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6 results for Southerners:
Letter, [Josiah Miller] to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: January 25, 1856
Josiah Miller, responding to his family's concerns about traveling West, wrote to his Father and Mother in South Carolina. He told them that they would be better off leaving the South, and that they should begin their travels west as soon as they were ready, in spite of any violent conflict that might be taking place in Kansas Territory. Miller referred to a specific incident occurring a few days earlier on January 17, when free state men, on their way home from an election of State officers under the Topeka Constitution, were attacked by a group of Missourians. Miller also communicated that, although he was a free state man, he did not like the "Yankees' " approach to the conflict with the proslavery supporters.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Brown, Reese P.; Emigration and immigration; Free state perspective; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Josiah; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; South Carolina; Southerners


Speech, David R. Atchison to Pro-Slavery "Soldiers"
Authors: Atchison, David R.; Root, Joseph Pomeroy
Date: May 21, 1856
According to a note on the top of page one made later by R. J. Hinton, "this report was made for me [Hinton] by or under the direction of Lt. Gov. (Dr.) Root [Joseph Pomeroy Root, subsequently elected the state's first lieutenant governor under the Wyandotte Constitution], who was a prisoner, heard & reported the speech" made by David Atchison to the assembled proslave "Soldiers" camped two miles west of Lawrence before they marched on and sacked the town on May 21, 1856. The transcript is labeled "Hon. David R. Atchison's Speech . . ." and begins, "This is the most glorious day of my life! This day I am a border-ruffian!" Amidst "Yells" and "Cheers," Atchison rallied the "true sons of the noble South," encouraging them to "tear down their Free State Hotel" and "thow into the Kanzas their printing presses," and to bravely follow their "worthy . . . Leader, Col. [John H.] Stringfellow!"

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Beecher Bibles; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Free State Hotel; Free state settlers; Free state supporters; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Newspapers - Free State; Pierce administration; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Southerners; Stringfellow, John H.


The voice of Kansas; let the South respond.
Authors: Anderson, Joseph C.; Atchison, David R.; Boone, Albert G.; Buford, Jefferson ; Russell, William ; Stringfellow, B. F.
Date: June 24, 1856
The Law and Order Party made this appeal to southerners to provide support for the proslavery cause in Kansas, in the form of emigration, financial donations, and/or moral support. The text of the main portion of this pamphlet was written by David Atchison,William H. Russell, Joseph C. Anderson, A. G. Boone, B. J. Stringfellow, and J. Buford. A printed note at the end of the text was addressed to Col Jefferson Buford and encouraged him to go to the South to solicit support for the proslavery advocates in Western Missouri and Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Anderson, Joseph C.; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Boone, Albert G.; Buford, Jefferson; Law and Order Party; Proslavery; Proslavery support; Russell, William H (of Russell, Majors and Waddell); Southern emigrants; Southerners; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.


Letter, B. Darrach to Rev. S. L. Adair
Authors: Darrach, Barstow
Date: December 17, 1856
Doctor B. Darrach wrote from the New York Hospital and commented on published reports that imply that prospects for Kansas becoming a free state are improving. Darrach shared his thoughts on Republicans and Democrats at the national level and also on reactions of southerners. Darrach also described his personal plans that will prevent him from returning to Kansas.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Darrach, Barstow; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state perspective; New York; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Southerners


Letter, A. Pierse to Dear Sir [Eli Thayer]
Authors: Pierse, A.
Date: March 31, 1857
A. Pierse wrote from Washington, D.C. to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pierse was born in North Carolina and lived most of his life in the South but had been living in Minnesota Territory for the past seven years. He told Thayer that he planned to move to Kansas in the spring of 1857. Pierse offered Thayer his opinion on what free state supporters should do in Kansas Territory. He informed Thayer that, although he had "Southern opinions on the subject of slavery" and believed the federal government had no right to prohibit slavery in the territories, he was "without prejudice for or against either side" in the debate over slavery in Kansas Territory. Pierse suggested that the best course for free staters to take would be to accept the Dred Scott decision, actively participate in the political process in Kansas Territory, and work for the admission of Kansas as a state with or without slavery. Once Kansas was admitted, he contended, free state supporters would be on firmer legal ground to advocate for the prohibition of slavery, since it was generally accepted that "the people have the power to prohibit slavery in their state." He concluded by stating that once Kansas was a state, free staters could make the case that property would be worth 3 or 4 times more if slavery was prohibited in the state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Dred Scott decision; Free state prospects; Pierse, A.; Proslavery perspective; Slavery; Southern emigrants; Southerners; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Speech of Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina on the Admission of Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.

Keywords: Adams, Zu; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Business enterprises; Hammond, James H.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; South Carolina; Southerners; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Territorial government


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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