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17 results for Violent deaths:
John Brown Melodeon
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1846-1857
Abolitionist John Brown gave this melodeon to his daughter, Ruth Brown Thompson, as a wedding present. It was played at John Brown's funeral on Dec. 8, 1859. He originally purchased the melodeon from a musician in New York. Patent dates stamped on the instrument range from 1846 to 1857. It was manufactured by Carhart & Needham Organs and Melodeons of New York.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Carhart & Needham Organs and Melodeons; Entertainment; Funerals; Marriage; Music; New York; Objects; Thompson, Ruth (Brown); Violent deaths


Manuscript Volume, Items of 1856
Authors: Hanway, James
Date: 1856
This little journal/ledger contained a five-page account of the May 24, 1856, killings on Pottawatomie Creek, apparently written by James Hanway shortly after the incident. He mentioned the five victims by name and wrote: "The settlement is plunged into a perfect commotion. A meeting of the settlers was held on the 26th and they mutually agreed to protect each other from foreign or internal foes. All men of real good sense, condemned these midnight assassinations and also the killing of men who are attending to their concerns". This was a somewhat different perspective of the situation than expressed by Hanway in his 1860 letter to James Redpath. Nevertheless, the responsibility for "all such blood tragedies" is with the pro-slave men.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Doyle, James P.; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hanway, James; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery activities; Violence; Violent deaths; Wilkinson, Allen


Letter, S. N. Simpson to Hiram Hill
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: June 17, 1856
Samuel Simpson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill. Simpson reported the recent shooting death of a free state man by a proslavery Tennessee man. Despite this and other eruptions of violence, Simpson declared that " Lawrence as a city is yet in existence and from the character of the people I think we shall long exist" and that "slavery will cut her own life". He displayed little faith that the Territory's present government could produce and uphold a proslavery constitution. Simpson also mentioned Hill's property holdings, all full and paying rent.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Free state support; Hill, Hiram; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Violent deaths; Whitney, Thaddeus L.


Letter draft, unsigned [Hiram Hill] to Charles Wright
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: June 18, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburg, Massachusetts, to Charles Wright in Kansas Territory. Hill expressed disbelief at the reports of violence and destruction that crossed his ears, but accepted them to be true based on his experiences in Missouri the previous winter. To Hill, it appeared that they would have to "take the field to Regain our Liberties that have been struck down". He also referred to actions of the National Republican Convention in Philadelphia (which named John Fremont as their presidential candidate) and dubbed the nomination "their only hope -- short of a Bloody Revolution".

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Brown, Frederick; Dow, Charles W.; Hill, Hiram; Kansas Territory; Law and Order Party; Skirmishing; Violent deaths; Wright, Charles A.


Letter, O.E. Learnard to Dear Father [S. T. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: July 23, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote his father, S.T. Learnard, that he was disappointed in the attitude of people in Vermont and throughout the North who continued to support the Pierce administration. If they did so because they were Democrats, they should learn from Andrew H. Reeder, J. H. Lane, William Y. Roberts, and others who had seen the light. Learnard admitted "a few cases" of free state retaliation "upon their oppressors," and then gave some "facts" about the "Patawotamie" incident, while not mentioning John Brown by name. Learnard believed that the reports about mangled bodies were untrue.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Northern Democrats; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Roberts, William Young; Vermont; Violence; Violent deaths


Buffum Tombstone
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Sept. 17, 1856
Tombstone of David C. Buffum, a free-stater from Massachusetts who was killed by the pro-slavery Kickapoo Rangers on Sept. 17, 1856. Buffum was plowing a field on his farm near Lawrence when the Rangers (including Henry Titus and Sheriff Samuel Jones) stole his horse and shot him. Before he died, Buffum was heard to express the sentiments chiseled on his tombstone: "I am willing to die for the cause of Freedom in Kansas."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Buffum, David C.; Casualties; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Free state perspective; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Kickapoo Rangers (militia); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; Objects; Proslavery activities; Titus, Henry Theodore; Tombstones; Violence; Violent deaths


Narrative, the Murder of Charles Dow, by Isaac Goodnow
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: 1856
This written account reports on the incidents surrounding the murder of Charles Dow, including various skirmishes and military action which followed, leading up to the Wakarusa War. Dow was a free state supporter and was murdered by Franklin Coleman, who, according to Goodnow, had turned proslavery only after coming to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Branson rescue (1855); Branson, Jacob; Coleman, Franklin M.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Dow, Charles W.; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles; Skirmishing; Violence; Violent deaths


Kansas Experience of George Cutter
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: January 1, 1857
This reminiscence is presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, which was compiled by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. George Cutter was with Frederick Brown shortly before the Battle of Osawatomie, and like Brown, he was wounded during an altercation with border ruffians. While he was not directly involved in this battle, this reminiscence is still a rather fascinating account.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Agriculture; Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Cutter, George; Darrach, Barstow; Everett, John R.; Fort Titus, Battle of; Franklin, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Free state perspective; Gillpatrick, Rufus; Horses; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Land claims; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; National Kansas Committee; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Reid, John W.; Sears, W. A.; Shore, Samuel T.; Skirmishing; Topeka, Kansas; Violence; Violent deaths; Weapons (see also Guns); White, Martin; Wounds and injuries


Letter, Ellen Goodnow to My Dear Husband [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Ellen
Date: August 8, 1857
Ellen Goodnow wrote from Shannon, Kansas Territory, to her husband Isaac, who was traveling on the East Coast. In this letter, which is largely personal, Ellen Goodnow describes a frightening conflict between white settlers in the area and members of the Cheyenne Indian tribe. A neighbor had awakened her in the middle of the night to enlist men to fight alongside members of the Delaware Indians, who had also been attacked by the Cheyennes. Isaac's brother, William, had lead her to safety in Mahattan.

Keywords: Cheyenne Indians; Delaware Indians; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, William E.; Native Americans; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Skirmishing; Violence; Violent deaths


Broadside, Cowardly assassination: Lecompton Union Extra!
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
This broadside, a special report of the Weekly Lecompton Union newspaper, recounted the assassination of William T. Sherrard, which had occurred earlier that same day. Sherrard had been appointed Sheriff of Douglas County by the County Board of Commissoners after the resignation of Samuel J. Jones. Sherrard's appointment was not supported by Governor Geary, who allegedly made slanderous remarks on Sherrard's character. The broadside report supposed, since Sherrard was decidely a proslavery man, that free state Legislators, among other freestateman, had plotted against him on behalf of Geary, which lead to Sherrard's death at the hand of J.A.W. Jones.

Keywords: Free state activities; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Jones, J.A.W.; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; McAllister, Richard; Newspapers; Proslavery support; Sherrard, William T.; Violent deaths; Woodson, Daniel


Photograph, Marais des Cygnes Massacre
Authors: Chapin, John R.
Date: 1858
An illustration of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre in Linn County, Kansas Territory, copied from Beyond the Mississippi by Albert. D. Richardson, 1867. In May 1858, Missourians crossed the border and murdered five Free-State men. This massacre was generally viewed as the last major violent occurrence during the territorial period. The site of the massacre is now one of the Kansas State Historical Society's historic properties.

Keywords: Book illustrations; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Firearms; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery activities; Violence; Violent deaths


Letter, P. R. Brooks, Lawrence, K. T. to his father
Authors: Brooks, P. R.
Date: June 6, 1858
This letter described the land claim dispute between James Lane and Gaius Jenkins, which ended with Lane killing Jenkins. Brooks wrote that Jenkins was well respected, mentioned his widow and children and indicated that his funeral was well attended. He also made passing reference to the "Linn county tragedy."

Keywords: Brooks, Paul R.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Jenkins, Gaius; Land claim disputes; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Violence; Violent deaths


Letter, Sene Campbell to [Capt. James] Montgomery
Authors: Campbell, Sene
Date: January 4, 1859
Sene Campbell, writing from Fort Scott, K. T. to Capt. James Montgomery, expressed her anger at Montgomery for his roll in the killing of John Little. Little was killed on December 16, 1858, at Fort Scott by a group of free state supporters led by Montgomery who had entered the town to free Benjamin Rice, a free state advocate being held prisoner. Campbell was Little's fiance.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Campbell, Sene; Casualties; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Jayhawking; Little, J. H.; Little, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violence; Violent deaths; Women


John Brown pike
Authors: Collins and Company
Date: October 18, 1859
Pike used by slaves at the insurrection planned by John Brown at the U.S. arsenal in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, October 18, 1859. Armed with pikes and guns, Brown's army, primarily slaves, took hostages from the community and took over the arsenal. Brown's army was overwhelmed by U.S. troops led by Colonel Robert E. Lee. Brown was tried and hanged for treason on December 2, 1859.

Keywords: Blair, Charles; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Collinsville, Connecticut; Courts; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Objects; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Swords and daggers; United States Government; Violence; Violent deaths; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, John McCannon to [James Montgomery]
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: May 1860
John McCannon, writing from Denver City, K. T., a location that is currently in Colorado, described the killing of a man named Akins. McCannon claimed that Akins was killed by pro-slavery supporters. McCannon also commented favorably upon the Republican Party's nomination of Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate.

Keywords: Akins, (?); Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Casualties; Colorado; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; McCannon, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violent deaths


Pamphlet, James H. Lane vs. Heirs of Gauis Jenkins
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: ca. 1860
This document, prepared by Mssrs. Mitchell and Weer, attorneys for James Lane who represented him in his infamous land ownership conflict with Gauis Jenkins, recounts a detailed chronology surrounding the circumstances of each man's ownership of the float. Lane, who ultimately shot and killed fellow freestateman Jenkins as a result of the dispute, maintained that he was the legitimate owner of the float, despite his extended absences from it. Within the details of the conflict, as described in this pamphlet, are included chronologies of Lane's service as a free state representative in Washington and as a General of the free state militia.

Keywords: Free state activities; Free state government; Jenkins, Gaius; Land claim disputes; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawsuits; United States. General Land Office; Violent deaths; Wyandot Float


Narrative, Account of the Life of Fredrick Brown
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: c. 1857
In this undated document, Samuel Adair related significant events in the life of Frederick Brown, one of John Brown's five sons. Frederick, alongside his father, participated in the Pottawatomie Massacre and other raids against proslavery supporters in Kansas Territory until his roadside murder by Martin White in August of 1856. This document also contains part of a letter to the Rev. S. S. Jocelyn recounting the winter's hardships.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Battles; Black Jack, Battle of; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Daily life; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Free state constitutions; Illness; Jocelyn, S. S.; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Violence; Violent deaths; Weather; White, Martin


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.