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8 results for South Carolina:
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Speech of Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina on the Admission of Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.

Keywords: Adams, Zu; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Business enterprises; Hammond, James H.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; South Carolina; Southerners; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Territorial government


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Wm [William Goodnow] to Dear Brother [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: December 22, 1860
William Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his brother Isaac Goodnow, updating him on personal and business matters. He reported that the plastering and joint work in the College building was mostly done, and that he had ceased to work on the construction of their own new house until the spring. Responding to the secession of South Carolina, William exclaimed that the Union had been "smashed into a cocked hat!" He added that the Denison family was well but for colds, and confirmed that those settlers who had suffered on account of the drought and poor economic conditions were receiving aid.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Construction; Denison, Joseph; Economic conditions; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Health; Relief; School buildings; Secession; South Carolina


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