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21 results for United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs:
Letter, Andrew J. Dorn to Sir [Charles E. Mix]
Authors: Dorn, Andrew J.
Date: January 14, 1858
Andrew J. Dorn, U.S. Neosho Agent, wrote from Kansas Territory to Charles E. Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C. The letter concerned a land purchase agreement he had heard about between an unnamed railroad company and the Osage Indians. Dorn felt that the Indians had been swindled, and he was reporting the incident to the government. He was concerned that this incident might set a precedent for companies buying large plots of Indian land, which would lead to skyrocketing prices and a scarcity of land.

Keywords: Chapman, J.B.; Dorn, Andrew J.; Ham, M.M.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Mix, Charles E.; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Osage Indians; Railroad companies; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, J. Thompson to My Dear [James W.] Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: January 29, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to James W. Denver from the U. S. Department of the Interior regarding the current debate over the Lecompton Constitution. Thompson advised Denver to stand his ground in support of it, regardless of what the President might say; "to turn aside now is downright weakness" and a show of cowardice. Thompson's opinion was that a Territorial decision to abolish slavery would be against the Dred Scott decision, and therefore unconstitutional.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; Dred Scott decision; Elmore, Rush; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Proslavery perspective; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Charles E. Mix to Sir [J. Thompson]
Authors: Mix, Charles E.
Date: January 29, 1858
Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner of U. S. Indian Affairs, wrote to J. Thompson, Secretary of the U. S. Department of the Interior, regarding an incident described to him by Andrew Dorn, Indian Agent in Neosho, Kansas Territory. In this incident, J. B. Thompson, president of an unnamed railroad company bought a tract of land from the Osage Indian tribe without the consent of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Mix asked Secretary Thompson if it would be appropriate to punish Chapman under the Intercourse Act of 1834.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Chapman, J.B.; Dorn, Andrew J.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land sales; Land speculation; Mix, Charles E.; Railroad companies; Schroder, J.T.; Thompson, J.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, J. Thompson to Sir [Charles E. Mix]
Authors: Thompson, J.
Date: February 9, 1858
J. Thompson, Secretary of U.S. Department of the Interior, wrote to Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs, instructing him on how to proceed regarding J. B. Chapman's unlawful purchase of Osage Indian lands for railroad use. He told Mix to inform Agent Andrew Dorn in Neosho, Kansas Territory, where the sale took place, so that he could warn the Osages not to engage in any further sales. Thompson also requested that Mix contact Chapman to inform him that legal proceedings against him would be instituted immediately.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Butler, Pierce M.; Chapman, J.B.; Dorn, Andrew J.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land sales; Land speculation; Mix, Charles E.; Railroad companies; Thompson, J.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Charles E. Mix to Hon J. Thompson
Authors: Mix, Charles E.
Date: April 4, 1858
Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner of U.S. Indian Affairs, wrote to J. Thompson, Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior, regarding communication he had received from A.B. Greenwood, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Mix's inquiry had to do with the land reserve set apart for the New York Indians by a treaty of January 1858 and the growing need for land to distribute to new settlers in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Greenwood, A. B.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Mix, Charles E.; New York Indian Reserve; Settlement; Thompson, J.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, R. S. Stevens to Hon. J. W. Denver
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 14, 1858
Robert S. Stevens wrote from Washington, D.C. to James W. Denver, governor of Kansas, discussing manners of obtaining and using certain Indian lands. Stevens had been in contact with Charles Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, in order to understand the existing agreements between the government and the various tribes. He pressed Governor Denver to make a treaty with the Delaware and Pottawatomie tribes to get control of their lands before the end of the current legislative session, which would allow him to present and get approval for any necessary bills relating to the lands in a shorter amount of time.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Mix, Charles E.; Native Americans; Pottawatomi Indians; Railroad companies; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Nath.. Pope Causin to Hiram Hill
Authors: Causin, Nathanial Pope
Date: May 20, 1858
Nathaniel Pope Causin wrote from Washington to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. Causin had received word from Robert Lawrence and Charles Chadwick of the land claim dispute between Hill and Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. He confirmed that he would represent Hill in his lawsuit to maintain ownership of his claim. Causin awaited Robert Lawrence's arrival in Washington in order to proceed aggressively, but would continue making necessary contacts.

Keywords: Causin, Nathanial Pope; Chadwick, Charles; Hill, Hiram; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Robert J.; Lawyers; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, J. Thompson to His Excellency J. W. Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: June 21, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to his friend, James W. Denver, from the U.S. Department of the Interior regarding Denver's service as governor of Kansas Territory. Thompson briefly discussed possible candidates for appointment to the Kansas Agency, then proceeded to praise Denver at length for his good leadership of Kansas Territory, and he assured him that he had national support for his efforts. Thompson told Denver that the among the States, their party was divided over the Lecompton Constitution, but he hoped that the English Bill would allow that Constitution to be voted on again.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; English Bill; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Mix, Charles E.; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Lucy B. Armstrong to C. E. Mix
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: July 23, 1858
Lucy Armstrong, widow of John M. Armstrong, a Wyandot Nation leader, wrote to Charles E. Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Armstrong wrote that Commissioner Lawrence, in the service of Indian Affairs, had threatened that, because she was such a bother in the matter of obtaining her land entitlement, he would revenge himself to her. She countered to Mix that she had not been a bother, but was upset because the land finally granted her was in three separate pieces, one below the high water mark, and alluded to Mix that she thought Commissioner Lawrence was assigning these poor claims to the Indians in order to leave the better ones for themselves.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Mix, Charles E.; Munsee Indians; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 6, 1859
From Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson wrote his wife back home in Lawrence regarding land and railroad issues that he was working on behalf of in the capital. Robinson briefly addresses issues having to do with Indian land disputes, but focuses even more on the competition for railroads being fought out in Washington between Lawrence, Leavenworth, and Kansas City. ". . . Lawrence must fight its own battles . . . . I hope to be able to make Lawrence a point on both roads before we get through." [For more information on this battle over railroads, see I. E. Quastler, "Charting a Course: Lawrence, Kansas, and Its Railroad Strategy, 1854-1872," Kansas History 18 (Spring 1995): 18-33. For a time, civic and business leaders sought to make Lawrence the regional rail center with an aggressive promotion's plan, but they ultimately, and perhaps inevitably, lost the prize to Kansas City; this piece is largely drawn from the author's 1979 book-length study, The Railroads of Lawrence.]

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian floats; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas City, Missouri; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; School lands; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. General Land Office


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 20, 1859
Mostly personal, this brief letter from Washington to Sara R. in Lawrence announces Charles Robinson's impending departure from the nation's capital city and his intention to provide his wife with adequate domestic service in the future. But Robinson also mentions "our railroad bill" and the long awaited "Indian Commissioners decision probably on the float this week."

Keywords: Domestics; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian floats; Railroad land grants; Railroad legislation; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Stevens, Robert S.; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Cornelius Seth, et al. to Commissioner of Indian Affairs
Authors: Denny, Lewis ; Gray, Michael ; Seth, Cornelius C.
Date: July 26, 1859
Cornelius Seth, Lewis Denny, and Michael Gray, all leaders of Indian groups referred to as "New York Indians", wrote to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The three acted as representatives of their tribes in order to obtain the land entitled to them by the a treaty signed January 1, 1838 at Buffalo Creek, New York. They contended that the longer the delay in granting them their land, the more problems both sides would have. The Indian leaders were especially concerned about tribe mates with homes in other states, who had never intended to settle in Kansas Territory and had sold their entitlements back to the government, to the disadvantage of those Indians who had remained in the Territory.

Keywords: Denny, Lewis; Gray, Alfred; Gray, Michael; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Indian treaties; New York Indian Reserve; New York Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 19, 1860
On December 19, 1860, Charles Robinson again wrote to his wife from Washington, D.C., where he was lobbying members of Congress and other officials on behalf of Kansas and himself. Numerous Kansans, including Robinson, who conducting a vigorous campaign for appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, were seeking positions in the new administration. "Unless men lie beyond all comprehension," wrote Robinson the ultimately unsuccessful office seeker, "I don't see how I can fail of the appointment."

Keywords: Blair, Montgomery; Conway, Martin Franklin; Gray, Alfred; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, K.T., Robinson wrote his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor was not too worried, however, and wrote that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansas Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Senate; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 17, 1861
To his brother Hugh Ewing, who was apparently visiting family in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing wrote concerning his upcoming trip to New York and Washington. His major focus was the prospect of Charles Robinson being appointed Commissioner of Indian affairs in the new administration, and his (Ewing's) likely selection to the U.S. Senate if Robinson captured that position.

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 19, 1861
Charles Robinson wrote his wife Sara again on January 19, 1861, from Lawrence, confident that things still looked good from him in Washington. Robinson mentioned numerous men of political influence who he believed would be supportive and thus insure his appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

Keywords: Eldridge House; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing, Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 20, 1861
As with the January 17 letter to his brother, Ewing, Jr., stressed the significance of Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in this letter to his father in Lancaster, Ohio. Ewing expressed high regard for Robinson's abilities and believed he had wide support, from virtually every "republican of note in Kansas save Jim: Lane."

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Ohio; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Govr [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 24, 1861
This brief letter to Charles Robinson in Lawrence was to inform the "governor" of Ewing's activities on his behalf and to send him a copy of one of the half dozen or so letters Ewing had written in support of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs appointment. Letters reportedly went to Caleb B. Smith; John Sherman; Governors T. Corwin, William Dennison, and Salmon Chase; Joseph J. Coombs; and "Father," Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Coombs, Joseph J.; Corwin, Thomas; Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Ewing, Faith; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; Smith, Caleb B.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Page from Ballou's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: undated
This page from Ballou's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion features a large engraving illustration of Kaw (Kansa) Indians at the office of the Commissioner for Indian Affairs. The caption describes a situation in which various candidates for chieftainship had traveled to Washington, D.C., to obtain the Commissioner's endorsement of one of them over the others. The Indians are identified only as "Great Elk", "Little Dog", "Buffalo", and "Fleet Deer"; the Commissioner is not identified by name, and the page is not dated.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Illustrations; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansa Indians; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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