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21 results for Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859:
Photograph, Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Between 1855 and 1860
Clarina Irene Howard Nichols and her husband settled in Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory. She was active in politics and women's rights. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention 1859 where she secured for Kansas women liberal property rights, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her "History of Woman Suffrage".

Keywords: Nichols, Clarina Irene Howard, 1810-1885; Photographs and Illustrations; Women; Women Legal status, laws, etc; Women Suffrage; Womens rights; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Diary, G. W. Paddock
Authors: Paddock, G. W.
Date: April 12, 1857 - July 28, 1860
G. W. Paddock was a minister and free state supporter who came to Kansas Territory in 1857. He describes his daily activities and his religious work, as well as his impressions of the city of Wyandotte while the constitutional convention was meeting there. His entries for this time period indicate he visited the convention, although he does not discuss the substance of the proceedings. The 1857 portion describes some of the free state controversies. He also mentions working with American Indians; however, his descriptions are often stereotypical and uncomplimentary. A number of entries from this diary were selected, but the entire diary is not included.

Keywords: Daily life; Free state supporters; Paddock, G. W.; Religion; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 6, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.

Keywords: Branscomb, Josephine; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Divorce; Doy, John; Fisher, Charley; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Spurs, Battle of the; Winans, A. L.; Wood, John P.; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Dear Sir [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: March 8, 1859
Samuel Pomeroy wrote to Isaac Goodnow from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Pomeroy told Goodnow he was not disposed at the moment to come to Manhattan on account of lawsuits and railroad business, but would come as soon as possible. He looked forward to being present when the cornerstone of the Bluemont College building was placed, and asked Goodnow to list him as a subscriber to Manhattan's new newspaper. Pomeroy also referred to the upcoming election the following June, which would determine the delegates to attend the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, and prayed for a successful outcome.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Border ruffians; Denison, Joseph; Election, Wyandotte Constitution delegates to convention, June 1859; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Skirmishing; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, C. E. Blood to Dear Bro. [Isaac] Goodnow
Authors: Blood, C.E.
Date: June 20, 1859
C. E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow, imparting that the Vivaldi family had arrived in the town via the steamboat Gus Linn, Mr. Vivaldi having brought along his printing press and other equipment. The newspaper was then a "fixed and permanent fact." Blood updated Goodnow on the status of construction at the College and Joseph Denison's new home. He closed by reporting a rumor that there was a Republican majority in the Constitutional Convention at Wyandotte.

Keywords: Blood, C.E.; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Steamboats; Town development; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; de Vivaldi, Charles F.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Leandre Martin]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: July 2, 1859
In his reply to a June 25 letter from Leandre Martin, Osawatomie, Ewing, Jr. agreed there was little doubt that "several hundred illegal & fraudulent votes" for the Democrats impacted Leavenworth's early June election for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention. (Democrats captured all ten spots in the county's delegation.) The problem was establishing proof for individual cases of fraud totaling 450, the Democratic majority in the county.

Keywords: Contested elections; Democratic Party (U.S.); Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, [Marc Parrott] to Dr. Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: c. 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, of Ohio. Marcus inquired about the "mixed politics" he had heard about in Ohio. He also remarked that he anticipated being a candidate for Congress, and expressed his interest in visiting Pike's Peak. Marcus added that he would leave the following morning for Wyandotte in order to attend the Constitutional Convention there, and projected that there would be trouble since the Republicans held a heavy majority.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Free State Party; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


List of Members of the Constitutional Convention Assembled at Wyandotte Kansas, July 5, 1859
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 5, 1859
Document that list members who attended the Constitutional Convention at Wyandotte. The document lists name, county, city, birthplace, age, and vocation.

Keywords: Blanchard, A. J.; Constitutional conventions; Davis County, Kansas Territory; Davis, W. R.; F. A. Hunt & Co.; Funk, J. M.; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Territorial politics; Warren, G. F.; Winchell, J. M.; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Expense Account, Pay Roll of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention
Authors: Unknown
Date: July 5, 1859 - October 3, 1859
This document listed the expenses for the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, including per diem for delegates (individuals listed by name), payments for printing, and some post-convention canvassing costs.

Keywords: Constitutions; Financial statements; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: July 5, 1859
On the first day of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas, with observation on the city and the nature of the convention, which he considered "not a very superior one." Nevertheless, the Republicans had a big majority, and Ingalls was "on some of the most important committees in the convention and shall be obliged to do some hard work."

Keywords: Celebrations; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Correspondence, Champion Vaughan to S.O. Thacher, et al
Authors: Vaughan, Champion
Date: July 7, 1859
Vaughan, editor of the Leavenworth Times, wrote this letter soon after the convention convened to introduce and lend his support to three "Delegates elect from Southern Nebraska to the Kansas Convention." They had convinced Vaughan that efforts toward annexation were not just more Democratic politics.

Keywords: Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Times; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Nebraska Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Thacher, Solon O. (Solon Otis), 1830-1895; Vaughan, Champion; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: July 14, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from the Wyandotte Convention to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. His efforts to ensure that Topeka would be the capital of Kansas Territory had set back his personal political career (territorially and nationally, that is; he had recently been elected mayor of Topeka). Cyrus anxiously awaited the return of Mary and their children, Lillie and newborn Charles.

Keywords: Capitals (cities); Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Travel; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Correspondence, Reinzi to Sir [J. M. Winchell]
Authors: Rienzi
Date: July 22, 1859
In the midst of the convention, a "Rienzi" of Wyandotte wrote to convention president James M. Winchell concerning a potential threat to Winchell's life. The ill-will toward Winchell had been sparked by the convention's "silly and ill advised move . . . To deprive Indians, (who by treaty stipulation have acquired the rights of citizenship) of the right of suffrage with negroes."

Keywords: African Americans; American Indians (see also Native Americans); Constitutions; Native Americans; Suffrage; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Wyandotte Constitution
Authors: Wyandotte Constitutional Convention
Date: July 29, 1859
Official copy of the Wyandotte Constitution that became the Constitution of the State of Kansas on January 29, 1861, upon Kansas' admission to the United States of America.

Keywords: Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Grand Complimentary Ball
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 29, 1859
This ball was being held in honor of the Democratic members of the constitutional convention that was being held in Wyandotte at Overton's Hall. Music was provided by the Wyandott Cotillion Band. Numerous people were listed as managers, floor managers, etc.

Keywords: Balls (parties); Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, Wm Taylor to S. S. Cox
Authors: Taylor, William
Date: July 31, 1859
William Taylor wrote to S. S. Cox regarding his impressions of the Wyandotte Constitution, which had been recently submitted to Congress. He then added details praising the peace and fertility of the land in Kansas Territory. Taylor concluded by supposing "that there will not any disturbance"caused by the border ruffians in the Territory.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Cox, S.S.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Landscape; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Taylor, William; Women Suffrage; Womens rights; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Speech, Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: c. July 1859
This eleven-page document was a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution, which was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention which finished its work at the end of July. Thus, this speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat this latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September 1859. It covered the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat it at the polls and stressed that in light of actions of "a servile judiciary" slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); English Bill; Free state constitutions; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Lecompton Constitution; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Missouri compromise; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Scott, Dred; Slave power; Slavery; Squatter sovereignty; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: August 14, 1859
Back in Sumer on August 14, 1859, Ingalls wrote regarding the convention's recently completed work and the prospects for the Wyandotte Constitution, now "before the people." The Democrats were "taking strong ground against it" because of the state boundaries set by the delegates (excluded "Southern Nebraska & Pike's Peak"), there was to be no exclusion of "free negroes" from Kansas, and of the "apportionment," which gave the Republicans, and thus their proposed constitution, a big advantage. "The democracy are furious about it [the apportionment] of course and some temporizing Republicans are inclined to smooth the matter over by explanations and euphimisms. I adopt a different ground . . . ." Ingalls argued that he "was not aware of any extreme favors or kindnesses extended to the people of Kansas in the last four years by the democratic party which warranted any very delicate considerations form the party in power today."

Keywords: Apportionment; Boundaries; Buchanan administration; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Wyandotte Constitution ratification, October 1859; Exclusion, African Americans; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Land speculation; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Nebraska Territory; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Correspondence, John A. Martin to J. M. Winchell
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: September 7, 1859
In the weeks following the close of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, John A. Martin, the convention's secretary, and James M. Winchell, president of the convention, were occupied with the campaign for its ratification. This letter from Martin, dated Atchison, September 7, 1859, addressed some of the steps that had been and should be taken in the document's behalf during the bitter, partisan campaign leading up to the October 4, 1859, referendum.

Keywords: Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Nebraska Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Photograph, Office of the Union Pacific Railway Co. Eastern Division, Wyandotte, Kansas, 1867
Authors: Gardner, Alexander , 1821-1882; Gardner's Photographic Art Gallery, 511 Seventh Street, Washington.
Date: 1867
A view of the Union Pacific Railway Co. Eastern Division office, Wyandotte, Kansas, 1867. It is part of a series titled Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division. The photograph was taken by Alexander Gardner, Gardner's Photographic Art Gallery, 511 Seventh Street, Washington. This is the building where the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention was supposedly held.

Keywords: Gardner's Photographic Art Gallery; Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Photographs and Illustrations; Railroads; Stereographs; Union Pacific Railway Company Eastern Division; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Photograph, James Hanway
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
James Hanway was active in free state activities. He was a friend of John Brown and served in John Brown, Jr.'s militia company. He was a delegate to the Wyandotte Constitutional convention.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Hanway, James; Photographs and Illustrations; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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