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17 results for United States. Congress. Senate:
Senate Miscellaneous Documents, 34th Congress, 1st and 2nd sessions Document No. 32, Three Memorials of the Citizens of . . .Leavenworth County. . .Praying the immediate admission of Kansas Territory into the Union as a State
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 24, 1856
These "memorials" presented by various citizens or Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory, to the United States Congress and referred by them to the Committee on Territories, were written in a petition style, with the names of supporters signed at their conclusion, and requested the immediate admission of Kansas Territory to the Union under the Constitution framed by the Topeka Legislature. Following the three memorials is a copy of the proposed Constitution, as approved by James Lane and Joel Goodin, respectively President and Secretary of the Topeka Constitutional Convention.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Election fraud; Foster, Charles A.; Free state activities; Goodin, Joel Kishler; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; United States. Congress. Senate


Letter, Charles Sumner to My Dear _______
Authors: Sumner, Charles , 1811-1874
Date: March 24, 1856
Addressed from the "Senate Chamber," Washington, D.C., this brief note appeared to be a letter of introduction for Mark W. Delahay from Charles Sumner, the famed Republican, abolitionist senator from Massachusetts. Interestingly, since the federal government never recognized the elections held under the Topeka Constitution, the senator introduced "Col. Delahay" as a "member of Congress elect from the state of Kansas."

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Massachusetts; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874; Topeka Constitution; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, [U. S. Senator] H. Wilson to "Dear [Charles] Robinson"
Authors: Wilson, Henry , 1812-1875
Date: November 26, 1857
U.S. Senator Henry Wilson (1812-1875), a Republican from Massachusetts who was to become vice president of the United States in 1873, wrote Robinson from his home in Natick, Mass., regarding the Lecompton controversy. Robinson apparently had written for "advise" and Wilson simply wrote "you must look well to the position of matters and act as seems to you best." He did not believe it could pass the Congress "but if it is adopted do not fail to elect your state officers under it. Get the power if you can. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. Senate; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Correspondence, John A. Martin to J. M. Winchell
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: September 7, 1859
In the weeks following the close of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, John A. Martin, the convention's secretary, and James M. Winchell, president of the convention, were occupied with the campaign for its ratification. This letter from Martin, dated Atchison, September 7, 1859, addressed some of the steps that had been and should be taken in the document's behalf during the bitter, partisan campaign leading up to the October 4, 1859, referendum.

Keywords: Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Nebraska Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, S. [Salmon] P. Chase to S. N. Wood
Authors: Chase, Salmon Portland
Date: October 18, 1859
From Columbus, Ohio, Governor Salmon P. Chase wrote Wood, a former Ohioan, regarding Kansas politics and his (Chase's) political prospects, speculating about the senatorial contest and the presidential contest of 1860. Chase also was pleased that the Wyandotte Constitution passed by a good margin and believed it would be political "suicide" for the Democratic majority in the Senate to oppose it. "To reject Kansas would be to throw away all." On the back is a "confidential" note from Chase's clerk, M. W. Delahay.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ohio; United States. Congress. Senate; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Gentlemen [J. B. Abbott, et al]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: October 24, 1859
In response to an October 17 letter from "the Seward Club of Lawrence," Ewing said that he was not prepared "to say whether or no" he intended to support James H. Lane for the U.S. Senate. This was a decision best left to the first legislature, which he hoped would contain "our best men," chosen "without regard to their preferences for United States Senators."

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Kansas. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Seward Club; United States. Congress. Senate


Letter, John M. S. Williams to Theo. Hyatt, Esq.
Authors: Williams, John M.S.
Date: November 22, 1859
Williams, an official of the Emigrant Aid Company, wrote to Theodore Hyatt of New York from the offices of Glidden & Williams (California Packet Office), Boston, regarding the payment of "$2500 for some lots . . ." which was to cover a note Williams had accepted from S. C. Pomeroy. But Williams also comments on KT politics: "I have been trying to raise $1000, to help Mr. Pomeroy in the Election (December 6?), his chance for the U S Senate, being very good; but he needs a little pecuniary assistance . . ." Pomeroy's election was critical because "he will have great influence on the course of the future Rail Road in Kansas . . . ."

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Election, State Officials, December 1859; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Railroads; Town lots; United States. Congress. Senate; Williams, John M. S.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [John Hanna]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 26, 1860
In this letter to a friend in Greencastle, Indiana, Ewing made numerous observations about the state of Kansas politics, of which he wrote: "Politics in Kansas you know are a business to those caught in the whirlpool." Ewing thought the state government was "pretty well officered" but was concerned about prospects for the senatorial contest. "Lane is nearly dead with the politicians. . . But he is a power with the people. . . . I look on Lane as a decidedly bad man," even though he recognized Lane's positive "service to the cause before the [Lawrence free-state] Convention in Decr 1857."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Hanna, John; Journalism; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Moore, H. Miles (Henry Miles), b. 1826; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Vaughan, Champion


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: February 2, 1860
In a lengthy letter to his father back in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing, Jr., provided some observations and analysis of the Kansas political scene, especially as it pertained to the forthcoming election of U.S. senators. The counties north of the Kansas River would likely get either Marcus J. Parrott or Samuel C. Pomeroy, and the latter worried Ewing primarily because he was an Atchison promoter.

Keywords: Apprenticeship; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Denman, Hamp B.; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lancaster, Ohio; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Machinists; Moore, Ely; Ohio; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Russell, William H (of Russell, Majors and Waddell); United States. Congress. Senate; United States. General Land Office


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [Hon. John J. Crittenden]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: June 5, 1860
In this letter to Kentucky Senator John J. Crittenden, Ewing urged support for the pending Kansas bill, which would have brought Kansas into the Union under the Wyandotte Constitution, by explaining one potentially controversial provision and assuring the senator that the population of the territory was between 80,000 and 100,000. The constitution provision in question conferred "suffrage on aliens who have declared their intention to become citizens of the United States." Ewing did not argue "the wisdom of this provision" but explained that it was a necessary "inducement to Emigrants" being made by all the western states and territories.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Census; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Immigrants; Kentucky; Suffrage; United States. Congress. Senate; Wyandotte Constitution


John A. Halderman to Eds. of the Constitution
Authors: Halderman, John Adams
Date: June 6, 1860
While in Washington, D. C., Halderman followed the congressional debate regarding Kansas admission and informed the "Constitution" that Senator [Louis T.] Wigfall, a Texas firebrand, had reportedly "assailed the character of the people of Kansas Territory". Halderman regretted that, since he was not "privileged" to take the floor of either house, he could not officially denounce these "unwarranted accusations" and feared if he and others were silent they might be accepted as truth.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Halderman, John Adams; Texas; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.; Wigfall, Louis T. (Louis Trezevant), 1816-1874


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 17, 1861
To his brother Hugh Ewing, who was apparently visiting family in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing wrote concerning his upcoming trip to New York and Washington. His major focus was the prospect of Charles Robinson being appointed Commissioner of Indian affairs in the new administration, and his (Ewing's) likely selection to the U.S. Senate if Robinson captured that position.

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing, Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 20, 1861
As with the January 17 letter to his brother, Ewing, Jr., stressed the significance of Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in this letter to his father in Lancaster, Ohio. Ewing expressed high regard for Robinson's abilities and believed he had wide support, from virtually every "republican of note in Kansas save Jim: Lane."

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Ohio; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Sol Miller to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Miller, Solomon
Date: February 28, 1861
Written less than a month after Kansas became a state, Miller comments on the developing political situation as a carry over from the territorial period, reflecting, for example, on the conflict between the governor and James H. Lane and the selection of U.S. senators for Kansas. Miller had supported Robinson in the past and was now seeking appointment to a particular "Agency," but he refused "sell" his support to anyone for such a position.

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Solomon (Sol); Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Patronage, political; Political corruption; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Senate (see Unites States. Congress. Senate); Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate


Photograph, William H. Seward
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
William H. Seward represented New York in the U. S. Senate during the territorial era. He was a strong anti-slavery advocate and opposed the Kansas Nebraska bill. He visited Kansas Territory in 1860.

Keywords: Antislavery; Cabinet photographs; New York; Photographs and Illustrations; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; United States. Congress. Senate


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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