Skip Redundent Navigation
Territorial Kansas Online 1854-1861 Explore Topics Territorial A-Z Map Lesson Plans  

Territorial A-Z

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 0-9


38 results for Washington, D.C.:
Constitution and Bylaws
Authors: Union Emigration Society
Date: May 29, 1854
This document was the Constitution and bylaws of the Union Emigration Society. It included the purpose of the society and information about how to become a member of the organization.

Keywords: Antislavery; Emigrant aid companies; Goodrich, J. Z.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Union Emigration Society; Washington, D.C.


Letter, J. [John] W. Whitfield to My Dear Sir [J. A. Halderman]
Authors: Whitfield, John W. (Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879
Date: February 25, 1855
John W. Whitfield was a proslave man from Tennessee who would subsequently move to Texas to fight for the Confederacy. He was a congressional delegate for Kansas Territory when he wrote this letter to J. A. Halderman from Washington, D.C., regarding pending legislation "regulating town sites." It had been difficult to build a consensus for this law, but Whitfield hoped it would pass the current session.

Keywords: Halderman, John Adams; Speculation; Town sites; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: February 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother Edwin Parrott in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus described his experiences mixing his social engagements with politics, having to navigate through discussions with members of different parties. He mentioned the distrust he had for certain acquaintances that were also active in the government, and seemed frustrated by his only modestly successful attempts to discuss the Kansas question with them.

Keywords: Iverson, Alfred; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Medill, William; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. H. Reeder to Dear Doctor [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 16, 1856
From "Washington City" on February 16, 1856, former K.T. governor Andrew Reeder wrote Charles Robinson regarding his (Reeder's) efforts to influence Kansas policy in the nation's capital. Reeder was working through friends, since he no longer had personal influence with President Pierce, and he was not pleased with the president's February 11 proclamation, which he called "the low contemptible trickstering affair which might expected from Pierce, and is like the Special Message [of January 24] a slander on the Free State Party." Nevertheless, Reeder thought it could have been worse and insisted that Robinson and the other free-state leaders "should not organize the State Govt." Pierce would just use that action to justify aggressive moves to suppress the movement.

Keywords: Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Washington, D.C.


Letter, M. W. Delahay to Genl. C. Robinson, Col. J. H. Lane & Others
Authors: Delahay, Mark W.
Date: February 16, 1856
From Washington, D.C., on February 16, 1856, Mark Delahay, the Free State Party's would be representative to the 34th Congress, wrote to his free state colleagues regarding President Franklin Pierce's directive to Governor Wilson Shannon. The latter was "to arrest and punish all who may take part in the making and putting inforce any law in oposition to the Territorial laws now upon the Statute Book." Delahay warned against "the organization of an independent State Government" and wrote "we are upon the brink of a crisis of serious import." (See D.W. Wilder, Annals of Kansas, 109-110.)

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Free state government; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. H. Reeder to Dear Doctor [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 18, 1856
On February 18, 1856, a concerned former governor, Andrew Reeder, wrote Charles Robinson again from the nation's capital. Reeder advised Robinson of the current situation in Washington, D.C., and urged caution; Reeder believed the Topeka movement/legislature and Robinson must clearly state that they were organizing a "state government" solely for the purpose of being ready to assume authority if/when Congress admitted Kansas to the Union. Reeder believed the "state movement" was on solid constitutional ground if this was its official position in the meantime; they must not usurp the power and authority of the territorial government.

Keywords: Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Washington, D.C.


Letter, N. P. Banks to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Banks, Nathaniel Prentice, 1816-1894
Date: March 19, 1856
U. S. Congressman Nathaniel P. Banks of Massachusetts wrote Robinson from Washington on March 19, 1856, to forward John Fremont's letter (see document, #101103) and to encourage that letter's publication in Kansas Territory. The newly elected speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives believed Fremont was a good friend of Kansas and that he would make a solid, electable candidate for president. Banks also wrote that he was "hopeful the Kansas question will meet its first decision in the House this week." He was confident something positive would be done for the cause. (Perhaps he was speaking of the Howard Committee, which was authorized that very day.)

Keywords: Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894; Congressional Report 200 (see also Howard Committee); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Kansas question; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. House; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Charles Sumner to My Dear _______
Authors: Sumner, Charles , 1811-1874
Date: March 24, 1856
Addressed from the "Senate Chamber," Washington, D.C., this brief note appeared to be a letter of introduction for Mark W. Delahay from Charles Sumner, the famed Republican, abolitionist senator from Massachusetts. Interestingly, since the federal government never recognized the elections held under the Topeka Constitution, the senator introduced "Col. Delahay" as a "member of Congress elect from the state of Kansas."

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Massachusetts; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874; Topeka Constitution; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, W. Y. Roberts [&] S. C. Pomeroy to C. K. Holliday, Esq
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Roberts, William Y.
Date: June 24, 1856
William Y. Roberts and Samuel C. Pomeroy reported their activates from Willard's, a hotel popular with wealthy congressmen in Washington, D. C., to Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory. They described the legislators' and President Franklin Pierce's eagerness to resolve K. T. troubles. While approving the July 4th meeting of the free state legislature, they cautioned Holliday to promote peace.

Keywords: Free state legislature; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Roberts, William Young; Topeka, Kansas Territory; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. H. Reeder to My Dear Sir [Franklin Crane]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: December 23, 1856
This letter by Andrew Reeder, former governor of Kansas Territory, was written from Easton, Pennsylvania, where both Reeder and Crane had lived before coming to Kansas. Reeder enclosed payment for the taxes on his Topeka lots. He also reported that he had been in Washington, D. C. lobbying for the free state cause, informing Crane of various issues being discussed in the capitol.

Keywords: Bogus laws; Congressional delegate; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Easton, Pennsylvania; Lobbying; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. H. Reeder to J. A. Halderman
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: January 14, 1857
In this letter from Washington, D.C., dated January 14, 1857, Reeder wrote at length of a visit with W. H. Russell of Leavenworth (William H. Russell of Russell, Majors & Waddell) who believed the business climate was improving and that Reeder's lots were safe. Russell advised Reeder not to sell anything until value increased and volunteered to help Reeder reclaim the personal papers he lost during the Sack of Lawrence. Reeder thought Russell's help might be useful, since "Russell is so undoubtedly sound on the goose that he can afford to ask for them."

Keywords: Businessmen; Halderman, John Adams; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Russell, William H (of Russell, Majors and Waddell); Sound on the goose; Speculation; Town lots; Washington, D.C.


Letter, J. [John] W. Whitfield to Dear [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Whitfield, John W. (Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879
Date: February 1, 1857
John W. Whitfield, the Kansas Territory's delegate to Congress to March 3, 1857, wrote to Halderman from "Washington City" regarding the "H__l of a fight" they had had "over Lecompte." (Samuel D. Lecompte, chief justice of the KT from December 1854 to March 1859; President Pierce had appointed James O. Harrison to replace Lecompte in December 1856, but Congress refused to confirm him.) Whitfield thought it likely that it would be left to "Old Buck" (President elect James Buchanan) to settle things. He also wrote concerning his own political prospects and what he was accomplishing for Kansas (e.g. railroad legislation).

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Chief justice; Harrison, James O.; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Pacific railroads; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879


Letter, Gaius Jenkins to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Jenkins, Gaius
Date: November 29, 1857
From Washington, D.C., Gaius Jenkins, the man who would be shot and killed by Jim Lane on June 3, 1858, wrote Robinson regarding an business/investment issue (apparently a Wyandotte Float, perhaps involving the Quindaro land investment) of theirs before Congress, but devoted most of his letter to "the Kansas question" and "that bogus [Lecompton] constitution. Former K.T. Governor Robert J. Walker, who Jenkins "called on" in D.C., branded it "the most damnable absurdity and rong [sic] that he had ever known committed in a Republican government. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro Town Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.; Wyandot Float


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dr Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 10, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent dramatic political events. Marcus referred to Democrat Stephen Douglas' "breaking" with President Buchanan. Both men supported popular sovereignty in Kansas, as well as the solidarity of the Union. However, the President, unwilling to override the work of what he considered a legitimate Lecompton Constitutional Convention or to cancel a local election result, asked Congress to approve the Lecompton Constitution, make Kansas momentarily a slave state, and thus enable the people there to make any new constitution they wished. But Douglas, outraged by such a distortion of his vision of popular sovereignty , broke with Buchanan and joined with the Republicans to defeat the admission of Kansas.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio, regarding Congress' apparent lack of efficiency, acting as a "circumlocution office", in which little is accomplished in the way of policy-making towards resolution of the Kansas question. Marcus described his private interview with President Buchanan, who did not seem to impress him, and mentioned that the President's party [Democratic] seemed to be "thinning" in the South.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Davis, Jefferson; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Rush Elmore to James Stallworth
Authors: Elmore, Rush
Date: January 11, 1858
From Lecompton, Rush Elmore, an associate justice of the territorial supreme court, a leading delegate at the Lecompton Constitutional Convention, and a slave holder, wrote this letter of introduction for Halderman to "hand" the Hon. James A. Stallworth, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Elmore's home state of Alabama. Halderman was apparently making a trip to Washington, D.C., and Elmore asked the Congressman to show him every courtesy. Elmore called his "friend" Halderman "a gentleman of some prominence not only in his county but throughout the Territory," and wrote "You will be able to learn many important & interesting facts in relation to the Territory and its Political parties from him."

Keywords: Alabama; Democratic Party (U.S.); Elmore, Rush; Halderman, John Adams; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Stallworth, James A.; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, John [Brown, Jr.] to Dear Father [John Brown]
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: February 13, 1858
From Lindenville, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, John Jr. wrote his father on February 13, 1858, to report that he was ready to travel to Washington, D.C., if Brown wanted him to and to enlist the assistance of Marcus Parrott if needed. (It is unclear what kind of legislative business he intended to pursue there.) John Jr. closes by making what appears to be a veiled reference to the Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania and by relating his plan to move soon to North Elba.

Keywords: Ashtabula County, Ohio; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; North Elba, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Underground railroad; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Brad [A. G. Bradford] to [Governor James H.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: March 18, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James H. Denver, suggested that the effort to admit Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution likely would fail in the U.S. Congress. Bradford also sought Denver's support for his attempt to receive an appointment as Superintendent of Indian Affairs and commented upon Denver's future political opportunities in California.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; Calhoun, John; California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Patronage, political; Washington, D.C.


Account Book, 1858-1872
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: August - September 1858
Robinson's August and September 1858 "Account Book" entries included several for the "Quindaro Company," which was being actively promoted and developed at this time. Specific items included reference to the purchase of "2 yoke cattle" for $150, "expenses of C.R. at Washington," and an itemized list of supplies and services for the infant river town.

Keywords: Account books; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Education; Financial statements; Gray, Alfred; Kansas Land Trust Company; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Schools; Stevens, Robert S.; Town companies; Washington, D.C.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Samuel C. [Smith] to "Dear Doctor" [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 1, 1858
Samuel Smith, Robinson's attorney and associate in matters having to do especially with the Quindaro venture, wrote from Lawrence on December 1, 1858, about certain farm issues--presumably having to do with the governor's home and property in Douglas County--which he was managing during Robinson's absence (Robinson was in Washington, D.C.). Smith also wrote: "We formed another Board of Trade at Quindaro and shall probably have the Chindowan [newspaper] issued in two weeks."

Keywords: Agriculture; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Quindaro Chindowan; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad legislation; Railroad promotion; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Smith, Samuel C.; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Washington, D.C.


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S. [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 15, 1858
In the mostly personal note from Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson briefly mentioned the business ("Lawrence case") he had before "the Land Commission" and then complains about the infrequency of his correspondence from home.

Keywords: Indian lands; Land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus told his brother of his experience in Washington: "awfully dull, nothing like an exciting party or an interesting debate thus far". He discussed to his social life and upcoming trips to Cuba, and also to Boston to meet with the Directors of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Marcus did elaborate on one message that had been clearly communicated to him in the House: that opponents of the "Lecompton party" were not encouraged to unite.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh Boyle; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; United States. Congress. House; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: December 16, 1859
Ewing wrote Republican Congressman John Sherman in Washington, D.C., to implore him not to support the appointment of William Montgomery (D., Pa.) to the Committee on Public Lands. The Pennsylvania congressman was heavily invested in Atchison and could be expected to continue to support an inequitable Public Land bill.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Land acquisition; Land speculation; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, William; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to A. J. Isacks
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: March 22, 1860
Ewing addressed a number of issues in this letter to former territorial Kansas attorney general Andrew J. Isacks (1854-1857), who was in Washington, D.C. presumably lobbying Congress on behalf of Kansas admission, etc., but closed with some interesting comments on Leavenworth's interest in the promotion and development of the Smoky Hill route to the Pikes Peak region. Isacks was one of Ewing's principle partners in the Leavenworth, Pawnee, & Western Railroad venture and was undoubtedly busy lobbying for a railroad land grant from Congress.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Colorado City, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Homestead law; Isacks, Andrew Jackson; Land grants; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Railroad Company; Pikes Peak gold rush; Railroads; Smoky Hill Trail, Kansas Territory; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, M. J. Parrott to S. N. Wood
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: March 28, 1860
From Washington, D.C., the territory's delegate to Congress, Marcus J. Parrott wrote Wood about several issues, including the establishment of mail routes and railroad matters. Regarding the latter, he briefly discusses pending legislation and possible outcomes.

Keywords: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Postal service; Railroad legislation; Railroads; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Gov'r [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to a letter of March 27 from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, Ewing wrote regarding the governor's forthcoming trip to Washington. Ewing mentioned several issues but was mainly concerned about the lobbying effort for the railroad bill and the future state's federal land grant.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Land grants; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Times; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Railroad promotion; Railroads; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Vaughan, John C.; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [A. J. Isacks]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: May 20, 1860
Mention was made in the Ewing letter to Andrew J. Isacks in Washington, D.C., of the development of the Smoky Hill route to the gold fields and railroad legislation. The Atchison & St. Joseph, as well as the "Pacific railroad," was specifically noted.

Keywords: Atchison and St. Joseph Railroad; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Elwood, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Isacks, Andrew Jackson; Pacific railroads; Pikes Peak gold rush; Railroads; Smoky Hill Trail, Kansas Territory; Washington, D.C.


John A. Halderman to Eds. of the Constitution
Authors: Halderman, John Adams
Date: June 6, 1860
While in Washington, D. C., Halderman followed the congressional debate regarding Kansas admission and informed the "Constitution" that Senator [Louis T.] Wigfall, a Texas firebrand, had reportedly "assailed the character of the people of Kansas Territory". Halderman regretted that, since he was not "privileged" to take the floor of either house, he could not officially denounce these "unwarranted accusations" and feared if he and others were silent they might be accepted as truth.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Halderman, John Adams; Texas; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.; Wigfall, Louis T. (Louis Trezevant), 1816-1874


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1860
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the political situation there. Marcus suspected that an organization existed, on the part of Virginia and Maryland, to block the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, and stated that, if the national situation did not better itself, that he had "no doubt that he [Lincoln] will sacrifice his life" improving it. He added that economic conditions were poor, and that many Congressmen were left unpaid.

Keywords: Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Economic conditions; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Secession; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 17, 1861
To his brother Hugh Ewing, who was apparently visiting family in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing wrote concerning his upcoming trip to New York and Washington. His major focus was the prospect of Charles Robinson being appointed Commissioner of Indian affairs in the new administration, and his (Ewing's) likely selection to the U.S. Senate if Robinson captured that position.

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing, Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 20, 1861
As with the January 17 letter to his brother, Ewing, Jr., stressed the significance of Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in this letter to his father in Lancaster, Ohio. Ewing expressed high regard for Robinson's abilities and believed he had wide support, from virtually every "republican of note in Kansas save Jim: Lane."

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Ohio; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Govr [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 24, 1861
This brief letter to Charles Robinson in Lawrence was to inform the "governor" of Ewing's activities on his behalf and to send him a copy of one of the half dozen or so letters Ewing had written in support of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs appointment. Letters reportedly went to Caleb B. Smith; John Sherman; Governors T. Corwin, William Dennison, and Salmon Chase; Joseph J. Coombs; and "Father," Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Coombs, Joseph J.; Corwin, Thomas; Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Ewing, Faith; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; Smith, Caleb B.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1861
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C. to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Ohio. Marcus began his letter berating his brother for his inconsistent correspondence; he himself, though very busy, managed to write Edwin regularly. Marcus also voiced his frustration with Congress, declaring this to be his last week as a Delegate, and predicted that both Republicans' and Democrats' stubbornness would cause the country to permanently divide. Kansas would become a state on January 29, only three days later.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Blair, Frank; Brown, Thomas; Democratic Party (U.S.); National politics; Ohio; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Secession; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 27, 1861
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

Keywords: Chicago, Illinois; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Washington, D.C.; Weather


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 8, 1861
Cyrus K. Holliday, president of the Atchison and Topeka Rail Road Company, visited Washington D. C. in February of 1861 for the purpose of obtaining a land grant from Congress. Cyrus wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, who remained in Topeka, Kansas (Kansas Territory became a state shortly after he left, on January 29) with their two children, Lillie and Charlie. He described the weather and mentioned hearing Maryland congressman Henry Winter Davis speak. He expressed concern about financial difficulties, famine, and harsh weather in Kansas.

Keywords: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Kansas Legislature; Railroad land grants; Topeka, Kansas; Washington, D.C.; Weather


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

The current URL is http://www.territorialkansasonline.org/~imlskto/cgi-bin/index.php?SCREEN=keyword&selected_keyword=Washingto
n,%20D.C.&sort_by=true&submit=Go&allresults=1.
This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.