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12 results for Speeches, addresses, etc.:
Invitation, presentation by James Abbott
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: September 5, 1855
This printed invitation announced the New York visit of Kansas Territory's James Abbott and his appointment to speak about "the Triumph of Freedom over Slavery in that vicinity" to interested citizens of New York.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Balrock, Paul; Conkling, F.A.; Free state cause; Greeley, Horace, 1811-1872; King, Charles; Nash, Alanson; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Williams, John E.


Organization of the Free State Government in Kansas with the Inaugural Speech and Message of Governor Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 4, 1856
This pamphlet provides a vivid description of the scene, players, and proceedings of the initial sessions of the Free State Government convened in Topeka. From Governor Charles Robinson's inaugural speech, the intent of the new Legislature was clear: they convened in order to formulate a State government which would serve their political interests and would reflect the principle of "squatter [popular] sovereignty", since the existing Territorial government was merely provisional and furthermore did not advance their free-state aspirations.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Free state legislature; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Squatter sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Letter, Jonathan Watson[,] J. H. Baker[,] Thos. S. Chase [&] E. H. Chase to Col. C. K. Holliday
Authors: Baker, J. H.; Chase, E. H.; Chase, Thos. S.; Watson, Jonathan
Date: July 29, 1856
This letter, sent by a Republican Party caucus committee in Titusville, Pennsylvania, requested that Cyrus K. Holliday speak at a convention in August. They described a local political shift, as Democrats agreed to support the Republican presidential nominee. Cyrus already had left Topeka on July 7th, intending to bring his wife, Mary, and daughter, Lillie, to Kansas Territory. Responding to invitations such as this, Cyrus spoke about 130 times on behalf of the Republican presidential candidate, John Charles Fremont, who supported admittance of Kansas as a free state. Though speaking mostly in Pennsylvania, Cyrus saw little of his family until after the November election, which Fremont lost.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Pennsylvania; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Speeches, addresses, etc.


Letter, Henry Woods to Col [Cyrus K.] Holliday
Authors: Woods, Henry
Date: October 2, 1856
Henry Woods, member of the Township Meetings and Speakers committee of the Fremont Club, asked Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, give an address that evening in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Holliday had returned to his home state to speak on behalf of Republican presidential nominee John Charles Fremont, who supported the free state cause. Woods' brief letter was written on the back of a printed list of subcommittees of the Fremont County Executive Committee. Evidentially, Woods had enclosed with the letter a note from G. E. Appleton of Birmingham, which requested that Holliday speak there the following day.

Keywords: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Speeches, addresses, etc.; Woods, Henry


Invitation, Address by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Authors: Channing, William F.
Date: November 8, 1856
A printed invitation issued by William F. Channing to an address by Ralph Waldo Emerson "in aid of ther sufferers in Kansas." The address was given at the Tremont Temple in Boston Massachusetts and was sponsored by the Young Men's Kansas Relief Society.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Channing, William F.; Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882; Invitation; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Young Men's Kansas Relief Society


Letter, S. G. Hubbard to Capt. John Brown
Authors: Hubbard, S. G.
Date: March 2, 1857
From New Haven, Connecticut, S. G. Hubbard, "Yours for Free Kansas," wrote John Brown about a date for his forthcoming meeting in that city.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state support; Hubbard, S. G.; New Haven, Connecticut; Speeches, addresses, etc.


Letter, S. G. Hubbard to Capt. John Brown
Authors: Hubbard, S. G.
Date: March 9, 1857
According to S. G. Hubbard who wrote Brown on March 9, 1857, "arrangements for the Hall have fallen through" in his city of New Haven, and Brown might have to settle for "a private conference," if he was interested in this alternative.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Hubbard, S. G.; New Haven, Connecticut; Political parties; Speeches, addresses, etc.


Letter, Eli Thayer to Friend [John] Brown
Authors: Thayer, Eli , 1819-1899
Date: March 18, 1857
In this brief letter from Worcester, Mass., Eli Thayer wrote Brown with regard to his appearance at Concord and possibility of Brown coming to Worcester.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Massachusetts; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, Eli Thayer to Friend [John] Brown
Authors: Thayer, Eli , 1819-1899
Date: March 19, 1857
In this brief follow up to his March 18 letter, Eli Thayer wrote Brown to say that "next Monday" would be a good time for Brown's speech on "the free State Cause of Kansas which is the Cause of mankind" in Worcester.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Worcester, Massachusetts


Speech, John Brown
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: ca. March 1857
During the spring of 1857, John Brown traveled to several Northeastern cities (specifically, in Brown's home state of Connecticut) to solicit financial support for the Kansas crusade. In the speech delivered from these handwritten notes, Brown outlined some of the many sacrifices he and others had made to give his audience a sense of what was needed and discussed the unfolding situation in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Buford expedition; Cato, Sterling G.; Crops; Finance; Free state cause; Hartford, Connecticut; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Osawatomie, Battle of; Proslavery activities; Speeches, addresses, etc.


Speech of Hon. Reuben E. Fenton of New York, "The Designs of the Slave Power"
Authors: Fenton, Reuben E.
Date: February 24, 1858
Representative Reuben Fenton, of New York, delivered this speech on the floor of the House of Representatives, in reaction to the Congressional debate over the validity of the Lecompton Constitution. Believing that the repeal of the Missouri Compromise was a mistake, meant to allow the extension of slavery into the new territories, Fenton emphasized that their forefathers recognized that slavery and anti-slavery men could not coexist. Thus, under the authority outlined in the Constitution, slavery in all Territories should be abolished, in line with the Federal Government's duty to "install a government [in the Territories] conducive to the greatest degree of happiness and welfare" of its residents. Fenton did not believe that the Lecompton Constitution represented the will of Kansas' citizens, insisting that the majority, as free state supporters, were proposing no challenge to the Government constructed by the founding fathers.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Dred Scott decision; Fenton, Reuben E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lecompton Constitution; Missouri compromise; New York; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Speeches, addresses, etc.


Speech of Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina on the Admission of Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.

Keywords: Adams, Zu; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Business enterprises; Hammond, James H.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; South Carolina; Southerners; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Territorial government


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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