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11 results for Territorial government:
Kansas Territorial Seal
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 30, 1854
The Kansas territorial seal supposedly was engraved by Robert Lovett of Philadelphia from a design developed by Andrew H. Reeder, the first Territorial Governor of Kansas. Encircling the border of the two-inch brass die is the text, "SEAL OF THE TERRITORY OF KANSAS / ERECTED MAY 30, 1854." The face features a pioneer holding a rifle and hatchet opposite Ceres (the goddess of agriculture) who stands next to a sheaf of grain. At their feet lie a tree and the axe that felled it. Between these two figures is a shield with a plow in the top compartment and a hunter stalking a buffalo below. Above the shield is a banner reading, "POPULI VOCE NATA." This Latin motto has been translated to read "Born by the voice of the people" or "Born of the popular will." The motto speaks directly to the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, creating the territory and establishing popular sovereignty whereby voting residents would decide if Kansas became a slave or free state.

Keywords: Agricultural implements; Agriculture; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas Territory; Objects; Popular sovereignty; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Territorial government


Photograph, First Executive Office, Fort Leavenworth
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1854
A photograph of the building where Governor Reeder established the first Executive office at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, October 4 to November 24, 1854.

Keywords: Capitals (cities); Executive departments - Kansas Territory; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Photographs and Illustrations; Territorial government; United States. Army


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "Dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: January 26, 1857
Written on stationery that included a item from the Kansas Tribune, "Appeal of Kansas to the Voters of the Free States," Kagi wrote his father, who was still in Nebraska, regarding his continuing problems with proslavery officials in Lecompton. Kagi was arrested again (quickly made bail) and nearly killed by a mob while there "to report the proceedings" of the territorial legislature, which opened on January 12. (This was the first legislature to meet in Lecompton.)

Keywords: Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lecompton; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Stringfellow, John H.; Territorial government; Topeka Tribune


Pamphlet, Rules for the Government of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Kansas Territory, Legislature
Date: January 4, 1858
This pamphlet outlines procedures for conducting business in the Territorial Legislature. This document was officially adopted by the Third Session of the Territorial Legislature held at Lecompton, and includes lists and directory information of members and officers in both the House of Representatives and the Council, as well as "Rules and Orders" for both of those groups.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lecompton; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Territorial government


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My dear friend [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: January 16, 1858
E. B. Whitman wrote Sanborn this lengthy letter from Lawrence, describing the political events that had unfolded in the territory since the October 5, 1857, election. Among many other things, he mentioned the split that took the "National democrats" out of the movement over the issue of participation in the state elections under the Lecompton Constitution, January 1857. This "Free State ticket" was, according to Whitman, "a disgrace to the cause," but it attracted a good number of votes and won "a good working majority in both houses and so our people proclaim a victory." Whitman, who had long been a faithful supporter, was seemingly losing confidence in John Brown, as were "the people."

Keywords: Bogus laws; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Calhoun, John; Conway, Martin Franklin; Democratic Party (U.S.); Education; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Elections; Free State Party; Free state legislature; Herald of Freedom; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Congress; United States. Senate; Whitman, E. B.


Speech of Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina on the Admission of Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.

Keywords: Adams, Zu; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Business enterprises; Hammond, James H.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; South Carolina; Southerners; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Territorial government


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Geo. L. Stearns Esq.
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 30, 1858
Whitman's April 30, 1858, letter to Stearns described the harmonious work conducted by the "State Convention" and its nomination of state officers under the Leavenworth Constitution. That movement, he told Stearns, would probably not "amount to much if the Lecompton Constitution is rejected. He also mentioned continued tension in Bourbon County and the route of U.S. troops by "the free State boys" of Fort Scott.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Convention; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Army; Whitman, E. B.


The Issue Fairly Presented: The Senate Bill for the Admission of Kansas as a State
Authors: Democratic National Committee
Date: ca. 1858
This pamplet, voicing the opinions of the Democratic National Committee, charged Black Republicans with inciting violence by their opposition to Kansas' admission to the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. As abolitionists, their "fanatical organization" purposely prolonged the conflict by promoting chaotic Territorial politics via their support of the Topeka movement. The document pointed out the role of emigrant aid societies in settling Kansas, blaming them as a source of conflict since Nebraska had had no aid sociey assistance and was not experiencing violence. Also included in the pamphlet was a summary of a debate in which Michigan's settlement and admission to the Union was compared to the current situation in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Black Republicans; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state government; Michigan; Proslavery perspective; Territorial government; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: January 2, 1859
From Lawrence, K.T., where he went to lobby the territorial legislature on behalf of Sumner's city charter and a "Pikes Peak Express Company," John J. Ingalls wrote to tell his father about the journey that took him through Leavenworth. He made some interesting observations about the condition of the roads and the general discomfort involved in overland travel ("The coaches are constructed with special reference to safety in passing over corduroy roads, through sloughs and ravines, having no regard whatever to the comfort of the passengers."), as well as nice descriptions of both cities, Leavenworth and Lawrence.

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Delaware Indians; Eldridge House; Ferries; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas Legislature; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Pikes Peak gold rush; Roads; Stagecoaches; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Territorial government; Transportation; Wakarusa River


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: January 26, 1859
From Lawrence, January 26, 1859, Ingalls began this letter with a description of the territory's pleasant weather, but focused on the activities of the legislature and the status of slavery in Kansas. He was serving as clerk of the "Senate," while looking after Sumner affairs.

Keywords: African Americans; Boundaries - Kansas Territory; Civil rights; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lawrence; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Territorial government; Weather


Photograph, Andrew H. Reeder
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Portrait of Andrew H. Reeder, first governor of the Kansas Territory. Reeder was commissioned June 29, 1854 and took the oath July 7, 1854. He arrived in Kansas on October 7, 1854 and served to April 17, 1855 and again from June 23 to August 16, 1855.

Keywords: Kansas Territory. Governor; Photographs and Illustrations; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Territorial government


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.