Skip Redundent Navigation
Territorial Kansas Online 1854-1861 Explore Topics Territorial A-Z Map Lesson Plans  

Territorial A-Z

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 0-9


15 results for Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894:
An Act to incorporate the City of Topeka
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: February 14, 1857 & April 22, 1857
This act, handwritten by Cyrus K. Holliday, was passed by the territorial legislature at Lecompton on February 14th, 1857. Its three sections established the city limits of Topeka, designated a board of trustees, and secured the city's rights. Fred P. Stanton, Secretary of the Territory of Kansas, certified this copy of the act.

Keywords: Cleveland, L. G.; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Dickey, Milton C.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Legal documents; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Thornton, Thomas G.; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Walkley, I.


Letter, James H. Holmes to My dear friend [John] Brown
Authors: Holmes, James H.
Date: April 30, 1857
From Lawrence, on April 30, 1857, Holmes wrote to urge Brown to contact him directly regarding the ominous state of affairs in the territory at that time. Acting governor Frederick Stanton had announced that the "Bogus" laws would be enforced and "The people shout--Never!" Stanton promised "war to the knife and the knife to the hilt."

Keywords: Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Emporia, Kansas Territory; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Holmes, James H.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Taxation; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My dear [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: May 18, 1857
In his May 18 report to Franklin Sanborn, agent Whitman of Lawrence again cast shame on Massachusetts for its failure to provided needed financial support for the cause in Kansas but focused on his efforts to provide aid for "the school project." Whitman claimed credit for establishing both an elementary school and a high school, the latter of which "is fast becoming a Model," and he hoped his financing would not disappear. He also comments on the political situation, especially the fact that Charles Robinson had "to a large extent" lost the "confidence" of the people.

Keywords: Chicago, Illinois; Education; Free state support; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; National Kansas Committee; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, T. [Thomas] J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 20, 1857
In his August 20, 1857, report to Stearns, Marsh again asked for some clarification on a couple payment issues and described his role for the committee (Mass. State Kansas Committee) with regard to Jim Lane's efforts to organize protection for free state voters. For a short while, things looked good for the Free State cause, but Governor Walker's conduct to date had been disruptive and Judge Cato and friends began to issue arrest warrants.

Keywords: Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: December 2, 1857
Josiah Miller wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his Father and Mother, in Sparta, Illinois. Miller spoke of political unrest surrounding the existence of both the Lecompton Constitution and the Topeka Constitution. He demanded that judges in the territory have the power to arrest border ruffians, who "were responsible for everything to do with the Lecompton Constitution." Miller also expressed his concern over a letter he had received from a relative, concerning the manner in which he himself was handling the family's financial investments in the Territory.

Keywords: Banks and banking; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Finance; Free State Party; Gold mines and mining; Land claims; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Your affectionate Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: December 21, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego, in addition to elaborating on hunting and mill work, described at length the skirmishing between local free state and proslavery men, which had been continuous throughout the summer and fall. He reported the manner in which Missourians had seized and occupied lands in the absence of their owners, who were free state men. "Bogus courts" had brought the free state men who defended their lands to court, which resulted in so many fees owed that the men had to sell their land to pay them; the new owners were usually Missourians. Trego accused proslavery supporters of fabricating stories about destruction caused by warring Abolitionists in order to draw the support of the U.S. troops. Controversy over the Lecompton Constitution flourished in free state circles; the Free State Legislature in Topeka had repealed the "bogus laws" of the Territorial Legislature and appointed James Lane the head of a free state militia.

Keywords: Bogus laws; Bogus legislature; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Business enterprises; Free state legislature; Free state militia; Hunting; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Military; Mills and mill-work; Missourians; Proslavery supporters; Sharps rifles; Skirmishing; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Letter, Chas. Robinson (on behalf of the citizens of Lawrence) to Hon. F. P. Stanton
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: 1857
This letter by Charles Robinson, free state leader and future Governor of the state of Kansas, appears here in published form. Robinson wrote to F. P. Stanton, the acting governor of Kansas Territory, expressing his opinion that the people of the Territory were not getting their fair say in electing officers or administrating territorial laws. He referred to the upcoming Lecompton Constitutional Convention, which would take place in September 1857, and outlined some procedural guidelines by which the Convention should be run if the free state men were to participate.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894


Minutes, Democratic Convention
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
These notes regarding the proceedings of a Democratic Convention name newly elected officers of the Kansas branch of the party, and other "preparatory business". In the following days, resolutions against Territorial Governor Walker and Secretary Stanton were drawn, for their "complicity with the enemies of the Democratic Party". F.J. Marshall was nominated as the Democratic candidate for governor, "to bear up the banner of our Party . . .against the Black Republicans".

Keywords: Black Republicans; Democratic Party (U.S.); Hereford, J.T.; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Marshall, F.J.; Martin, Moses; Mathias, William G.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Samuel C. [Smith] to "Dear Dr." [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 7, 1858
In this letter, also from Lawrence, Smith went into some detail about developments with respect to the Delaware lands, apparently connected to a railroad promotion scheme. The Indians "know that [Robert S.] Stevens is connected with the R. R. enterprise and this action of his . . . Has excited their mistrust and caused obstacles to rise in the way of such a treaty as you [Robinson] desire."

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Delaware Indians; English Bill; Indian treaties; Miller, Josiah; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Railroad promotion; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [John Hanna]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 26, 1860
In this letter to a friend in Greencastle, Indiana, Ewing made numerous observations about the state of Kansas politics, of which he wrote: "Politics in Kansas you know are a business to those caught in the whirlpool." Ewing thought the state government was "pretty well officered" but was concerned about prospects for the senatorial contest. "Lane is nearly dead with the politicians. . . But he is a power with the people. . . . I look on Lane as a decidedly bad man," even though he recognized Lane's positive "service to the cause before the [Lawrence free-state] Convention in Decr 1857."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Hanna, John; Journalism; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Moore, H. Miles (Henry Miles), b. 1826; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Vaughan, Champion


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, K.T., Robinson wrote his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor was not too worried, however, and wrote that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansas Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Senate; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing, Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 20, 1861
As with the January 17 letter to his brother, Ewing, Jr., stressed the significance of Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in this letter to his father in Lancaster, Ohio. Ewing expressed high regard for Robinson's abilities and believed he had wide support, from virtually every "republican of note in Kansas save Jim: Lane."

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Ohio; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Sol Miller to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Miller, Solomon
Date: February 28, 1861
Written less than a month after Kansas became a state, Miller comments on the developing political situation as a carry over from the territorial period, reflecting, for example, on the conflict between the governor and James H. Lane and the selection of U.S. senators for Kansas. Miller had supported Robinson in the past and was now seeking appointment to a particular "Agency," but he refused "sell" his support to anyone for such a position.

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Solomon (Sol); Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Patronage, political; Political corruption; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Senate (see Unites States. Congress. Senate); Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

The current URL is http://www.territorialkansasonline.org/~imlskto/cgi-bin/index.php?SCREEN=keyword&selected_keyword=Stanton,%
20Frederick%20Perry,%201814-1894&sort_by=true&submit=Go&allresults=1.
This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.