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42 results for Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869:
Letter, S .F. Burdick to Dear Brother [Oscar E. Learnard]
Authors: Burdick, S.F.
Date: April 12, 1857
S. F. Burdick, in this transcribed version of his letter to Oscar Learnard, wrote from Winooski, Vermont. Burdick communicated his feelings regarding recent political events in Kansas Territory, condemning President Buchanan's replacement of Governor Geary with the "Southern appointment" Robert Walker. He also advised Learnard to either "submit to slavery or fight", and saw no other alternative solution to the problem, though later he cautioned to only fight if first attacked. Burdick added that he wished to come to Kansas Territory, in spite of the troubles, but was held back by his wife's wishes.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Burdick, S.F.; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; National politics; Vermont; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: April 14, 1857
Having finally made and returned from his long-delayed trip to Nebraska City, Kagi wrote his father from Lawrence, where he had gone almost immediately "on business." Although he can't discuss the particulars for fear of "bribed P.M. [post master?] spies," Kagi makes some interesting observations about freestate "prospects" throughout the territory, which "look much more hopeful now than when I left." Kagi mentions some land investment opportunities and the expected arrival of Governor Robert Walker, who would not last long if he tried to enforce the "bogus laws."

Keywords: Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Land speculation; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Postal service; Stringfellow, John H.; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, R. [Rachel] A. Garrison to Dear Cousin [Samuel Adair]
Authors: Garrison, Rachel A.
Date: April 17, 1857
Rachel Garrison, the widow of David, wrote Samuel Adair about the family's land claim in Kansas. She noted that a new pro slavery "skamp" (Walker) had been appointed as territorial governor. She inquired if Mr. Day took 500 rails from her claim and that if he did, he should replace them. In a post script, she asked Adair to subscribe to the Herald of Freedom and have it sent to her.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Garrison, Rachel A.; Herald of Freedom; Land claims; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Battle of; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: May 16, 1857
A. A. Lawrence wrote to Charles Robinson in Kansas Territory from Green Bay, Wisconsin. Lawrence commented on the recently appointed Governor of Kansas Territory, Robert John Walker, and criticized his desire to split the free state party. He referred to disagreements within the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and mentioned that he had resigned his position as Treasurer. Lawrence also discussed the collapse of land speculation all over the West.

Keywords: Kansas Territory. Governor; Land sales; Land speculation; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Inaugural Address of R. J. Walker, Governor of Kansas Territory. Delivered in Lecompton, K. T., May 27, 1857
Authors: Walker, Robert J. (John), 1801-1869
Date: May 27, 1857
In this long and formal printed document directed to the citizens of Kansas, Robert Walker reviewed various issues facing Kansas Territory. He argued that all of the voters of Kansas Territory needed to vote on the Constitution and that he was pledged to seeing that the elections were fair. He explained that this was the procedure that had been set up by Congress. The address also discussed issues related to public lands in Kansas, particularly grants of lands for railroads and schools and to taxation. Walker addressed the issue of slavery in detail and explained that the "law of the thermometer, of latitude or altitude, regulating climate, labor and productions" would determine the extent of the spread of slavery based on profit and loss. Walker explained that this law rendered slavery unprofitable in cooler climates which were "unsuited to the tropical constitution of the negro race." He also argued that it was more important that the people of Kansas determined their government rather than not having one because of the issue of slavery.

Keywords: African Americans; Constitutions; Kansas Territory. Governor; Railroad land grants; Schools; Slavery; Voting; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, B. Darrach to Rev. S. L. Adair
Authors: Darrach, Barstow
Date: June 8, 1857
Darrach, working at the New York Hospital, wrote Adair in great detail about his opinions of Gov. Walker and other political happenings in Kansas.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Darrach, Barstow; Free state cause; Lecompton Constitution; New York; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Sam. F. Tappan to Dear friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: July 6, 1857
In this letter, Samuel Tappan wrote to Thomas W. Higginson to update him on the situation in Kansas. He discussed the "bogus" constitutional convention and Gov. Walker's actions against the free state cause. He mentioned that the proslavery forces "did all they could to have us 'partake' in the bogus election without success." Tappan still had confidence that the forces of "democracy" would triumph. In the postscript, he spoke briefly of a census taken by free state leaders.

Keywords: Census; Election, Lecompton Constitution delgates to convention, June 1857; Elections; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Proclamation, To the people of Lawrence
Authors: Walker, Robert J. (John), 1801-1869
Date: July 15, 1857
This open letter from Gov. Walker concerned the differences between the city charter of Lawrence approved by legislature, and the charter approved by citizens of Lawrence.

Keywords: Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Town development; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Proclamation, No. 2, To my rebellious subjects at Lawrence
Authors: Walkerus, Robertus J.
Date: July 17, 1857
Satirical proclamation against Walker's opposition to the Lawrence city charter.

Keywords: Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


To the people of Lawrence, A Proclamation
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 17, 1857
Quotes from the governor's proclamation against the independent city charter and includes rebuttals to his arguments.

Keywords: Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T. J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: July 18, 1857
Thomas J. Marsh, who arrived in the Kansas Territory on July 11, 1857, made Lawrence his base of operation. He had made the journey as an agent for the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. His objective was to observe and financially support free state efforts to capture the legislature at the polls in early October (this included conducting a census). During his first week in Kansas Territory, Marsh attended the "entirely harmonious" Free State Party convention in Topeka and reported on initial efforts to organize the campaign. He also seemed very concerned about "petty, personal feuds" among the leadership in the territory. Marsh had personally discussed this issue with the men involved and believed the "discordant elements have been harmonized." Upon his return to Lawrence, Marsh found "U. S. Dragoons parading the streets" and Governor Walker threatening to make numerous arrests because of the unauthorized election of city officials the previous Monday.

Keywords: Blood, James; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Dragoons; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Factionalism; Free State Party; Free state support; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Constitution; Travel; United States. Army; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Father [Thomas Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: July 20, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his father, Thomas Parrott. Marcus began by telling him of new land sales near Paola, Kansas Territory, the extreme heat they had been having lately, and news about family friends. He spoke about a recent proclamation given by Governor Walker, who had set up camp near Lawrence, which condemned the municipal government in that city as unauthorized. Marcus added that the Free State Convention in Topeka had delegated him as their representative to Congress; he had accepted, despite worries that his private business would suffer because of the appointment.

Keywords: Free state activities; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Paola, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Parrott, Thomas; Railroads; Territorial politics; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Weather


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: July 20 [1857]
Josiah Miller wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his Father and Mother, recently settled in Illinois. He discussed with them family news, and attached a postscript regarding their land warrants in Kansas Territory. Miller also referred to the free state supporters' rejection of a charter put in place by the "bogus legislature" in Lecompton, and the subsequent meeting of the free state legislature in Topeka. A census had been taken by free state men in the largest pro-slavery localities. According to Miller, this census found that free state men outnumbered proslavery supporters by at least 1 to 7.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Census; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state legislature; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Land claims; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lum, S. Y; Miller, Josiah; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: July 21, 1857
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Marsh wrote his third letter in four days to keep his Massachusetts colleague informed about Gov. Walker's occupation of Lawrence. Marsh, who knew the governor when he was secretary of the treasury under President James K. Polk, had a chance to visit with Walker but found out nothing regarding his current intentions. And the city's residents were "attending to their ordinary affairs as though he were not in their midst"--with some 600 dragoons. Marsh then mentioned, among other things, his visit with G. W. Brown, one of the "hostile chiefs." As with the others, Marsh reportedly emphasized the importance of harmony through the elections and the fact "that their differences was a source of grief to all their friends East, no matter who was right, or who was wrong."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Dragoons; Factionalism; Free State Party; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Railroads; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Travel; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Thos. J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: July 24, 1857
Agent Thomas Marsh, Mass. State Kansas Committee, wrote another of his frequent and detailed letters to George Stearns on July 24, 1857, describing the census and other preparations that were being made for the upcoming election (most importantly, the legislative election in October of that year). Of special interest were the activities of Jim Lane by the Free State Convention to organize militarily for "the protection of the Ballot Boxes."

Keywords: African Americans; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state cause; Free state militia; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Marsh, Thomas J.; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Speculation; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Very Dear Sir, Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: July 24, 1857
Writing from Atchison, Pomeroy reported to Hyatt on matters to do with land investments and/or transactions in Atchison and Quindaro and elsewhere. He also commented on the progress of their railroad project and General Calhoun's interest in the same.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Calhoun, John; Doniphan, Kansas Territory; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroads; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, [Tho. Ewing, Jr.] to Dear Father [Hon. T. Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: August 5, 1857
The first letter in this letter press book mainly concerned with political affairs in the territory was addressed to Ewing, Sr., in Lancaster, Ohio, and dated Leavenworth, Kansas, August 5, 1857. Responding to the father's observations about the situation in Kansas, Ewing, Jr., wrote "I have all along regarded the attempt at an organization of a State Government, while we are a Territory, as the extreme of folly . . ." and some additional observations about the Topeka movement. Ewing "intend[ed] to stand clear of the political arena in Kansas while the leaders of the Democracy are made up of political murderers, and while the free state party is but the football for the Free soilers in the Northern States."

Keywords: Bogus laws; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free Soil Party; Free State Party; Free soil; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lancaster, Ohio; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Thos. J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 5, 1857
Again from Lawrence, Marsh wrote Stearns on August 5 to ask for clarification about an order he had received from Amos Lawrence to pay John Brown $335. Brown was not in Kansas at that time and could "not be of much service if he is away from the Territory."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cheyenne Indians; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; United States. Army; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 11, 1857
On August 11, 1857, Marsh reported from Lawrence that the governor was "still here with his Troops, but nobody pays any regard to him, or them." According to D. W. Wilder, Annals of Kansas, however, all but forty troops left on August 3, the day of the election under the Topeka Constitution, which Marsh also mentioned. His primary concern remained the October election, which many feared would not be fairly conducted despite the governor's promises, and the growing talk of another Free State Party boycott of the polls.

Keywords: Cato, Sterling G.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Election, Topeka Constitution, August 1857; Free State Party; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Constitution; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, A. A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: August 14, 1857
A. A. Lawrence, from Boston, wrote to Charles Robinson, giving his impressions of recent political and business events. Lawrence gave his support for the upcoming Missouri election, which he believed would break up the pro-slavery party. He praised Robinson's handling of Lawrence's trust funds and properties, stating "Old Brown ought to report to you. It is bad policy to have a ranger like him with money and arms at his disposal, and only accountable to people here."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Finance; Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T. [Thomas] J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 20, 1857
In his August 20, 1857, report to Stearns, Marsh again asked for some clarification on a couple payment issues and described his role for the committee (Mass. State Kansas Committee) with regard to Jim Lane's efforts to organize protection for free state voters. For a short while, things looked good for the Free State cause, but Governor Walker's conduct to date had been disruptive and Judge Cato and friends began to issue arrest warrants.

Keywords: Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, A. [Augustus] Wattles to Dear Sir [John Brown?]
Authors: Wattles, Augustus
Date: August 21, 1857
Augustus Wattles wrote to John Brown from Lawrence, August 21, 1857, regarding several matters but focused again on problems within the Free State movement because of a loss of confidence in Charles Robinson's leadership. Robinson had openly criticized G. W. Brown and the Herald of Freedom and the factious party could accomplish little, but Wattles was confident that free staters would vote in and win the October election for territorial legislature.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Herald of Freedom; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence Republican; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Army; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, [Thomas J.] Marsh to Dear Sir [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 29, 1857
From Lawrence, K.T., Thomas J. Marsh wrote to George Stearns on August 29, 1857, to describe the political situation in the territory and the results of the Grasshopper Falls Convention which had taken place three days before. Those favoring participation in the October legislative election carried the day (see Annals of Kansas, 176) and subsequently "a Grand Ratification meeting" endorse the conventions action, including the nomination of Marcus J. Parrott for delegate to Congress.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Hutchinson, George W.; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Music; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Schuyler, Philip Church; Smith, George W.; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: September 7, 1857
Nearly two months into his K.T. assignment and stay in Lawrence, Marsh reported several significant observations about the Free State Party: Governor Walker's apparent commitment to a fair canvas, the rapidly approaching territorial election (October 1857), and the money so far spent and needed for the campaign. He also observed that the Constitutional Convention was opening in Lecompton, and wrote: "If you could see the town, and people of Lecompton, and had the opportunity that I have had to witness their Plantation Manners--I think you would at once be reminded of the Scriptural inquiry, 'Can any good thing, come out of Nazareth?'"

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, A. C. Morton to Hiram Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: September 21, 1857
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, apologizing for his prolonged silence due to a lengthy illness. Morton referred to the upcoming October election, which would select the members of the Territorial Legislature. He also spoke of Governor Walker's attempts to regulate the election process by requiring that all voters be residents of the Territory for at least six months prior to casting a vote. Morton added that Samuel Simpson was in town again, but that nothing had been settled regarding his questionable business practices.

Keywords: Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Hill, Hiram; Illness; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, S. [Samuel] L. Adair to Mr. J. B. [John Brown]
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: October 2, 1857
Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Daily life; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state prospects; Free state support; Health; Land claims; Lecompton Land Office; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Preemption law United States; Proslavery supporters; Sickness (see Illness); Slave power; Tabor, Iowa; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Joseph Pomeroy Root, Wyandotte City, KT to William Hutchinson
Authors: Root, Joseph Pomeroy
Date: November 17, 1857
Root described seeing Governor Robert J. Walker on a steamer as he left Kansas Territory for Washington. He speculated that Walker's administration was in jeopardy. Root made other comments that reflected the negative view of Free State party members towards pro-slavery Democrats in Kansas.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Free State Party; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Gaius Jenkins to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Jenkins, Gaius
Date: November 29, 1857
From Washington, D.C., Gaius Jenkins, the man who would be shot and killed by Jim Lane on June 3, 1858, wrote Robinson regarding an business/investment issue (apparently a Wyandotte Float, perhaps involving the Quindaro land investment) of theirs before Congress, but devoted most of his letter to "the Kansas question" and "that bogus [Lecompton] constitution. Former K.T. Governor Robert J. Walker, who Jenkins "called on" in D.C., branded it "the most damnable absurdity and rong [sic] that he had ever known committed in a Republican government. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro Town Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.; Wyandot Float


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: December 2, 1857
Josiah Miller wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his Father and Mother, in Sparta, Illinois. Miller spoke of political unrest surrounding the existence of both the Lecompton Constitution and the Topeka Constitution. He demanded that judges in the territory have the power to arrest border ruffians, who "were responsible for everything to do with the Lecompton Constitution." Miller also expressed his concern over a letter he had received from a relative, concerning the manner in which he himself was handling the family's financial investments in the Territory.

Keywords: Banks and banking; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Finance; Free State Party; Gold mines and mining; Land claims; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Speech of Senator Douglas, of Illinois, on the President's Message
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: December 9, 1857
Senator Stephen Douglas delivered this speech in the United States Senate, responding to President Buchanan's decision to let Congress determine whether or not to admit Kansas into the Union. Douglas approved of the decision, as he believed it was not an Executive matter. Douglas reiterated the point that the members of the Lecompton Constitutional Convention were appointed to frame a sample government, subject to the approval of the Territory's citizens, not to make a government themselves. Although he disapproved of the means used to submit the Lecompton Constitution to Congress, Douglas judged that the free state government in Topeka was an unlawful legislative body.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election fraud; Free state legislature; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dr Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 10, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent dramatic political events. Marcus referred to Democrat Stephen Douglas' "breaking" with President Buchanan. Both men supported popular sovereignty in Kansas, as well as the solidarity of the Union. However, the President, unwilling to override the work of what he considered a legitimate Lecompton Constitutional Convention or to cancel a local election result, asked Congress to approve the Lecompton Constitution, make Kansas momentarily a slave state, and thus enable the people there to make any new constitution they wished. But Douglas, outraged by such a distortion of his vision of popular sovereignty , broke with Buchanan and joined with the Republicans to defeat the admission of Kansas.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter of Hon. Robert J. Walker, Resigning the Office of Governor of Kansas
Authors: Walker, Robert J. (John), 1801-1869
Date: December 15, 1857
Robert Walker directed his letter of resignation to Lewis Cass, Secreatry of State of the United States. This printed version of the letter was dated December 15, 1857 and was written in Washington, D. C. Walker indicated that he had accepted the appointment as governor on the expressed condition that the constitution (Lecompton) should be submitted to the people of Kansas Territory for a fair vote. He referred to several statements made in his inaugural address and that his resignation was based on the inability to follow through on principles expressed in that document.

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Cass, Lewis, 1782-1866; Kansas Territory. Governor; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T. [Thomas] J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: December 18, 1857
Upon his return to the East (Boston), Marsh wrote to Stearns on December 18, 1857, to provide a relatively brief outline of his experience and accomplishments since leaving for Kansas Territory on committee business the previous June. He said others could be the judge of the success of the "mission," but "a Free State Legislature was secured by the election" and Governor Charles Robinson had been "quite complimentary" of Marsh in a letter to Amos A. Lawrence.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Cato, Sterling G.; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state legislature; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Steamboats; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Territorial politics and government; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Whitman, E. B.


Resolution, Democratic Party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
This resolution seems to be responding to the history of accusations of election fraud on the part of the proslavery voters, claiming that the recent Democratic election loss was due to the "importation of Abolitionists, many of who perjured themselves by falsely swearing that they were legal voters". Also resolved was that Governor Walker's collaboration with the Abolitionists and free soilers be rebuked, and that men from the Southern states have equal property rights with those of the North. The Democrats also documented their support for the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free soil; Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Proslavery support; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Minutes, Democratic Convention
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
These notes regarding the proceedings of a Democratic Convention name newly elected officers of the Kansas branch of the party, and other "preparatory business". In the following days, resolutions against Territorial Governor Walker and Secretary Stanton were drawn, for their "complicity with the enemies of the Democratic Party". F.J. Marshall was nominated as the Democratic candidate for governor, "to bear up the banner of our Party . . .against the Black Republicans".

Keywords: Black Republicans; Democratic Party (U.S.); Hereford, J.T.; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Marshall, F.J.; Martin, Moses; Mathias, William G.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Pamphlet, Address to the American People on the Affairs of Kansas
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
This address recounted the history and purpose of the formation of the Kansas State Government of Topeka, in peaceful opposition to that of the Territory. The free state message accused the systems of the Territorial Government of encouraging influence from abroad in their election process, and indicated that they had nothing inherently against Missouri's citizens as a whole, but implored that they not attempt to violate the rights of Kansas settlers. The address stated that the Territory was "organized for defence" by a pledge from Governor Walker, and appealed that outsiders remain in their homes for the benefit of all.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Big Springs Convention; Border disputes and warfare; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Election fraud; Elliott, Robert G.; Free state activities; Free state legislature; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Josiah; Missourians; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Schuyler, Philip Church; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Broadside, "To the People of Leavenworth County"
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
A printed announcement "To the People of Leavenworth County" nominating delegates to attend, most likely, the Lecompton Constitutional Convention. According to the letter, the candidates named would support that the clause that included the slavery question be put to the people of Kansas Territory for their vote.

Keywords: Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Nominations for office; Popular sovereignty; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Shareholders in the Topeka and St. Joseph Railroad Company
Authors: Topeka and St. Joseph Railroad Company
Date: c. 1858
Prepared by the temporary treasurer (perhaps Franklin Crane), this list showed the names of individuals who pledged capital to the Topeka and St. Joseph Railroad Company, the number of shares they held, and the communities they represented.

Keywords: Burgess, H. B.; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Dickey, Milton C.; Doniphan County, Kansas Territory; Doniphan, Kansas Territory; Elwood, Kansas Territory; Grasshopper Falls, Kansas Territory; Hillyer, George S.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Jefferson County, Kansas Territory; Kansapolis, Kansas Territory; Martin, Samuel E. (Dr.); Palermo, Kansas Territory; Railroad promotion; Railroads; Railroads finance; Russell, Edward; Swendson, Sevest; Thornton, Thomas G.; Topeka and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Willits, Jacob


Minority Report of Senator Douglas of Illinios on the Kansas-Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: February 18, 1858
Senator Stephen Douglas, as a member of the Committee on the Territories, presented this report, which analyzed the Lecompton and Topeka constitutional rivalry, for the consideration of the President. Douglas found that, under the Kansas-Nebraska Act, no government of Kansas, Territorial or otherwise, had the power to draft any constitution without the intital consent of Congress; the territories, though "self-governed" were not sovereign entities, and still were to defer to the direction of the federal government. He argued that even the recognized territorial government had no right to convene a constitutional convention without Congressional approval, and the vote the Lecompton Convention presented to the people offered no opportunity to fully reject the Lecompton Constitution, but only to accept or reject the slavery provision; a person could not vote against making Kansas a slave state unless he was also willing to vote for the Lecompton Constitution. Douglas, however, in his report likened this unauthorized act of Lecompton Constitutional Convention as much "revolution" and "treasonable pertinacity" as those actions of the free state government in Topeka; neither group held legitimate authority to draft or present their constitutions.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state legislature; Illinois; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to Dear Governor [James Denver]
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: October 28, 1858
Hugh S. Walsh, Acting Governor of Kansas Territory, wrote to former Governor James Denver regarding recent political events. The first part relates incidents arising from the mishandling of prisoners by Marshals Robbins and Walker, who had arrested and imprisoned them, leaving them "without a bailiff or any charge whatever." The second part discusses political strategies for appeasing some free state party members in order to win their support. Among those, Walsh proposes that a Kentuckian man become the next governor and that during the Democratic Convention of November 25 they adopt the Cincinnati Platform, which would uphold popular sovereignty in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Cincinnati Platform; Coffey County, Kansas Territory; Davis, Alson C.; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Elmore, Rush; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sykes, T.B.; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Pamphlet, Report of the Committee on Federal Relations Relative to the Admission of Kansas Into the Federal Union
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
This pamphlet includes the Resolutions proposed by the Texas Legislature's "Committee on Federal Relations relative to the Admission of Kansas into the Federal Union", produced in response to the Congressional debate whether or not to adopt Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. This document proposed that Kansas be adopted into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution as it was, supporting slavery or not, and have Kansans amend the document later as necessary. The intention of the Texas Legislature was to remove the Kansas question from the national platform, for they feared that Congressmen from Northern States, acting in their own interests, would never vote to adopt another proslavery territory into statehood.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus told his brother of his experience in Washington: "awfully dull, nothing like an exciting party or an interesting debate thus far". He discussed to his social life and upcoming trips to Cuba, and also to Boston to meet with the Directors of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Marcus did elaborate on one message that had been clearly communicated to him in the House: that opponents of the "Lecompton party" were not encouraged to unite.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh Boyle; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; United States. Congress. House; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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