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8 results for Secession:
Pamphlet, "The Coming Struggle: or, Shall Kansas Be a Free or Slave State?"
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This pamphlet, authored anonymously by "One of the People" directs the question "Slavery or Liberty?" primarily to a Northern audience. The context of the argument supports Kansas achieving status as a free state, though it pointedly states that "the Free States desire not to control the internal arrangements of their sister States; but while they are willing that State rights should be respected, they will not submit to the nationalization of Slavery".

Keywords: Catholic Church; Democratic Party (U.S.); Missouri compromise; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Secession; Sectionalism (United States); Slavery


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 7, 1860
From Washington, D.C., December 7, 1860, Charles Robinson wrote his wife regarding the likelihood of secession and the government's response should this happen. He expected Kansas to be admitted to the Union, perhaps as soon as some of the Southern states withdrew their members from the Senate, and also believe the chances were good that Congress would authorize payment of Kansas' claims against the government for damages--such payments would provide some help for those presently in need of relief assistance.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Railroad land grants; Relief; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Secession; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; United States. Congress


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1860
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the political situation there. Marcus suspected that an organization existed, on the part of Virginia and Maryland, to block the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, and stated that, if the national situation did not better itself, that he had "no doubt that he [Lincoln] will sacrifice his life" improving it. He added that economic conditions were poor, and that many Congressmen were left unpaid.

Keywords: Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Economic conditions; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Secession; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Wm [William Goodnow] to Dear Brother [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: December 22, 1860
William Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his brother Isaac Goodnow, updating him on personal and business matters. He reported that the plastering and joint work in the College building was mostly done, and that he had ceased to work on the construction of their own new house until the spring. Responding to the secession of South Carolina, William exclaimed that the Union had been "smashed into a cocked hat!" He added that the Denison family was well but for colds, and confirmed that those settlers who had suffered on account of the drought and poor economic conditions were receiving aid.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Construction; Denison, Joseph; Economic conditions; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Health; Relief; School buildings; Secession; South Carolina


Letter, James Montgomery to F. B. Sanborn
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: January 14, 1861
Just two weeks before Kansas would be admitted to the Union and in the midst of the early secession crisis, Montgomery (Mound City) told Franklin B. Sanborn (Boston) that he (Montgomery) did not favor an invasion of "the slave states so long as they keep themselves at home," but Missouri was crossing the line and interfering in Kansas affairs. He also commented on recent mob violence in Boston and General Harney's futile efforts to enforce the Fugitive Slave law in southern Kansas.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Democratic Party (U.S.); Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Harney, William S.; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Martial law; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Secession; Slavery


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: January 19, 1861
In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Anderson, Major Robert; Divorce; Divorce law and legislation; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lawrence; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Secession; Sectionalism (United States)


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1861
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C. to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Ohio. Marcus began his letter berating his brother for his inconsistent correspondence; he himself, though very busy, managed to write Edwin regularly. Marcus also voiced his frustration with Congress, declaring this to be his last week as a Delegate, and predicted that both Republicans' and Democrats' stubbornness would cause the country to permanently divide. Kansas would become a state on January 29, only three days later.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Blair, Frank; Brown, Thomas; Democratic Party (U.S.); National politics; Ohio; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Secession; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.