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15 results for Sickness (see Illness):
Letter, [Hiram Hill] to Dear Wife
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 7, 1855
Hiram Hill of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife while traveling up the Missouri River from St. Louis to Kansas City. Hill was a free soil sympathizer evidentially traveling with a company of like-minded settlers, for he wrote that some steamboat passengers viewed the company with "rather suspitious eyes." Hill told his wife not to worry although one family had cholera and, on another boat, fifteen had died the previous week. The letter, written hastily in pencil, is not signed.

Keywords: Diseases; Hill, Hiram; Missouri River; Sickness (see Illness); Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: November 31, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Lexi[ng]ton, Missouri to his wife in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. The low river had forced him and other steamboat passengers to come ashore 25 miles short of Lexington. Once there, he heard rumors of war, reporting that Missourians "all armed to the teeth" were entering the Territory. Hill was sick and wished to turn back, but fellow travelers Mr. Whitney and Judge Johnson planned to continue. Hill included a brief message for his adopted son, Arthur.

Keywords: Hill, Hiram; Religion; Sickness (see Illness); Steamboats; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Whitney, Thaddeus L.


Letter, Your Affectionate Son & brother [John Brown, Jr.?] to Dear Father [John Brown] & Brother
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: September 8, 1856
Still in the custody of territorial officials, John Brown, Jr., wrote to express his remorse upon learning of the death of his brother Frederick--at least he was relieved to learn that his father and Jason were safe, as early reports had them dead or missing. "Poor Frederick has perished in a good cause!" wrote John, Jr., "the success of which cause I trust will yet bring joy to millions." He then wrote of his forthcoming trial and possible plan to "escape in case it should appear best."

Keywords: Blood, James; Brown, Frederick; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Wealthy; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Free state cause; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Missourians; Osawatomie, Battle of; Sickness (see Illness); United States. District Court (Kansas Territory)


Letter, W. F. M. Arny to Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Arny, W F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881
Date: October 23, 1856
W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Chicago, Illinois; Clothing and dress; Economic conditions; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Election, Presidential, 1856; Firearms; Food; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Guns; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Illness; Kansas Central Committee; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Money; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Relief funds; Sickness (see Illness); Topeka, Kansas; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


Testimony of Capt. S. T. Shore
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 2, 1856
This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856. Yet, while he was active in the free state cause, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the territory. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

Keywords: Agriculture; Crops; Grain; Livestock; Ottawa Creek, Kansas Territory; Shore, Samuel T.; Sickness (see Illness)


Kansas Experiences of A.R. Scolen, William Reap, Ephraim Coy, and Capt. Samuel Anderson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 21, 1856 - December 23, 1856
These testimonies were collected from a number of free state settlers along Pottawatomie Creek, presumably by an associate of the National Kansas Committee. Each account includes personal information about the settler (their origins, family, crops, etc.) and also testimonies of their involvement in the free state militia.

Keywords: Agriculture; Anderson, Samuel; Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, Jr.; Casualties; Cline, Captain; Clothing and dress; Coy, Ephraim; Crops; Food; Free state activities; Free state cause; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Illness; Livestock; Militia; Missourians; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Reap, William; Scolen, A.R.; Shore, Samuel T.; Sickness (see Illness); Skirmishing; Travel; Wounds and injuries


Kansas Experience of Charles E. Dewey
Authors: Dewey, Charles E.
Date: December 24, 1856
In this testimony, Charles E. Dewey described how his family and others in their party traveled to Kansas from Ohio. The group sought advice from S. C. Pomeroy about where to settle, and at his urging, they located on South Pottawatomie Creek, possibly in Anderson County. He included in this testimony the names and stories of people that he encountered on his journey and during his early years in the territory. One particularly interesting account was the conflict between a group of Germans and Dewey's party over possession of land claims. Dewey also included details of the difficulties for settlers in Kansas Territory during the years 1855 and 1856. Furthermore, within this testimony he states the experiences of the Winkly brothers who were boarding with him.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Claims (see Damage claims or Land claims); Crops; Dewey, Charles E.; Emigration and immigration; Germans; Health; Illness; Land claim disputes; Land claims; Livestock; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Transportation; Weather


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: May 20, 1857
On May 20, 1857, Kagi wrote his sister from Lawrence, explaining that he had been sick with the measles for some time but was now just busy writing for the newspaper and "preparing laws for the Free State Legislature," which was scheduled to convene in June. "We shall try hard to put the State Government into operation."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Free state activities; Free state cause; Free state legislature; Illness; Kagi, John Henry; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness)


Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear Brother"
Authors: Anderson, J. G.
Date: August 23, 1857
Writing to his brother from Barnesville (Bourbon County) on August 28, 1857, Jeremiah Goldsmith Anderson, a native of Indiana and follower of James Montgomery in southeast Kansas, described a variety of mundane matters regarding conditions in Kansas, including land claims and the construction of a steam sawmill on the river.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; County seats; Crops; Farmers; Free state settlers; Missouri; Proslavery settlers; Sawmills; Sickness (see Illness); Timber claim


Letter, S. [Samuel] L. Adair to Mr. J. B. [John Brown]
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: October 2, 1857
Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Daily life; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state prospects; Free state support; Health; Land claims; Lecompton Land Office; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Preemption law United States; Proslavery supporters; Sickness (see Illness); Slave power; Tabor, Iowa; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, W. B. Edmonds [E. B. Whitman?] to Hawkins [John Brown]
Authors: Edmonds, W. B.; Whitman, E. B.
Date: October 5, 1857
From Lawrence, October 5, 1857 (election day), "W. B. Edmonds" (appears to have been assumed name of E. B. Whitman) wrote to tell Brown that he hoped to see Brown in Kansas "soon," but he was unable to fulfill all Brown's requests, for funds and teams--the latter being especially hard to come by.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Edmonds, W. B.; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Finance; Free state prospects; Hawkins, N.; Horses; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Panic of 1857; Sickness (see Illness); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister, and Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 23, 1858
From Lawrence, Kagi wrote that he had spent several weeks at Osawatomie caring for "Old B." [John Brown], who had "now quite recovered." Things were hard right then, but Kagi was confident that "better times [were] dawning" and that his reward would certainly come "in the end," since "the success of [their] great cause" was "drawing very near." "Few of my age have toiled harder or suffered more in this cause than I, and yet I regret nothing that I have done; nor am I in any discouraged at the future."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Health; Kagi, John Henry; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, L. [Leigh] R. Webber to Miss Brown [daughter of John Stillman Brown]
Authors: Webber, L. R.
Date: October 22, 1859
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown. Webber wrote about sickness in the Brown family and about other personal matters, such as her father's work as a minister. He also kept her apprised of politics, both in Kansas and on the national scene, and spoke briefly of John Brown's "insane undertaking."

Keywords: Brown, John S.; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fires; Illness; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Religion; Sickness (see Illness); Slave power; Webber, Leigh R.


Letter, A. Venard, MD to Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Venard, A.
Date: October 3, 1860
This letter is from A. Venard, a medical doctor from Pleasant Grove, Kansas Territory who wrote to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter dealt with the sickness and disease that plagued the settlers along the Verdigris River in southeast Kansas. Dr. Venard had worked diligently to aid the settlers, even using funds from his own pocket to purchase medicine, but he requested that the committee give him 100 dollars worth of drugs. Attached to this letter is an itemized listing of the drugs that he would like to be purchased with those funds.

Keywords: Diseases; Health; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Medicine; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Sickness (see Illness); Vegetables; Venard, A.


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to James Buchanan
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: October 16, 1860
Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to the President of the United States in an effort to obtain assistance for the suffering inhabitants of Kansas. He described in detail the needs of the settlers, including their lack of adequate winter clothing and the scarcity of food. According to his personal observations, Hyatt concluded that the only options left to Kansas settlers were exodus or starvation. He also asked that all government lands be removed from the market, especially those in the New York Indian Reserve.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Diseases; Droughts; Economic conditions; Famines; Food; Health; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Indian reserves; Relief; Sickness (see Illness)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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