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14 results for Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas):
Pamphlet, Miscellaneous State Legislative Resolutions
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855-1856
Includes Resolutions from various State Legislatures concerning the extension of slavery into Kansas Territory, disturbances in Kansas Territory, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the admission of Kansas into the Union as a state.

Keywords: Iowa; Kansas Nebraska Act; Legal documents; Maine; Massachusetts; National politics; New Hampshire; Ohio; Rhode Island; Slavery; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; Violence


Organization of the Free State Government in Kansas with the Inaugural Speech and Message of Governor Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 4, 1856
This pamphlet provides a vivid description of the scene, players, and proceedings of the initial sessions of the Free State Government convened in Topeka. From Governor Charles Robinson's inaugural speech, the intent of the new Legislature was clear: they convened in order to formulate a State government which would serve their political interests and would reflect the principle of "squatter [popular] sovereignty", since the existing Territorial government was merely provisional and furthermore did not advance their free-state aspirations.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Free state legislature; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Squatter sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Resolutions, State of Maine
Authors: Maine. House of Representatives; Maine. Senate
Date: April 23, 1856
The full title of this document was "State of Maine Resolves relating to the extension of slavery, the territory of Kansas, and secret political associations." The state legislature of Maine issued this statement listing their five resolutions about the state of affairs in Kansas Territory. The state legislature was against the expansion of slavery and they wanted the fate of Kansas Territory to be decided by the people living in the territory, without outside interference from hostile political organizations. The document was signed by Josiah S. Little of Maine's House of Representatives, Lot. M. Morrill of the Senate, and Samuel Wells of the Secretary's Office. Caleb Ayer certified that this copy of the original document was fully accurate.

Keywords: Antislavery; Antislavery perspective; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas question; Maine; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas)


Letter, A. Pierse to Dear Sir [Eli Thayer]
Authors: Pierse, A.
Date: March 31, 1857
A. Pierse wrote from Washington, D.C. to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pierse was born in North Carolina and lived most of his life in the South but had been living in Minnesota Territory for the past seven years. He told Thayer that he planned to move to Kansas in the spring of 1857. Pierse offered Thayer his opinion on what free state supporters should do in Kansas Territory. He informed Thayer that, although he had "Southern opinions on the subject of slavery" and believed the federal government had no right to prohibit slavery in the territories, he was "without prejudice for or against either side" in the debate over slavery in Kansas Territory. Pierse suggested that the best course for free staters to take would be to accept the Dred Scott decision, actively participate in the political process in Kansas Territory, and work for the admission of Kansas as a state with or without slavery. Once Kansas was admitted, he contended, free state supporters would be on firmer legal ground to advocate for the prohibition of slavery, since it was generally accepted that "the people have the power to prohibit slavery in their state." He concluded by stating that once Kansas was a state, free staters could make the case that property would be worth 3 or 4 times more if slavery was prohibited in the state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Dred Scott decision; Free state prospects; Pierse, A.; Proslavery perspective; Slavery; Southern emigrants; Southerners; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Concurrent Resolutions, New York State Senate, Relative to a Constitution for Kansas
Authors: New York State Senate
Date: January 6, 1858
This resolution proposed to support the creation, by peaceful and just electoral means, of a state constitution in the Kansas Territory. The resolution also suggested that if a constitution could be approved by the voters of the Kansas Territory, that the U. S. Congress accept the territory as a state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Constitutions; Elections; National politics; New York; New York State Senate; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Violence


Letter, T. J. Robinson to Governor [James W. Denver]
Authors: Robinson, Thomas J.
Date: March 3, 1858
Thomas J. Robinson, writing from Washington D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, speculated that Kansas would be admitted as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Robinson suggested that Denver's future political prospects would improve from such an occurrence.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Herndon, Lou; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Thomas J.; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Town promotion


Letter, Jo. P. Vaughn to Genl. [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Vaughn, John P.
Date: March 4, 1858
John P. Vaughn, writing from Sacramento, California to Governor James W. Denver, about his efforts to get the California legislature to support Kansas' admission as a state under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Vaughn, John P.


Letter, Brad. [A. J. Bradford] to [Governor James W.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: April 1, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported upon the U.S. House of Representative's passage of the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, which proposed to resubmit the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Bradford predicted, however, that a House-Senate conference committee would endorse the Senate's version of the Lecompton Constitution bill, which proposed the admission of Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Bradford added that he believed both houses of Congress would agree to admit Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; California; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Pamphlet, Report of the Committee on Federal Relations Relative to the Admission of Kansas Into the Federal Union
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
This pamphlet includes the Resolutions proposed by the Texas Legislature's "Committee on Federal Relations relative to the Admission of Kansas into the Federal Union", produced in response to the Congressional debate whether or not to adopt Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. This document proposed that Kansas be adopted into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution as it was, supporting slavery or not, and have Kansans amend the document later as necessary. The intention of the Texas Legislature was to remove the Kansas question from the national platform, for they feared that Congressmen from Northern States, acting in their own interests, would never vote to adopt another proslavery territory into statehood.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, E. C. Andreas to Friend [William] Goodnow
Authors: Andreas, E.C.
Date: January 25, 1859
E. C. Andreas wrote from New England to his friend William Goodnow in Kansas Territory. Andreas reacted to news he had heard regarding "commotion" in the Territory caused by "modern Democrats" and border ruffians, calling them "far worse than fever & ague." He communicated the opinion that there was little hope for Kansas to be admitted to the Union under the current Congress and Administration. Andreas also mentioned Goodnow's management of his land titles.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Buchanan administration; Crops; Democratic Party (U.S.); Goodnow, William E.; National politics; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas)


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 20, 1860
Charles Robinson wrote several letters to his wife in Lawrence as he traveled East in January 1860. From the Astor House, New York, on January 20, he wrote that Congress was not yet in session and that everyone expected the Democrats to oppose Kansas admission. It was possible that Robinson could "be sent for as a witness in Harpers Ferry affair" (Congressional investigation/hearings).

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; New York; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Letter, John James Ingalls to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: April 3, 1860
Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

Keywords: Agriculture; Business; Colorado gold fields; Crops; Economic conditions; Economic development; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Land speculation; Pikes Peak gold rush; Speculation; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Telegraph


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, [Mary Holliday] to Dear H [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: February 2, 1861
Mary Holliday wrote from Topeka to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, in Washington, D. C. She described farm and financial difficulties, especially her frustration with John, an incompetent hired hand. She also considered releasing her "girl" to save money and taking in Sister Tite as an unpaid but potentially helpful guest. Mary requested instructions concerning lumber, asked for seeds and carpets, and mentioned local happenings. She hoped that the statehood of Kansas would encourage Cyrus to return quickly. The letter has no signature.

Keywords: Economic conditions; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Household activities; Livestock; Servants; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Topeka, Kansas; Weather


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.