frontier lifestyle, what provisions are available or recommended, and what types of people and professions are desirable.

Keywords: Daily life; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Indian agents; Land acquisition; Land grants; Native Americans; Natural resources; Ottawa Indians; Timber; Treaties; Weather

Authors: Hutchinson, Clinton Carter

Territorial Census, 1855, District 4
January-February, 1855
This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 4, the place of election was the house of Dr. ___Chapman. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Fourth District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, in the middle of the Santa Fe road; thence along the middle of said road to Rock Creek, near the sixty-fifth mile of said road; thence south to the line of the late Shawnee reservation ceded by the treaty of 1854; thence due east along the south line of said reservation and the north line of the existing reservations of the Sacs and Foxes, the existing reservations of the Chippewas and Ottawas and the late reservations of the Piankesaws, Weas, Peorias and Kaskaskias to the Missouri State line; thence up the Missouri State line to the place of beginning."

Keywords: Census; Donalson, C. B.; Franklin County, Kansas Territory

Authors: Donalson, C. B.

Territorial Census, 1855, District 5
January-March 1855
This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There is an index and summary at the end of the census enumeration. For District 5, the place of election was the house of Hy. Sherman, on the old John Jones improvement, on Pottawatomie Creek. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Fifth District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, at the southern boundary of the Fourth District; thence east along the same to the northwest corner of the Sac and Fox Reservation; thence due south along the western line thereof and due south to the south branch of the Neosho River, about seventy miles above the Catholic Osage Mission; thence down the said river to the north line of the reserve for New York Indians, and east along said line to the head waters of Little Osage River, or the nearest point thereto; and thence down said river to the Missouri State line, and up said line to the place of beginning."

Keywords: Barbee, William; Census; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Sherman, Hy.

Authors: Barbee, William

Testimony of S. H. Moore
November 28, 1856
This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Crops; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Moore, S. H.; National Kansas Committee; Ottawa, Kansas Territory; Postal service

Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus

Statement, C. A. Foster, Was John Brown present and participating in the masacre at Pottowatomie Creek
July 12, 1860
Signed C. A. Foster, Boston, July 12, 1860, this brief statement asserts that John Brown "was not present" at the Pottawatomie Massacre, "but that he knew that it was going to be done" and "he approved it."

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Foster, Charles A.; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Authors: Foster, Charles A.

Letter, John Brown to Orson Day Esqr.
December 14, 1855
In mid-December 1855, John Brown wrote to Orson Day (a brother in law) of White Hall, New York, from Browns Station, Kansas Territory, regarding the "Kansas War" (Wakarusa War) from which he had "just returned." The territory was, according to Brown, "now entirely in the power of the Free State men," and he continued to "believe the Missourians will give up all further hope of making Kansas a Slave State."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Browns Station, Kansas Territory; Firearms; Free state cause; Free state constitutions; Missourians; Proslavery prospects; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Topeka Constitution; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855

Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859

Letter, [John Brown, Jr.] to Dear Father [John Brown]
June 22, 1855
This rather lengthy letter from John Brown, Jr., at Brownsville, K.T., to his father, John Brown, regarding the Kansas family's current situation, physically and economically. John, Jr., provides a hand-drawn map of the family's settlement in Franklin County (he calls it "Brown Co.") just west of Osawatomie.

Keywords: Agriculture; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Crops; Farmers; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Free state settlers; Land claims; Missourians; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Ottawa Indians; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory

Authors: Brown, Jr., John

Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
November 2, 1855
In this letter from "Brownsville, Kansas Territory," John Brown made some observations about the harshness of the weather, the health of his Kansas children, their general lack of preparedness for the winter, and the farm work that needed to be accomplished. His only comment about the political situation in the territory came in closing: "I feel more, & more confident that Slavery will soon die out here; & to God be the praise."

Keywords: Agriculture; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Crops; Farmers; Free state cause; Free state settlers; Houses; Slavery; Weather

Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859

John Brown Sword
1856
The sword is believed to have been brought to Kansas Territory from Ohio by John Brown in 1856. That year, pro-slavery forces destroyed the homes of John Brown's sons in Franklin County. While leaving the state, the Brown family camped at the home of Otis Potter, near Lawrence. In gratitude, the Browns presented this sword to Potter.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Free state cause; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Objects; Ohio; Potter, Otis; Swords and daggers; Weapons (see also Guns)

Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859

Letter, John T. Jones to Mr. John Brown
October 13, 1857
"Ottawa Jones," a mixed-blood Indian who lived on Ottawa Creek in Franklin Co., wrote John Brown on October 13, 1857, regarding a financial claim/account that he was trying unsuccessfully to collect on for his friend, Brown. Jones closed by asking God to bless and reward Brown in his struggle "to bring about liberty for all men."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Finance; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Ottawa Creek, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879

Authors: Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy)

Letter, Your Affectionate Husband & Father [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
April 7, 1856
From "Brown's Station" in the southeastern corner of Franklin County, K.T., Brown wrote the family about a variety of matters, including family finances/business interests and, as usual, his faith in God ("trust us to the care of 'Him who feeds the young Ravens when they cry'"). Brown also mentioned the house they were building for Orson Day, his brother in law, and the "rumors" of what was to come in the political arena. "For one I have no desire (all things considered) to have the Slave Power cease from its acts of aggression. 'Their foot shall slide in due time.'"

Keywords: Bleeding Kansas; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Watson, 1835-1859; Day, Orson; Free state activities; Free state cause; Proslavery activities; Slave power; Thompson, Ruth (Brown); United States. District Court (Kansas Territory)

Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859

Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
1859
Jared Chapman submitted this detailed claim (No. 49) for losses of property after he was forced to leave the territory "in fear of my life." Chapman lived in Franklin County. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Agricultural implements; Chapman, Jared; Damage claims; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Household equipment; Medicine; Strickler, Hiram Jackson

Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson

Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
1859
William Green Price submitted claim # 109 for the loss of goods from his home and grocery store in September, 1856 by the territorial militia. The detailed listing of items included alcoholic beverages and a variety of goods from the store. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Alcoholic beverages; Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Franklin, Kansas Territory; Groceries; Grocery trade; Militia; Price, William Green; Retail businesses; Strickler, Hiram Jackson

Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson

Testimony taken before grand jury investigating the Pottawatomie murders
May 1856
A portion of the testimony taken before a Franklin County grand jury, under the direction of Judge Sterling G. Cato, charged with identifying the parties involved in the May 24, 1856 killings on Pottawatomie Creek.. Included are the statements of Harvey Jackson, Amos Hall, I. R. McDaniel, Luther ?, and Isaac Shaw. Hall stated that he had seen "Old Man Brown" [John Brown] in a wagon on May 22, 1856. A one page explanation of the testimony signed by Edward Hoogland is attached.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Free state activities; Hall, Amos; Hoogland, Edward; Jackson, Harvey; McDaniel, I. R.; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Shaw, Isaac

Authors: Hall, Amos ; Jackson, Harvey ; McDaniel, I. R.; Shaw, Isaac

Letter, James Hanway to R. J. Hinton
December 5, 1859
In response to the Redpath/Hinton notice in the Lawrence Republican, Hanway wrote from his home in Shermansville, Franklin County, to share his story about "our friend John Brown," and he hoped their efforts would convey to all Brown's "the character" and "motives" and "place him in his true light before the world." Hanway highlights the attempted "rescue of Lawrence" in May 1856; the subsequent "'Tragedy'" on Pottawatomie Creek, about which Brown personal told Hanaway, "it was a just act, to take the lives of those 5 pro-slave ruffians"; how John Brown was a surveyor who used his profession to gather intellegence among proslavery settlers; the fact, according to Hanway, that the Doyles and others were actively engaged in efforts to run free state settlers out of the area; and specifically denies the story that Frederick Brown was "insane."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Hanway, James; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery settlers; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shermansville, Kansas Territory; Slave power; Surveyors

Authors: Hanway, James

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.