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72 results for Travel:
Letter, L. E. Carwell for Dr. Webb, Sec. to Dear Sir [James Abbott]
Authors: Carwell, L.E. ; Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: September 22, 1854
L.E. Carwell wrote from Boston on the behalf of Thomas Webb, Secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Society, to James Abbott, regarding travel arrangements for his family. Abbott, along with his wife and children, would depart by train the following Tuesday for Kansas Territory, where they would make their new home.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Emigration and immigration; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Railroads; Travel; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, [James Griffing] to [J. Augusta Goodrich]
Authors: Griffing, James Sayre
Date: October 15, 1854 - October 25, 1854
James Griffing wrote from the bank of the Illinois River in Illinois and Milton, Missouri to his fiancee J. Augusta Goodrich in Owego, New York. Griffing, a Methodist minister, described the daily routine of his overland journey from Indianapolis, Indiana to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Daily life; Emigration and immigration; Food; Griffing, James Sayre; Griffing, Jemima Augusta (Goodrich); Illinois; Missouri; Transportation; Travel; Wagons


Letter, Tovey, R. [Robert] A. to My Dear Wife [Eliza (Matthew) Tovey]
Authors: Tovey, Robert Atkins
Date: c. 1854
Robert Atkins Tovey, Sr., an Englishman traveling to Kansas Territory, wrote to his wife Eliza (Matthew) Tovey, at their home it Albany, New York. Tovey recounted his travel experiences by steamboat and rail. Throughout, he provided detailed scenic descriptions from New York, the Great Lakes, Detroit, Illinois, St. Louis, and the Missouri River. Tovey, coming into contact with slavery on his journey, included brief commentary on the subject.

Keywords: Diseases; Medicine; Missouri River; New York; Railroads; Slavery; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Tovey, Robert Atkins; Transportation; Travel


Letter, Josiah Miller to Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: January 4, 1855
Josiah Miller, having arrived in Kansas Territory in August 1854, wrote to his father and mother in South Carolina about their impending journey to Kansas Territory. He offered them various suggestions on what provisions to bring and what routes to take, as they would be making the trip by wagon and not by railroad and boat. Miller also discussed his parents' options regarding land purchase and rent once they arrive in the new territory.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Land claims; Land speculation; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Railroads; Squatters; Town lots; Travel; Wagon trains


Diary, Franklin L. Crane
Authors: Crane, Franklin L.
Date: February 23, 1855 - September 29, 1856
The entries pertaining to Kansas Territory began on page 18, with Franklin Crane leaving his home in Easton, Pennsylvania with his son, Franklin Jr. He described their journey to Kansas and their initial impressions and travels while in the territory. In June 1855, he returned to Easton to sell his property so he could then return to Kansas. The later entries began in September of 1856 and described tensions in Topeka with efforts to build a fort and rumors of armed Missourians in the area.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Davis County, Kansas Territory; Easton, Pennsylvania; Geary County, Kansas; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pawnee, Kansas Territory; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Topeka Association; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Town shares; Travel; Updegraff, E.; Weather


Letter, Mary [Holliday] to My Dear H [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: February 26, [1855]
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Expecting their first child March 7 or 8, Mary delicately discussed her pregnancy. She assured C. K. Holliday of her willingness to live in rough housing with him. She hesitated to send money for his trip to Meadville, as mail delivery was slow and unreliable, and encouraged him to stay until she was able to travel if best for business and their future good. She also mentioned local mad-dog attacks.

Keywords: Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Marriage; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Money; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to Dear Wife
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 7, 1855
Hiram Hill of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife while traveling up the Missouri River from St. Louis to Kansas City. Hill was a free soil sympathizer evidentially traveling with a company of like-minded settlers, for he wrote that some steamboat passengers viewed the company with "rather suspitious eyes." Hill told his wife not to worry although one family had cholera and, on another boat, fifteen had died the previous week. The letter, written hastily in pencil, is not signed.

Keywords: Diseases; Hill, Hiram; Missouri River; Sickness (see Illness); Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation


Letter, H. Hill to Dear Brother
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: May 13, 1855
After arriving in Kansas City by steamboat, Hiram Hill wrote to his brother. En route, four men had died of cholera while others continued to drink and play cards nearby. Disease fatalities were common, Hill reported. He speculated that the river water, which passengers drank, was contaminated with disease from the rich prairie soil. Hill described life at the Winedot [sic] Indian Reservation (beginning at the bottom of page 2) where he met the "prinsable chiefe" and saw the governor's sister. Hill related news concerning Mr. Putnam, Mr. Tomas, Mr. Gague, Mr. Jay, Mr. Partridge, Mr. Whitman, Mr. Pomeroy, Mr. Fuller and others. He was skeptical that these men would permanently settle in Kansas Territory. Hill also described Kansas City, which he thought would improve under "yankee," rather than "slave holder," management. (Hill's final destination was Lawrence, where he acquired town lots through quit claims not included in this online project.)

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Burial; Diseases; Emigration and immigration; Hill, Hiram; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Weather; Wyandot Indians


Letter, Wm [Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: July 1, 1855
William Goodnow, brother of Isaac Goodnow, wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife Harriet in New England. Goodnow described his current activities, among them serving on the Manhattan city council along with his brother. He related his experience of seeing Governor Reeder pass by on his way to Pawnee, and judged him "fully able. . .to meet any Missouri renegade." Goodnow also anticipated that the free soil members of the Territorial Legislature would resign "not acknowledging this Legislature as a constitutional one."

Keywords: Crops; Diseases; Free Soil Party; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Harriet; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Town development; Travel; Women


Letter, Ellen [Goodnow] to Dear Sister Harriet [Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Ellen
Date: July 21, 1855
Ellen Goodnow, recently arrived at her homestead near Manhattan, Kansas Territory, wrote to her sister-in-law Harriet Goodnow in New England, regarding her trip West and her impressions of Kansas Territory. Ellen described her journey in a detailed but concise manner, and, in her first impressions, likened Kansas to "another garden of Eden. . .too good for bondage, or for the oppressor's rod [references to slavery]." A devout Christian woman, she also expressed her opinion that Satan held influence over the Missourians. Despite this ominous presence, Ellen still tried to convince Harriet to join them in the Territory.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Harriet; Railroads; Settlement; Stagecoaches; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation


Passengers' Contract Ticket
Authors: Phipps, Shaw, and Lowther
Date: August 29, 1855
Robert L. Gilbert, a 21-year-old Englishman, purchased a ticket to travel from London, England, to New York, departing on Sept. 6, 1855. The ticket lists travel requirements such as luggage size, provisions provided, and an appointment time for a medical examination, which was required before departure. Gilbert would eventually dock in New York, renounce his allegiance to England, and travel to Kansas Territory to a farm nine miles north of Lawrence.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; England; Gilbert, Robert L.; Immigrants; Phipps, Shaw & Lowther; Transportation; Travel


Letter, James [Griffing] to My Dear Augusta [J. Augusta Goodrich]
Authors: Griffing, James Sayre
Date: August 29, 1855
James Griffing wrote from the steamboat New Lucy on the Missouri River to his fiancee J. Augusta Goodrich in Owego, New York. Griffing, a Methodist minister, was on his way back to New York to get married. He commented upon the concerns that Ms. Goodrich likely was experiencing as she prepared to leave her New York home to join him in Kansas Territory. Griffing tried to convince his fiancee that they would make a good home for themselves in Kansas. He also expressed the opinion that the "excitement upon the slavery question" in Kansas Territory was exaggerated and that serious violence over the issue was unlikely.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Courtship; Griffing, James Sayre; Griffing, Jemima Augusta (Goodrich); Marriage; Propaganda; Transportation; Travel


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: September 4, 1855
In Scott Co., Iowa ("about 4 miles West of the Mississippi"), on his way to Kansas Territory, John Brown wrote the family to say all was well despite some delays caused by their freight in Chicago and a sick horse. Brown commented mostly on the nature of there journey to date and some miscellaneous business matters.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Oliver; Brown, Watson, 1835-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Iowa; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: September 26, 1855 - September 30, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote twelve pages from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Anxious to have her and their young daughter, Lillie, with him, and unable to come for them himself, Cyrus gave detailed business and travel instructions. He suggested that I. H. Lenhart go to New York to exchange their bonds for gold or bills from the State Bank of Missouri. Mary was to keep the money close and beware of thieves. He also gave instructions concerning route, railroads and steamboats, tickets, baggage, and escorts. Cyrus suggested that Mary travel with F. R. Foster of Spring Corners, Pennsylvania or an agent of an Express Company. Her safety and ease during the nine day journey was his main concern. (Mary and Lillie did not join Cyrus in Topeka until March 1857.)

Keywords: Bonds; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Money; Railroads; Steamboats; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Transportation; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: October 7, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, advised his wife in Meadville, Pennsylvania concerning travel. He restated advice from his much longer letter of September 26th. He wrote of his nomination, yet to be confirmed by vote, as a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention. Holliday decided to decline the editorship of The Kansas Freeman. He expressed sympathy for Lizzie Holliday, his wife's sister, and suggested boarding when Mary Holliday and their daughter Lillie arrived, as he had not yet built a house.

Keywords: Elections; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Kansas Freeman; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Transportation; Travel


Letter, W. E. G. [William Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: November 22, 1855
William Goodnow, recently arrived in Shannon, Kansas Territory, wrote to his wife, Harriet, who had remained in New England. Goodnow related his experiences traveling from Westport, Missouri, where he received quality hospitality from a slaveholder, to Lawrence, and finally to Shannon, where he met his brother, Isaac, and sister-in law. Goodnow also mentioned his recent subscription to the Herald of Freedom newspaper, which would be sent to her; he implored her to save all of them, as he wished them preserved. He added that they expected a rush of emigrants in the following spring.

Keywords: Goodnow, Harriet; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Slaveholders; Travel; Westport, Missouri


Letter, H Hill to [Brother]
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 9, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Weston, Massachusetts to his brother, describing his stagecoach journey from Richmond. Although 47 miles from Lawrence, he had not received a trustworthy update concerning the Wakarusa War. Hill mentioned Thomas W. Barber's murder, numbers of men and weapons involved in the war, and his plans to briefly visit Lawrence. He vowed never to travel to Kansas Territory in winter again. Hill also showed concern for Russell, who tended his cattle in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Free state militia; Hill, Hiram; Proslavery perspective; Stagecoaches; Travel; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Weather


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 12, 1855
Hiram Hill arrived in Lawrence, Kansas Territory shortly after the end of the Wakarusa War. This letter to his wife reviewed the events of the war, made mention of women's assistance, described Hill's journey from Leavenworth with Mr. Conway, and gave an account of Thomas W. Barber's funeral, at which Charles Robinson and James Lane spoke. Barber was killed south of Lawrence on the 6th. Hill had met Mr. Whitney, Judge Johnson, Mr. Haskell, and Mr. Simpson, and planned to visit Charles Robinson. Hill also detailed Governor Shannon's settlement with free state leaders at Lawrence.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Funerals; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Town development; Travel; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Women


Pamphlet, History of Kanzas
Authors: Walker, George
Date: 1855
The full title of George Walker's pamphlet is "History of Kanzas, also, Information Regarding Routes, Laws, etc, etc". Walker, an Agent and Master of Emigration for the New York Kanzas League, included what he saw as "all the information required by an emigrant to Kanzas; so far, at least, as relates to the situation of the Territory". He also included advice when traveling through slave states, suggesting that "the emigrant should avoid all unnecessary allusion to slavery."

Keywords: Economic development; Free state perspective; Kansas Territory; Landscape; Legal documents; Livestock; Natural resources; Roads; Slavery; Squatter sovereignty; Timber; Transportation; Travel; Travel literature; Walker, George


Circular, Informational Letter regarding Emigration to Kansas
Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909
Date: 1855
Edward Hale was the author of this printed letter describing the services provided by the [New England] Emigrant Aid Company and the conditions of settlement in Kansas Territory. Hale included information regarding cost of travel and settlement, conditions of land acquisition, job opportunities, and relations with local Indians. He also addressed the slavery question, and already mentioned occurrences of election fraud on the part of proslavery supporters, but concluded that, in his own opinion "there is no danger whatever for Kanzas".

Keywords: Business enterprises; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Libraries; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Settlement; Slavery; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Travel; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


Narrative," A Twelve Months Practical Life in Kansas Territory, written by an actual settler"
Authors: Tovey, Robert Atkins
Date: ca. 1855
Robert Atkins Tovey wrote these pages so that "those who are going forth with their wives & children, their property, yea their all on earth should have the information covering the country to which they are making a Pilgrimage" from someone who has recently made the same journey. Broken up into chapters by subject, Tovey gave advice about the journey and settlement, provisions, land claims, soil, and weather, in addition to providing commentary about the current political situation and his disgust at the "Mob law" being imposed by the Missourians.

Keywords: African Americans; American Indians (see also Native Americans); Daily life; Election fraud; Free state perspective; Kansas Territory; Landscape; Missourians; Native Americans; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Settlement; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Slavery; Slaves; Tovey, Robert Atkins; Transportation; Travel; Weather


Letter, N. P. Selee to Dear Bro [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Selee, N.P.
Date: January 19, 1856
N. P. Selee, presumably an acquaintance of Isaac Goodnow, and a fellow New Englander, wrote to Goodnow from the East Coast, describing to Goodnow his desire to settle in Kansas. Selee asked Goodnow to respond to what may have been typical emigrant concerns about the trip, which from Selee, included questions about Kansas' future as a free state, the business prospects for raising cattle, and whether or not he ought to "look for a wife" before coming to Kansas, or if he would be likely to find quality companionship in the Territory.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Emigration and immigration; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Selee, N.P.; Travel; Women


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 4, 1856
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from bitterly cold Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Fearing an attack by the Missourians on March 4th, the day the Free State Legislature was to meet in Topeka, he advised Mary to wait before traveling to K. T. with Lillie and Mrs. Nichols. Cyrus also requested northern newspapers.

Keywords: Free state legislature; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Missourians; Newspapers; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Weather


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: March 30, 1856
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote on a stormy day in Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Mary was finally to leave for K. T. on May 1st, provided Cyrus did not come to Meadville before she left. He suggested that she travel with Mr. Randolph, Mr. Thickstun, or Mrs. Nichols. He also requested money drafts drawn from well known banks to ease selling them.

Keywords: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Money; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Weather


Letter, T. [Thomas] C. Wells to Mother [Sarah Elizabeth Clarke Wells]
Authors: Wells, Thomas Clarke
Date: April 3, 1856
After spending part of much of the winter back East, Wells returned to KT in April 1856, beginning this letter home from aboard the steamer "James H. Lucas" and finishing it on April 13 at Juniata, near Fort Riley. He commented on the trip, by rail and boat, and on the fact that there were "Quite a number of people on board from South Carolina and Georgia going to Kansas." But they would not last long, and "The free state people must eventually conquer--the South cannot compete with the North in sending emigrants." Wells' plans upon his return were to sell his Juniata property and take one close to Manhattan, something he describes having done in a subsequent letter.

Keywords: Detroit, Michigan; Free state; Georgia; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Railroads; South Carolina; Southern emigrants; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Travel; Wells, Thomas Clarke


Letter, Mary Holliday to My Dear Husband [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: May 29, [1856]
Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania assured her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory, that although she had read in northern newspapers of the May 21st sack of Lawrence, she was willing to join him. If violence relented, she and Mr. Nichols planned to leave the following week. Previous to writing, Mary sent Cyrus all their money but what she would carry while traveling. Concerning their friends in Pennsylvania, she mentioned a death, an invitation, a sickness, and a success.

Keywords: Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: June 1, 1856
Having long wished to be joined in Topeka, Kansas Territory by his wife, Mary Holliday, and daughter, Lillie, Cyrus K. Holliday instructed them not to leave Meadville, Pennsylvania, until he wrote again. Alarmed by recent killings, arrests, and home evictions of free state men, Cyrus, usually optimistic, foresaw continued unrest. He also mentioned receiving money Mary had sent. In a post script, he emphasized that their journey was necessarily, though undesirably, delayed.

Keywords: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Money; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Violence


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: June 9, 1856
Writing from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday in Meadville, Pennsylvania, Cyrus K. Holliday repeated his previous letter's instructions that neither she nor Mr. Nichols come to Kansas Territory until he wrote again. He mentioned turmoil in district courts and described the positions and numbers of Proslavery forces under General John W. Whitfield and Free-State forces. Colonel Edwin V. Sumner and his federal troops from Fort Leavenworth were attempting to maintain peace.

Keywords: Courts; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879


Letter, Mary Holliday to My Dear Husband [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: June 15, 1856
Mary Holliday wrote, deeply disappointed, from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Mary was prepared to leave when she received his report of continued hostilities and instructions to wait further. Mr. Nichols, Mary's would-be escort, considered leaving shortly despite the political strife in K. T. Mr. Johnson, optimistic about the Free State cause, had told Mary of Colonel Edwin V. Sumner's recent activities there. She mentioned an upcoming Mason's banquet (Cyrus had joined a lodge in Crawford, Pennsylvania on November 4, 1852) and the well-being of their daughter, Lillie.

Keywords: Free state cause; Freemasons; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Proslavery activities; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel


Circular, To the Friends of Free Kansas
Authors: Kansas Central Committee of Iowa
Date: July 4, 1856
This printed circular, written at Iowa City, Iowa, described an alternative migration route to Kansas that traveled through Iowa. This route would allow antislavery emigrants to avoid traveling through Missouri. The circular also appealed to emigrant aid committees in the East to provide funds to send Iowans to Kansas.

Keywords: Circulars; Clark, W. Penn; Downey, H. D.; Emigration and immigration; Hobart, C. W.; Iowa; Iowa City, Iowa; Kansas Central Committee of Iowa; Transportation; Travel


Letter, Isaac T. Goodnow to My Dear Ellen [Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: August 4, 1856
Isaac Goodnow wrote from Rhode Island, as he was traveling on the East Coast, to his wife in Kansas Territory, reporting on his efforts to fundraise for the creation of a college in the Territory. Goodnow thought he should "be able to put the college, through right, by staying East long enough." He made mention of contribution amounts he had garnered already, and was sending the cash home.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Education; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Travel; Universities and colleges


Letter, Martin [Stowell] to My Dear E and others
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: August 15, 1856
This letter was written by Martin Stowell from Lexington, Kansas Territory. He described his journey to Kansas and the movements of his emigrant train, of which he was elected military head. He also spoke of the local vegetation and his belief that he could make a fine home in this country. Stowell also gave his friend advice about the best route into Kansas and recommended that all mail be sent through Nebraska City, NE or Burlington, IA so correspondence would not pass through a slave state. Stowell also asked the recipient of the letter to forward this letter to T. W. Higginson.

Keywords: Brown County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Iowa; Land claims; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Postal service; Stowell, Martin; Travel


Pamphlet, "A Ride Through Kanzas"
Authors: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Date: 1856
These "letters", function as diary entries and were published collectively under the above title, written by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, an ardent Northern abolitionist and agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. Higginson describes his travels through Kansas in the aftermath of the Battle of Hickory Point and includes accounts of the experience of free state prisoners held in Lecompton, as well as those of various citizens of the territory, free state and proslavery alike. He concludes his entries with an assessment of the future in Kanzas, stating that "the more thorough an Abolitionist any man is, the more correct are his prophecies as to American affairs".

Keywords: American Anti-Slavery Society; Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hickory Point, Battle of; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas Territory; Landscape; Law and Order Party; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Prisoners; Travel


Kansas Experiences of A.R. Scolen, William Reap, Ephraim Coy, and Capt. Samuel Anderson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 21, 1856 - December 23, 1856
These testimonies were collected from a number of free state settlers along Pottawatomie Creek, presumably by an associate of the National Kansas Committee. Each account includes personal information about the settler (their origins, family, crops, etc.) and also testimonies of their involvement in the free state militia.

Keywords: Agriculture; Anderson, Samuel; Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, Jr.; Casualties; Cline, Captain; Clothing and dress; Coy, Ephraim; Crops; Food; Free state activities; Free state cause; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Illness; Livestock; Militia; Missourians; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Reap, William; Scolen, A.R.; Shore, Samuel T.; Sickness (see Illness); Skirmishing; Travel; Wounds and injuries


Broadside, Chicago and Burlington Railroad "Iowa and Kanzas Spring Arrangement", 1856
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This 1856 advertisement for the Chicago and Burlington Railroad presented its new seasonal schedule, or "Spring Arrangement", which included maps and information about the company's routes from Chicago to Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri, and connection with stagecoach lines in Kansas.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Illinois; Iowa; Maps; Missouri; Railroad companies; Railroads; Stagecoaches; Transportation; Travel


Boston Kansas Club No. 1
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
Information about a club formed in New England that for a short period of time encouraged emigration to Kansas during the spring of 1857.

Keywords: Boston Kansas Club; Boston, Massachusetts; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Immigration and early settlement; Kansas Frontier; Travel


Letter, C. A. Wright to Mr. H. Hill
Authors: Wright, Charles A.
Date: February 1, 1857
Charles Wright wrote from Bald Mountain, New York, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, describing his travel route from Kansas Territory to the East. Wright reported that Samuel Simpson was still in Quindaro and was doing well, but mentioned that another new town in Wyandotte was being developed; Wright believed that this new one was in a better location. He also discussed buying, selling, and the prices of town lots in Lawrence and West Lawrence, and said that construction had begun on the Free State Hotel. Wright added that a "Miss Hall" in Lawrence had begun writing a history of Kansas.

Keywords: Diseases; Free State Hotel; Hill, Hiram; New York; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town development; Town lots; Travel; Wright, Charles A.


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: March 18, 1857
Hiram Hill, en route to Kansas Territory, wrote from Jefferson City, Missouri, to his brother back east. Hill reported that the journey so far had been pleasant, though they had been delayed by a train wreck and were currently waiting for a boat to take them up the River. He mentioned his experiences with border ruffians, finding that they were "civil" unless they "get too much whiskey down". Hill lamented the resignation of Kansas Territory's Governor Geary, but related that he saw the new marshal, who was on his way to K.T., in St. Louis.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hill, Hiram; Jefferson City, Missouri; Newspapers; Railroads; Transportation; Travel


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: July 17, 1857
In a very brief letter to his "wife & children," John Brown wrote from Iowa, en route to Kansas, that travel was slow because of the freight they were hauling and that little news of interest was coming from Kansas." He closed: "I would give anything to know that I should be permitted to see you all again in this life. But Gods will be done. To his infinite grace I commend you all."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Religion; Transportation; Travel


Letter, T. J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: July 18, 1857
Thomas J. Marsh, who arrived in the Kansas Territory on July 11, 1857, made Lawrence his base of operation. He had made the journey as an agent for the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. His objective was to observe and financially support free state efforts to capture the legislature at the polls in early October (this included conducting a census). During his first week in Kansas Territory, Marsh attended the "entirely harmonious" Free State Party convention in Topeka and reported on initial efforts to organize the campaign. He also seemed very concerned about "petty, personal feuds" among the leadership in the territory. Marsh had personally discussed this issue with the men involved and believed the "discordant elements have been harmonized." Upon his return to Lawrence, Marsh found "U. S. Dragoons parading the streets" and Governor Walker threatening to make numerous arrests because of the unauthorized election of city officials the previous Monday.

Keywords: Blood, James; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Dragoons; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Factionalism; Free State Party; Free state support; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Constitution; Travel; United States. Army; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: July 21, 1857
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Marsh wrote his third letter in four days to keep his Massachusetts colleague informed about Gov. Walker's occupation of Lawrence. Marsh, who knew the governor when he was secretary of the treasury under President James K. Polk, had a chance to visit with Walker but found out nothing regarding his current intentions. And the city's residents were "attending to their ordinary affairs as though he were not in their midst"--with some 600 dragoons. Marsh then mentioned, among other things, his visit with G. W. Brown, one of the "hostile chiefs." As with the others, Marsh reportedly emphasized the importance of harmony through the elections and the fact "that their differences was a source of grief to all their friends East, no matter who was right, or who was wrong."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Dragoons; Factionalism; Free State Party; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Railroads; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Travel; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, I. T. G. [Isaac Goodnow] to My Dear Ellen [Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: August 20, 1857
Isaac Goodnow wrote from his travels in Ohio to his wife, Ellen, in Shannon, Kansas Territory. This letter serves as a good example of the many than Goodnow sent home to his wife during his travels in the States, as he fundraised for the construction of Bluemont College and a non-denominational church in Manhattan. In this instance, Goodnow answers the request of his friend, Joseph Denison, to return to the Territory early, without raising the remaining $500; Goodnow replied that is would "diminish his self respect" to do so, but asked his wife her opinion. He also gave her instructions for maintaining their land and homestead, imploring that she contract out as much work as possible, in order to ease her own duties.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Business enterprises; Churches; Daily life; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Travel; Universities and colleges; Women


Letter, John Brown to Genl. Jas. H. Lane
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: September 30, 1857
At the end of September 1857, Brown wrote to tell Lane that it would "be next to impossible in my poor state of health" to travel to K.T. "on such very short notice. I think, considering all the uncertainties of the case, want of teams, &c, that I should do wrong to set out. I am disappointed in the extreme."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free state cause; Free state militia; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Tabor, Iowa; Transportation; Travel


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: October 16, 1857
Hiram Hill wrote from a steamboat en route to Kansas Territory to his brother. Hill reported no major trouble on the journey until he had reached St. Louis and discovered that there had been a "run on the Missouri Bank" : no Eastern money was available, and businesses were not accepting paper money. Hill seemed to attribute this money shortage to a recent rush of emigration, and thought the situation would improve in the winter, though at the moment in Lawrence and Quindaro things were at a standstill since no one could withdraw money.

Keywords: Banks and banking; Economic conditions; Emigration and immigration; Hill, Hiram; Money; Steamboats; Travel


Letter, I. T. G. [Isaac Goodnow] to My Dear Ellen [Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: October 22, 1857
Isaac Goodnow wrote from New York City to his wife in Shannon, Kansas Territory. This letter is one of many written from Goodnow to Ellen which update her on the status of his travels and fundraising. This particular example includes a mention of Goodnow's desire to solicit the support of Henry Ward Beecher, whose pamphlet "Defence of Kansas" speaks passionately against allowing slavery in the Territory.

Keywords: Beecher, Henry Ward; Business enterprises; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; New York, New York; Travel


Letter, T. [Thomas] J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: December 18, 1857
Upon his return to the East (Boston), Marsh wrote to Stearns on December 18, 1857, to provide a relatively brief outline of his experience and accomplishments since leaving for Kansas Territory on committee business the previous June. He said others could be the judge of the success of the "mission," but "a Free State Legislature was secured by the election" and Governor Charles Robinson had been "quite complimentary" of Marsh in a letter to Amos A. Lawrence.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Cato, Sterling G.; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state legislature; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Steamboats; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Territorial politics and government; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Whitman, E. B.


Written Testimony, Cornelius C. Seth
Authors: Seth, Cornelius C.
Date: January 7, 1858
This testimony of Cornelius Seth, attests to the nature of the Munsee Indians' current status. Seth, Chief of Stockbridges, stated that the Munsee Indians had come from Wisconsin to Kansas Territory in fall of 1839, and verified that they have always maintained a separate organization from all other Indian tribes and do not receive benefits through association with any other Indian nation. He maintained that the Munsees were owed traveling expenses from their 1839 journey from Wisconsin, which was very expensive, and that their numbers were dwindling rapidly "in consequence of want and exposure".

Keywords: Indian lands; Indian treaties; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; Travel; Wisconsin; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: February 11, 1858
Josiah Miller, serving as Probate Judge for Douglas County, wrote to his Father and Mother in Illinois. He offered them more advice as to their financial investments in Kansas and their journey to the Territory. Miller commented that, even though the laws put in place by the bogus legislature had been repealed, it was "hard to tell whose laws are in force." He also voiced his support for a bill which would make accepting a position under the Lecompton Constitution a felony punishable by death.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Finance; Judges; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Miller, Josiah; Travel


Letter, R. G. Elliott to Dear Sister
Authors: Elliott, Robert G.
Date: February 15, 1858
Robert Elliott, former publisher of the Kansas Free State newspaper, wrote to his sister from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, regarding his financial investments. Elliott told her that he was a person who had had both good and bad fortune and, though he was not immediately wealthy and might have to wait to build a house, he had many shares in town properties that should be worth at least $3000-4000.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; Elliott, Robert G.; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Travel


Letter, Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: February 28, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Mound City, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego described his overland travels to an Osage Indian trading post and his encounters with the Osage people. He and his friend, Edwin, traveled through Fort Scott, Bourbon County, on their way back to Sugar Mound; Trego recounted their tour of the town, with large homes, a Plaza at the town's center, and a steam mill much like his own. Trego reported that, if they had stayed longer in Fort Scott, they may not have been allowed out, as free state men were collecting in large numbers to capture proslavery "thieves" and destroy the town in the process.

Keywords: Animals; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Indian lands; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Osage Indians; Real estate investment; Steam power; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trading posts; Travel; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; United States. Army


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [O. E. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: April 3, 1858
S.T. Learnard, a farmer and occasional state legislator from Bakersfield, Vermont, wrote from Granville, Ohio, to his son, Oscar E. Learnard, in Kansas Territory. S.T. Learnard requested that his son meet him upon his arrival in Lawrence. He also referred to the defeat of the Lecompton Constitution in the U. S. House of Representatives, a move which he dubbed "a victory for freedom."

Keywords: Free state perspective; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lecompton Constitution; Travel; United States. Congress. House


Letter, Ms. Maria Felt to Dear Mr. [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Felt, Maria
Date: June 25, 1858
Miss Felt wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, telling of her journey from Clinton, Massachusetts to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Apparently, she was emigrating to Kansas in order to teach school. Miss Felt and her party traveled by train until they reached Alton, Illinois, where they took a steamer along the Mississippi to St. Louis. From there they traveled to Jefferson City and finally reached Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. At that point they traveled to Lawrence by stagecoach and Indian canoe. Once she had arrived in Lawrence, which she found to be a pretty town, she became acquainted with James Redpath, R. J. Hinton, Samuel Tappan, and George Stearns. She also called on Ephraim Nute, but she disliked both him and his wife, writing that they "sat up like two icicles." This letter appears to have been edited at some later date.

Keywords: Felt, Maria; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Railroads; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Schools; St. Louis, Missouri; Stagecoaches; Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation; Weather; Women


Letter, T. M. Eddy to the Officers of _____ R.R.
Authors: Eddy, T.M.
Date: July 2, 1858
This letter written by T. M. Eddy, is an example of many letters of introduction written on the behalf of Isaac Goodnow. Goodnow, recently emigrated to Kansas Territory, was traveling extensively in the East in order to raise money for the construction of a new college in Manhattan. He succeeded in founding Bluemont College, which was a precursor to Kansas State University. Letters like these would have increased Goodnow's credibility when meeting new potential investors.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Business enterprises; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Travel; Universities and colleges


Financial Statements, M. F. Conway to N. E. Emigrant Aid Company
Authors: Conway, Martin Franklin
Date: August 1, 1858 - January 1, 1859
These monthly financial statements, submitted by Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory, detailed company income and expenditures for a six month period between July and December 1858. Conway provided particularly full accounts of his traveling expenses during frequent trips around the territory.

Keywords: Account books; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Finance; Financial statements; Food; Hotels; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Stagecoaches; Transportation; Travel


Diary, Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph
Authors: Randolph, Anna Margaret (Watson)
Date: August 17, 1858 - August 22, 1858
This diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.

Keywords: Cincinnati, Ohio; Diaries; Emigration and immigration; Ohio; Randolph, Anna Margaret (Watson); Transportation; Travel; Water transportation


Letter, J. I. [John Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: September 23, 1858
On the first leg of his move to Sumner, Kansas Territory, John J. Ingalls, a 24-year-old Massachusetts lawyer, wrote this brief letter from Boston, Mass., to his father, Elias T. Ingalls. Here Ingalls wrote regarding the fare and "the best method of getting West."

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; New York; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Transportation; Travel


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: March 15, 1859
Although Ingalls began this relatively brief letter from Sumner with comments on the local election (he won the race for city attorney), he devoted most of it to the Pike's Peak Gold Rush--"the amount and character of the emigration to Pike's Peak is truly astonishing. . . . [T] military roads are already thronged with anxious hundreds, on foot, dragging hand carts, on mules, and with ox teams."

Keywords: Business; Cities and towns; Economic conditions; Elections; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Pettit, John; Pikes Peak gold rush; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Town site speculation; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: July 14, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from the Wyandotte Convention to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. His efforts to ensure that Topeka would be the capital of Kansas Territory had set back his personal political career (territorially and nationally, that is; he had recently been elected mayor of Topeka). Cyrus anxiously awaited the return of Mary and their children, Lillie and newborn Charles.

Keywords: Capitals (cities); Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Travel; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, J. S. G. [James Griffing] to Mr. Editor [William Smyth]
Authors: Griffing, James Sayre
Date: July 27, 1859
James Sayre Griffing wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to William Smyth, editor of the Owego (New York) Times. Griffing described in some detail his family's overland journey to Kansas Territory in a "double waggon." He commented upon the quantity and nature of provisions to take on an overland journey, methods for crossing streams and rivers, and the advantages of a good "fowling piece" for hunting wild game. Griffing also observed that the amount of travel in and through Kansas Territory had increased during 1859, due in part to the Pike's Peak gold rush.

Keywords: Ferries; Griffing, James Sayre; Hunting; Owego, New York; Pikes Peak gold rush; Roads; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smyth, William; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Wagons


Letter, Augusta [J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing] to Dearest James [Griffing]
Authors: Griffing, Jemima August (Goodrich)
Date: August 7, 1859
J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing wrote from Owego, New York to her husband James in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Ms. Griffing was visiting her family in New York for the first time since her arrival in Kansas in 1855. She described visiting friends and extended family in the Owego area, attending church, and purchasing items that she planned to take back to Kansas. She also gave Mr. Griffing instructions on how to make pickles from cucumbers that he harvested from their kitchen garden in Kansas.

Keywords: Agriculture; Daily life; Food; Griffing, James Sayre; Griffing, Jemima Augusta (Goodrich); New York; Owego, New York; Travel; Women


Letter, James R. Mead to My dear Father
Authors: Mead, James R.
Date: August 13, 1859
In this letter, James Mead wrote from Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, to his father about his efforts to secure a claim. He included information about the people of the territory, and the beautiful vegetation and flourishing towns. Mead also spoke of the immense amount of traffic along the Santa Fe Trail, and of the roads to Lecompton and Topeka which he declared were "the best roads I ever saw anywhere." He also described the buildings of Burlingame, Kansas Territory and the make up of the community. At the end of the letter, he mentioned the new constitution, which "is all Free State."

Keywords: Burlingame, Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Land claims; Mead, James R.; Osage County, Kansas Territory; Prices; Roads; Santa Fe road; Transportation; Travel; Wagon trains


Letter, Augusta [J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing] to My Dear Husband [James Griffing]
Authors: Griffing, Jemima August (Goodrich)
Date: September 17, 1859
J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing wrote from Hartford, Connecticut to her husband James in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Mrs. Griffing was visiting family and friends in the East for the first time since her arrival in Kansas in 1855. She reported on her trip from Owego, New York to Hartford and her decision to leave her young son, Johnny, in the care of Mr. Griffing's family in Owego. She described Johnny's behavior in some detail. She informed Mr. Griffing that she planned to start her trip back to Kansas Territory in October 1859.

Keywords: Children; Connecticut; Griffing, James Sayre; Griffing, Jemima Augusta (Goodrich); Hartford, Connecticut; Travel; Women


The New Gold Mines of Western Kansas, Second Edition
Authors: Parsons, William B.
Date: 1859
This booklet contained a description of the gold mines in the Cherry Creek and Pike's Peak regions of Kansas Territory. It included information on routes, campling places, equipment needed, and "everything important for the emingant and miner to know." It had advertisements for businesses in St. Louis, Missouri, and Lawrence, Kansas Territory,

Keywords: Advertisements; Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Cherry Creek, Kansas Territory; Colorado; Gold mines and mining; Pikes Peak gold rush; Travel


Handbook to the Gold Fields of Nebraska and Kansas. Being a Complete Guide to the Gold Regions of the South Platte & Cherry Creek.
Authors: Byers, William N.; Kellom, Jno. H.
Date: 1859
As the title indicated, this booklet was a guide for those want to look for gold in the Cherry Creek area near present Denver, Colorado and in the South Platte area of Nebraska. The author included an account from a miner written in 1858 on the South Platte and provided a detailed listing of the equipment needed and its cost as well as a day by day guide to the route. The booklet contained a great deal of information about and advertisements from Council Bluffs, Iowa, and Omaha City, Nebraska Territory. The author of the handbook felt that the Pike's Peak gold rush was a myth.

Keywords: Advertisements; Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Cherry Creek, Kansas Territory; Colorado; Council Bluffs, Iowa; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Gold mines and mining; Iowa; Nebraska Territory; Omaha City, Nebraska Territory; Pikes Peak gold rush; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 28, 1861
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.

Keywords: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Livestock; Poetry; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel


Letter, John Kimball to Br. [Isaac] Goodnow
Authors: Kimball, John
Date: September 22, 1860
John Kimball wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow, who was traveling away from his home in K.T. Kimball reported on the occupations of a religious camp in the town, within which "the Good Lord is converting sinners." Kimball also discussed the severe drought they were experiencing, and reported great damage to crops in the area. He added news of the Manhattan Express newspaper's expansion to Junction City and an acquaintance's journey to Pikes Peak.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Crops; Droughts; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Kimball, John; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Religious communities; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Travel; de Vivaldi, Charles F.


Hints and Information for the use of Emigrants to Pike's Peak Embracing a Concise and Comprehensive Sketch of the Gold Region, the Best Routes, Points of Outfit, etc.
Authors: Drake, Samuel Adams
Date: 1860
This printed guide to those intending to go the the gold fields near Pike's Peak included a short history of the region since the discovery of the gold and a list of distances from Leavenworth via various locations to Denver City. It contained various tips about how to prepare for the trip. The pamphlet also promoted Leavenworth as "superior to any point on the border" and contained information about the city and the businesses there. For example, the pamphlet listed the number of various kinds of businesses, manufacturers, occupations, and social institutions in Leavenworth. A hand written note on the item indicated the information in the pamphlet was published in the Leavenworth Daily Times on February 14, 1860.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Pikes Peak gold rush; Retail businesses; Town promotion; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 27, 1861
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

Keywords: Chicago, Illinois; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Washington, D.C.; Weather


Recollections of 1854
Authors: Savage, Joseph
Date: June 23, 1870 - September 29, 1870
Originally published as an almost weekly column in the Western Home Journal, Lawrence, Kansas, beginning June 23, 1870, "Recollections of 1854" were written by Joseph Savage. Savage was born in Hartford, Vermont, on July 28, 1823, and came to Kansas Territory with the New England Emigrant Aid Company's second party. The "Recollections" provide a detailed and personal account of Savage's journey from Boston to Kansas Territory, and the first few months of settlement in Lawrence. The original Savage narrative, which appeared in twelve installments (June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, August 4, 11, 18, September 8, 22, 29, 1870), has been faithfully transcribe in its entirety by Shelley Hickman Clark, University of Kansas Law School. The text version provides the content of these newspaper columns but images of the original newspaper columns are not available. See also 'Lawrence in 1854: Recollections of Joseph Savage," Kansas History 27 (Spring-Summer 2004), http://www.kshs.org/publicat/history/2004spring_clark.pdf.

Keywords: Daily life; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Savage, Joseph; Travel


Newspaper clipping, illustration of wagon at campsite on the plains.
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Illustration of wagon and two men camped on the plains. Men are preparing a meal over a fire while their oxen graze.

Keywords: Transportation; Travel; Wagon trains


Narrative, Autobiography of Robert S. Gilbert
Authors: Gilbert, Robert L.
Date: undated
Robert Gilbert, an Englishman who had immigrated to the United States and settled in Douglas County in 1855, recounted some events of his early life. This autobiography includes notes on his birthplace, education, profession, and journey to America, "the land of the free." After arriving in Douglas County, Gilbert would defend Lawrence with other free state men in the Wakarusa War.

Keywords: Daily life; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Education; Emigration and immigration; England; Gilbert, Robert L.; Immigrants; Kansas Territory; New York; Transportation; Travel


Map, Gebiet von Kansas ["Territory of Kansas"]
Authors: Meilen, Geogr.
Date: c. 1860s?
Undated map of eastern Kansas and western Missouri. These regions are home to the many battles and skirmishes between free state and proslavery supporters.

Keywords: Kansas Territory; Maps; Settlement; Town sites; Travel


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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