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215 results for Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894:
Advertisement, Kansas Land Trust Co.
Authors: Kansas Land Trust Company
Date: Undated
This advertisement, presumably created by the Kansas Land Trust Company, lists thirty main points about Kansas Territory, including the advantages of settling in Kansas and general statistics about the territory. It also mentions the town of Quindaro and its growing influence in the area along the Kansas River. For those interested in obtaining tickets, the advertisement furnished the address of the New England Emigrant Aid Society. The bottom of the flyer provided the names of the officers that were involved in the company and their contact information.

Keywords: Advertisements; Boston, Massachusetts; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Kansas Land Trust Company; Land; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Settlement; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Skilled workers; Walker, Joel


Letter, Sarah [presumably Sarah T. D. Lawrence] to My Dear Mrs. [William B.] Stowe
Authors: Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: January 9 1851
This letter, written by Sarah [presumably would be Sarah T.D. Lawrence, Charles Robinson's future wife] from Belchertown, MA, to Mrs. William B. Stowe, in West Brookfield, MA, contains excerpts of a letter written by Charles Robinson to Sarah. Robinson described his conditions of imprisonment in California (where he had traveled prior to settling in Kansas); he had been jailed for supporting squatter's rights and anti-slavery causes. He makes reference to a Dr. J.G. Holland, who had been a friend and colleague of his at home in Massachusetts.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; California; Massachusetts; National politics; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Squatter sovereignty


Deed of Caleb S. Pratt for Charles Robinson
Authors: Pratt, Caleb S.
Date: October 13, 1853
This handwritten deed entitled Charles Robinson to the ownership of a house and farm claim south of the town of Lawrence, which was previously owned by Caleb Pratt.

Keywords: Emery, James Stanley; Emigration and immigration; Land acquisition; Legal documents; Lykins, William H. R.; Pratt, Caleb S.; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Settlement


List of Subscriptions to Stock of the Massachusetts and New England Emigrant Aid Companies
Authors: New England Emigrant Aid Company
Date: May 1854 - June 1855
This volume includes lists of subscribers to shares of stock in the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company and the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The reports list the name of the subscriber, place of residence, number of shares, total value of shares, and when the subscriber paid for the shares. Subscribers included Amos A. Lawrence, Eli Thayer, Charles Francis Adams, Moses Kimball, and Charles Robinson. The volume also includes a list of donors to the company.

Keywords: Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Finance; Kimball, Moses, 1809-1895; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stock certificates; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Mr. [Amos Adams] Lawrence
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 22, 1854
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Samuel Pomeroy wrote from a settlement, which would come to be called Lawrence, in Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Lawrence was an investor who sponsored the emigrant group who would settle the town of Lawrence. Pomeroy reported that Charles Robinson had been elected President of the Lawrence Association, the first governing body of the town. He was enthusiastic about the abundance of timber resources in the area, which, once secured from the Indians, would make for a good business enterprise. Emigrants were arriving in droves, filling the hotels and increasing demand for land claims. Though he remained positive, Pomeroy warned "Don't make yourselves believe that the slave holders have given up Kansas!" and anticipated a political battle during the upcoming Territorial Legislature election.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Branscomb, Charles H.; Business enterprises; Elections; Emigration and immigration; Hotels; Illness; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Timber; Town development


Letter, C. Robinson to A. A. Lawrence Esq.
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: October 16, 1854
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society.Charles Robinson wrote from Kansas Territory to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson recounted to Lawrence the recent discussion of the new settlement's name, believing "Wakarusa" to be inappropriate and rejecting the names of Eastern cities already in existence. There appeared to be unanimous support for the name "Lawrence", which had fallen into common use, though it had not been officially adopted. Robinson advised Lawrence that a naming committee would be in contact with him soon to give him formal notice of the adoption of "Lawrence" as the settlement's official name.

Keywords: Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lum, S. Y; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Town development


Letter, C. Robinson to A. A. Lawrence Esq.
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 18, 1854
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson thanked Lawrence for his unfailing support of the enterprise of the Territory and claimed his devotion to work done in his interest. He discussed Lawrence's development, having secured the offices of three free state newspapers, but expressed anxiety about the upcoming territorial election. However, Robinson vowed that his men would not resort to fraudulent voting to win the majority over proslavery supporters.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Business enterprises; Election fraud; Elections; Elliott, Robert G.; Lawrence buildings; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Newspapers; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sawmills; Speer, John, 1817-1906; Town development


Report of the Committee of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company
Authors: Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company
Date: 1854
This report, issued by the founders of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company, devotes itself in part to communicating the objectives and mission of the Company, which primarily was to protect persons emigrating West from scams and other "knavery". The report also includes a few journal-style entries by Charles Robinson regarding his experiences in Nebraska and Kansas in 1849. Following Robinson's accounts are various excerpted newspaper articles and letters endorsing the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company.

Keywords: Bullock, Alexander H.; Business enterprises; Clapp, Otis; Emigration and immigration; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Kansas Territory; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; Nebraska Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Wade, Edward


Charter, Officers, and Objects of the Company
Authors: New England Emigrant Aid Company
Date: c. 1855
This charter of the New England Emigrant Aid Company lists officers, directors, members of the executive committee and information about the stock of the New England Emigrant Aid Company.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Branscomb, Charles H.; Cabot, Samuel; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stock certificates; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


Territorial Census, 1855, District 1
Authors: Babcock, Carmi William
Date: January-February, 1855
This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 1, the place of election was the office of Dr. Charles Robinson in Lawrence. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the First District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, on the south bank of the Kansas River; thence along the south bank of said river to the first tributary or watered ravine running into the Kansas above the town of Lawrence, thence up that tributary to the head thereof; thence in a direct line to the west side of __Rolf's house; thence, by a due south line, to the Santa Fe Road; thence by the middle of said road to the Missouri State line; and thence by said State line to the place of beginning."

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Census; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Worcester County Kanzas League promotional brochure
Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909
Date: February 13, 1855
This circular letter was written by Edward E. Hale on behalf of the Worcester County Kanzas League. It was probably affiliated with the New England Emigrant Aid Company as many of the officers are the same. The document provided detailed information about how emigrants would get to Kansasand tips for settling once they got there. He also provided information on how to support the League through the purchase of stock.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Branscomb, Charles H.; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Railroads; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.; Worcester County Kansas League; Worcester, Massachusetts


Minutes, New England Emigrant Aid Company Annual Meetings
Authors: New England Emigrant Aid Company
Date: March 5, 1855 - May 29, 1860
Proceedings of the New England Emigrant Aid Company stockholders meetings. The meetings typically involved the election of officers, a treasurer's report, consideration of resolutions, and an assessment of the company's prospects in Kansas. The minutes for the first meeting of the New England Emigrant Aid Company (March 5, 1855) included the corporation by-laws.

Keywords: Antislavery movements; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Higginson, Charles J.; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Minutes; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


List of passengers for Kansas composing the first party 1855 under charge of Dr. Charles Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 13, 1855
This list contained the name of the head of the family and may also include occupations, ages, familial relationships and a location for each individual or family group that was a member of the March 13, 1855 party. The list also indicated the amount of payment made.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, C. Robinson to E. Thayer
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: April 2, 1855
Charles Robinson, writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts, described voting irregularities in the March 30, 1855 election of members to the territorial legislature. Robinson maintained that the election was "controlled entirely by Missourians" who came to the territory, took over the polling places, and cast illegal ballots to ensure that proslavery supporters were elected to the legislature. Robinson also reported that free staters in Lawrence had formed themselves into four military companies, and urged Thayer to send Sharps rifles and cannons for these forces.

Keywords: Cannons; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, March 1855; Free state perspective; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, C. Robinson to Rev. E. E. Hale
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: April 9, 1855
Charles Robinson, writing from Lawrence, K. T. to Edward Everett Hale, commented that Free State supporters were forming military companies in response to perceived "outrageous conduct" by Missourians during the March 30, 1855, election of representatives for the territorial legislature. Robinson asked Hale to send two hundred Sharp's rifles and two cannon for the use of Lawrence settlers.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Cannons; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Elections; Free state; Guns; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Proslavery activities; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, C. [Charles] Robinson to Mr. [Eli] Thayer
Authors: Branscomb, Charles H.; Robinson, Charles
Date: July 26, 1855
Charles Robinson, free state leader and activist, wrote to Eli Thayer, organizer of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, introducing James Abbott to him. Robinson described Abbott as trustworthy and "true as steel to the cause of Freedom in Kansas". He also expressed to Thayer that the rifles previously shipped to Lawrence had had a "very good effect", and suggested he procure more. At the end of Robinson's letter, Charles Branscomb, Secretary pro tempore of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, endorsed Robinson, an agent for the Company, and his support of Abbott.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Branscomb, Charles H.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles


Journal. Miscellaneous Records of the Free State Executive Committee
Authors: Goodin, Joel Kishler
Date: 1855-1856
This journal, compiled by Joel K. Goodin, secretary of the Executive Committee of the Topeka free-state movement, began with a statement explaining the reason the Topeka Movement formed and the call for a Mass Meeting at Big Springs, August 15, 1855. It included notes of numerous meetings, proclamations, etc. These committee records were published in their entirety in the Kansas Historical Collections Vol. 13:125-158.

Keywords: Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Goodin, Joel Kishler; Journals; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. Robinson to Dear Sir [T. W. Higginson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: August 27, 1855
This letter, written by free state governor Charles Robinson, was sent to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a prominent Northern abolitionist. Robinson discussed in rather general terms the troubles facing Kansas, stating that he believed this struggle did not only involve Kansas, "but I regard it as one in which the whole nation is involved." Robinson also expressed doubts that the North would support the free state settlers in the territory, writing that they can only "hope" for reinforcements, not take them for granted. He asked Higginson to stir up Northerners against the bogus legislature, and made mention of ex-Governor Reeder and opposition to the bogus legislature. In general, this letter eloquently demonstrates the passion of this free state leader and his dedication to the cause of liberty.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Bogus legislature; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state legislature; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee Manual Labor School


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: August 29, 1855
Josiah Miller, making arrangements for his parents' journey from South Carolina to Kansas Territory, wrote to his father and mother from his office at the Kansas Free State newspaper. He told them of his need to purchase personal arms for his own protection and described to them a recent situation of election fraud. Miller also wrote that his goal, as a newspaper editor, was to "move men to support the Free State ticket." He added that he was having a falling out with Robert Elliott, his business partner.

Keywords: Crops; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election fraud; Elliott, Robert G.; Free state activities; Kansas Free State (newspaper); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Newspapers; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.


Kansas A Free State. Squatter Sovereignty Vindicated! No White Slavery!
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: September 24, 1855
Broadside advertising a series of mass meetings in support of the free state cause, with Charles Robinson as the speaker. The original is on display in the Kansas Museum of History, Topeka, Kansas.

Keywords: Antislavery; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state cause; Goodin, Joel Kishler; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Speer, John, 1817-1906; Squatter sovereignty; Stewart, John E.


Letter, C. [Charles] Robinson to A. A. Lawrence
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 28, 1855
Charles Robinson, writing from Lawrence, K. T. to Amos A. Lawrence, expressed his optimism about the prospects of Kansas entering the union as a free state within one year. Robinson also informed Lawrence that he had drawn upon him for $1000 to cover New England Emigrant Aid Company expenses.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Free state perspective; Indian floats; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Legal Document, Abandonment of Land near Lawrence
Authors: Pratt, Caleb S.; Updegraff, E.
Date: October 15, 1855
This document dated October 15, 1855, and signed by Caleb S. Pratt, Levin B. Dennis, Joshia Smith, and R. T. Hooton, appeared to be their statement of abandonment for any claim to "lands situated in the vicinity of Lawrence" (640 acres) as defined within the agreement. It seemed that Charles Robinson was to locate "a Wyandotte Indian Float" on this same section of land.

Keywords: Dennis, Levin B.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Hooten, R. T.; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pratt, Caleb S.; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Joshia; Updegraff, E.; Wyandot Float; Wyandot Indians


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 26, 1855
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 26, 1855
On Friday, October 26, 1855, the convention conducted some routine business but also entertained a motion by Mark W. Delahay of Leavenworth: "Resolved--That this Convention, approve the principles of non intervention in the local affairs of Kansas, as enunciated by the 'Nebraska, Kansas Act,' and that this Convention recommend to the people of Kansas a strict observance of the principles laid down in said act." In other words, he opposed the creation of a provisional government to rival the federally recognized territorial government--see Delahay's speech on this subject, as reported in "Kansas Freeman," November 14, 1855. The resolution was tabled.

Keywords: Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Kansas Nebraska Act; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 26, 1855
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 26, 1855
During the afternoon session on Friday, October 26, 1855, the convention returned to the issue raised by Delahay that morning, among other more mundane matters.

Keywords: Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Kansas Freeman; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 30, 1855
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 30, 1855
During this session of the constitutional convention, delegates dealt briefly with the question of "an immediate organization of a State Government," a highly controversial issue, and considered a report on the militia. Lively debate on the latter issue seems to have followed, although not much detail is given here, with Charles Robinson offering an amendment "striking out the word white--" This presumably would have had the effect of making African Americans and Indians eligible for service, but the amendment failed seven to twenty-four.

Keywords: African Americans; Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Militia; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Suffrage; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory; Voting


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 31, 1855
During the afternoon session of Wednesday, October 31, 1855, Jim Lane presented a "Resolution which was ordered to be entered upon the Journal of the convention--said Resolution being the instructions given by the people of the 2nd Representative District" at a Lawrence meeting of October 7. The "instructions" and Lane's resolution provided that "the question of excluding Free Negroes from the Territory" be submitted to a vote of the people on the day they voted on the constitution itself.

Keywords: African Americans; Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Exclusion, African Americans; Free State Party; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, Afternoon Session
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: November 9, 1855
During the course of the proceedings recorded for the afternoon of November 9, 1855, discussion turned to the effort by Jim Lane to first include a provision for the "removal" of all blacks and then all "slaves" from Kansas by July 4, 1860. Charles Robinson supported an amendment which changed the effective date to July 4, 1857. All other provisions were to take effect immediately upon the adoption of the constitution.

Keywords: African Americans; Constitutions; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Exclusion, African Americans; Free State Party; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. Robinson to Capt. G. P. Lowrey
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 8, 1855
Charles Robinson, Commander-in-Chief of the free state military forces, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Grosvenor P. Lowry, captain of a free state militia regiment, instructing him to attach his command to the newly organized regiment under the command of James Lane, Robinson's second-in-command.

Keywords: Deitzler, George W.; Free state militia; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lowrey, G.P. (Grosvenor P.); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Wakarusa Treaty
Authors: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles ; Shannon, Wilson , 1802-1877
Date: December 8, 1855
A draft of an agreement between Governor Wilson Shannon, representing the territorial government, and Charles Robinson and James Lane, representing the free state movement, settling the dispute that resulted in the Wakarusa War. In essence, Robinson and Lane pledged to "aid in the execution of any legal process" against individuals involved in rescuing free state supporter Jacob Branson provided that these individuals received a hearing before a U.S. District Court judge. This compromise ended the Wakarusa War.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter/Order, Wilson Shannon to C. Robinson and J. H. Lane
Authors: Shannon, Wilson , 1802-1877
Date: December 9, 1855
According to D. W. Wilder, Governor Wilson Shannon arrived in Lawrence on December 7, 1855, and on December 8 made "a treaty with the Free-State Generals" ending the Wakarusa War. The paper was signed by Shannon, Robinson and Lane. With the document represented here, dated Lawrence, December 9, 1855, Governor Shannon "authorized & directed [Robinson and Lane] to take such measures & use the enrolled force under your command in such manner for the preservation of the peace & the protection of the persons & property of the people in Lawrence & vicinity as in your judgment shall best secure that end." ( A subsequent notation indicated that the order was written in Robinson's hand, but signed by Shannon.)

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Free state militia; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Certificate of Service, Franklin L. Crane, Jr.
Authors: Headquarters, Kansas Volunteers
Date: December 11, 1855
Franklin L. Crane, Jr., son of a prominent citizen in Topeka, served as a private from November 27 to Dec. 11, 1855 in defense of Lawrence. This certificate of service was signed by several people active in the free state cause, including James H. Lane and Charles Robinson.

Keywords: Certificates; Crane, Franklin L., Jr.; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Free state militia; Kansas Volunteers; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Military; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Certificate, Head Quarters Kansas Volunteers
Authors: Kansas Volunteers
Date: December 12, 1855
This certificate, signed by Charles Robinson and James Lane, was issued by the Head Quarters of the Kansas Volunteers, a Free state militia group led by Robinson. It documented Robert Gilbert's service "in defending the City of Lawrence. . .from demolition by foreign invaders" during the Wakarusa War. Gilbert had arrived in Kansas Territory only weeks before, having traveled from his native England.

Keywords: Battles; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Free state militia; Free state regiment; Gilbert, Robert L.; Hunt, Morris; Immigrants; Kansas Volunteers; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Wilder, Solomon


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 12, 1855
Hiram Hill arrived in Lawrence, Kansas Territory shortly after the end of the Wakarusa War. This letter to his wife reviewed the events of the war, made mention of women's assistance, described Hill's journey from Leavenworth with Mr. Conway, and gave an account of Thomas W. Barber's funeral, at which Charles Robinson and James Lane spoke. Barber was killed south of Lawrence on the 6th. Hill had met Mr. Whitney, Judge Johnson, Mr. Haskell, and Mr. Simpson, and planned to visit Charles Robinson. Hill also detailed Governor Shannon's settlement with free state leaders at Lawrence.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Funerals; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Town development; Travel; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Women


Daily diary, Isaac Goodnow
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: July 1855 - January 1856
Isaac Goodnow, a free state supporter and founder of Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, recorded news of political events and military skirmishes from July 1855-January 1856. Goodnow's diary makes mention of the details of his daily life, such as home maintenance, crop harvests, prairie fires, and extended illness.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Daily life; Denison, Joseph; Elections; Free state activities; Free state support; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Illness; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Schuyler, Philip Church; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Constitution; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Circular, Informational Letter regarding Emigration to Kansas
Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909
Date: 1855
Edward Hale was the author of this printed letter describing the services provided by the [New England] Emigrant Aid Company and the conditions of settlement in Kansas Territory. Hale included information regarding cost of travel and settlement, conditions of land acquisition, job opportunities, and relations with local Indians. He also addressed the slavery question, and already mentioned occurrences of election fraud on the part of proslavery supporters, but concluded that, in his own opinion "there is no danger whatever for Kanzas".

Keywords: Business enterprises; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Libraries; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Settlement; Slavery; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Travel; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


Circular letter from C. [Charles] Robinson to Dear Sir
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: 1855
Charles Robinson wrote this printed letter on behalf of the Free State Executive Committee of Kansas Territory. In it, he encouraged free state supporters to monitor the upcoming elections for delegate to Congress and for delegates to the constitutional convention to see that they were conducted fairly. He wanted them to note if non-residents were voting or serving as election officials and if residents were being prevented from voting. The circular encouraged free state voters to arrive at the polls early. J. K. Goodin was the secretary of the group. These elections were held under the auspices of the Topeka Movement.

Keywords: Election fraud; Elections; Free State Party; Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Goodin, Joel Kishler; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


People's Proclamation
Authors: Emery, James Stanley; Foster, Charles A.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Y.; Robinson, Charles ; Smith, George W.; Sylvester, S. D.; Wakefield, J. A.
Date: 1855
This broadside represented the efforts of free state supporters to encourage residents to vote in the election for the delegate to represent Kansas Territory in Congress that was held October 9, 1855. It listed the polling places, the instructions to judges, and the qualifications for "lawful" voters. This document was probably related to a circular letter signed by Charles Robinson that encouraged free state supporters to see that elections were conducted according to the printed procedures for both the election for delegates to Congress and for delegates to the constitutional convention. The broadside indicated that it had been signed by nearly 1000 persons but space allowed for the printing of the following names only: C. K Holliday, J. A. Wakefield, C. Robinson, J. H. Lane, C. A. Foster, M. J. Parrott, S. D. Sylvester, W. Y. Roberts, G. W. Smith and J. S. Emery. This election was held under the auspices of the Topeka Movement.

Keywords: Elections; Emery, James Stanley; Foster, Charles A.; Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Free state supporters; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Sylvester, S. D.; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Wakefield, John A.


Sheet Music, Gov. Robinson's Polka
Authors: Whitney, Andrew
Date: 1856
This is a copy of sheet music for a song played by the Fitchburg, Massachusetts Cornet Band. It was written by Andrew Whitney and " respectfully dedicated to his friend," Charles Robinson.

Keywords: Entertainment; Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Music; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Songs; Whitney, Andrew


Letter, J. H. Lane to Gov. of Minnesota [Willis A. Gorman]
Authors: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles
Date: January 22, 1856
This "Appeal of Gen. Lane & Gov. Robinson" to Willis A. Gorman, the territorial governor of Minnesota, was a call for assistance during Kansas Territory's present crisis: the territory face, wrote Lane and Robinson from Lawrence, K.T., on January 22, 1856, "an overwhelming force of the Citizens of Missouri" organized for invasion on the Missouri border.

Keywords: Free state cause; Gorman, Willis A.; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Minnesota; Missouri; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, [Josiah Miller] to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: January 25, 1856
Josiah Miller, responding to his family's concerns about traveling West, wrote to his Father and Mother in South Carolina. He told them that they would be better off leaving the South, and that they should begin their travels west as soon as they were ready, in spite of any violent conflict that might be taking place in Kansas Territory. Miller referred to a specific incident occurring a few days earlier on January 17, when free state men, on their way home from an election of State officers under the Topeka Constitution, were attacked by a group of Missourians. Miller also communicated that, although he was a free state man, he did not like the "Yankees' " approach to the conflict with the proslavery supporters.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Brown, Reese P.; Emigration and immigration; Free state perspective; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Josiah; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; South Carolina; Southerners


Letter, A. A. Lawrence to My dear Sir [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: January 31, 1856
From Boston, January 31, 1856, Amos Lawrence wrote to advise his friend Charles Robinson submit to the authority of recognized officers of the U.S. government, no matter how unjust their actions appeared. He suggested that Robinson follow the "Fabian policy" of non-violent, peaceful resistance, and do what he could to discourage "all aggression" on the part of free-state men.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Massachusetts; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slave power; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Excerpt from letter, I. T. G [Isaac Goodnow] to [unknown]
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: January/February 1856
In the wake of the Wakarusa War, Isaac Goodnow wrote to an unknown recipient regarding recent skirmishes and negotiations between proslavery and free state supporters. According to Goodnow, Governor Shannon had demanded that the free state men surrender their Sharp's rifles and obey the laws of the "bogus" legislature. Governor Robinson had responded, telling his men to "keep the rifles, but surrender their contents." Goodnow also commented on the "determined heroism" of the free state women, and recounted the incident of voter fraud which occurred in the Delegate to Congress election between former Governor Reeder and J. W. Whitfield.

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Bogus legislature; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Election fraud; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879; Women


Letter, M. W. Delahay to Genl. C. Robinson, Col. J. H. Lane & Others
Authors: Delahay, Mark W.
Date: February 16, 1856
From Washington, D.C., on February 16, 1856, Mark Delahay, the Free State Party's would be representative to the 34th Congress, wrote to his free state colleagues regarding President Franklin Pierce's directive to Governor Wilson Shannon. The latter was "to arrest and punish all who may take part in the making and putting inforce any law in oposition to the Territorial laws now upon the Statute Book." Delahay warned against "the organization of an independent State Government" and wrote "we are upon the brink of a crisis of serious import." (See D.W. Wilder, Annals of Kansas, 109-110.)

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Free state government; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. H. Reeder to Dear Doctor [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 16, 1856
From "Washington City" on February 16, 1856, former K.T. governor Andrew Reeder wrote Charles Robinson regarding his (Reeder's) efforts to influence Kansas policy in the nation's capital. Reeder was working through friends, since he no longer had personal influence with President Pierce, and he was not pleased with the president's February 11 proclamation, which he called "the low contemptible trickstering affair which might expected from Pierce, and is like the Special Message [of January 24] a slander on the Free State Party." Nevertheless, Reeder thought it could have been worse and insisted that Robinson and the other free-state leaders "should not organize the State Govt." Pierce would just use that action to justify aggressive moves to suppress the movement.

Keywords: Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Washington, D.C.


Letter, W. A. Gorman to Speaker of the House of Reps [Minnesota Territory]
Authors: Phillips, Wendell
Date: February 18, 1856
In response to a January 22, 1856, appeal from free-state leaders in Kansas, the governor of Minnesota Territory, Willis A. Gorman (St. Paul, February 18, 1856), conveyed the appeal to his territory's House of Representatives and encouraged Minnesota officials to follow a policy of "Non intervention." Governor Gorman refused to recognize Lane and Robinson as "officers in the Territory of Kansas, under any authority of the laws of the United States or of that Territory."

Keywords: Border ruffians; Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Gorman, Willis A.; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Josiah; Minnesota; Missouri; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Letter, A. H. Reeder to Dear Doctor [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 18, 1856
On February 18, 1856, a concerned former governor, Andrew Reeder, wrote Charles Robinson again from the nation's capital. Reeder advised Robinson of the current situation in Washington, D.C., and urged caution; Reeder believed the Topeka movement/legislature and Robinson must clearly state that they were organizing a "state government" solely for the purpose of being ready to assume authority if/when Congress admitted Kansas to the Union. Reeder believed the "state movement" was on solid constitutional ground if this was its official position in the meantime; they must not usurp the power and authority of the territorial government.

Keywords: Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Washington, D.C.


Certificate, Riley City Town Share
Authors: Riley City Town Company
Date: February 19, 1856
A typical, printed town share certificate, these two documents certified that "Dr. Chas Robinson" had two shares each of which was for "one share of six lots in the City of Riley, Kansas Territory." They were signed by John Westover and Robert Klotz at Riley City, February 19, 1856.

Keywords: Davis County, Kansas Territory; Geary County, Kansas; Riley City, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Town companies; Town shares


Washington Birth-Day Ball by the Kansas Rifles No. One.
Authors: Kansas Rifles No. One
Date: February 22, 1856
The Kansas Rifles No. One sponsored this ball to be held at the Free State Hotel in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, "in honor of the Day which gave birth to th Immortal Washington." The committee of arrangements consisted of J. W. Colburn, James H. Lane, A. Cutler, A. D. Searl, W. L. Brigden, Chas. Robinson, John G. Cropsker, James R. White, E. Emmerson, and B. F. Swift. Tickets to the event were $2.00.

Keywords: Balls (parties); Community life; Cutler, George A.; Daily life; Dance parties; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Hotel; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parties; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Searl, Albert D.


Organization of the Free State Government in Kansas with the Inaugural Speech and Message of Governor Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 4, 1856
This pamphlet provides a vivid description of the scene, players, and proceedings of the initial sessions of the Free State Government convened in Topeka. From Governor Charles Robinson's inaugural speech, the intent of the new Legislature was clear: they convened in order to formulate a State government which would serve their political interests and would reflect the principle of "squatter [popular] sovereignty", since the existing Territorial government was merely provisional and furthermore did not advance their free-state aspirations.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Free state legislature; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Squatter sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Journal, House of Representatives, Topeka (1856)
Authors: Goodin, Joel Kishler
Date: 1856-1857
This Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Kansas was, apparently, the original record of the Free State Provisional Government of Kansas, which was organized at the Big Springs Convention September 5, 1855. Joel K. Goodin was chief clerk of the House and felt the journal was "a flat contradiction of the pro-slavery inuendo, that we were all abolitionists from Boston, Massachusetts, and hired to come to Kansas by the Emigrant Aid Society." The first two pages of the original bound journal have been scanned. The original is oversized with the pages measuring 9.5 inches wide and 14 inches high. The journal, as published in its entirety in the Kansas Historical Collections volume 13 pages 166-249, follows the two pages from the original.

Keywords: Free State Party; Free state government; Free state legislature; Goodin, Joel Kishler; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Prohibition; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. House


Minutes, Free State Legislature
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 6, 1856
The minutes of the Topeka free state legislature's meeting on March 6, 1856 was published in the Kansas Daily Tribune on the next day, March 7, 1856. The Senate primarily discussed admission to the Union and whether or not the decisions of the territorial legislature should supercede those of the United States Congress. The House of Representatives discussed the national government's stance on the murder of Thomas Barber and decided to draft a document listing the grievances of the people of Kansas. The speaker of the House also announced the members of the various standing committees. Lastly, the House resolved that all laws passed by this body would become effective once Kansas entered the Union.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Brown, Reese P.; Curtiss, John; Free state legislature; Minutes; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature); United States. Congress


Letter, J.C. Fremont to Gov. Charles Robinson
Authors: Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890
Date: March 17, 1856
From New York, on March 17, 1856, three months before accepting the Republican Party nomination for president, John C. Fremont wrote this letter of support and encouragement to Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas. The two men had participated together in the political affairs of California a few years earlier, and Fremont compared the current controversy over the "Kansas question" with the previous incident. Fremont only briefly addressed Robinson's questions about a possible presidential bid.

Keywords: Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; New York; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Army


Letter, N. P. Banks to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Banks, Nathaniel Prentice, 1816-1894
Date: March 19, 1856
U. S. Congressman Nathaniel P. Banks of Massachusetts wrote Robinson from Washington on March 19, 1856, to forward John Fremont's letter (see document, #101103) and to encourage that letter's publication in Kansas Territory. The newly elected speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives believed Fremont was a good friend of Kansas and that he would make a solid, electable candidate for president. Banks also wrote that he was "hopeful the Kansas question will meet its first decision in the House this week." He was confident something positive would be done for the cause. (Perhaps he was speaking of the Howard Committee, which was authorized that very day.)

Keywords: Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894; Congressional Report 200 (see also Howard Committee); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Kansas question; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. House; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Thomas Webb, Boston, Massachusetts to J. S. Emery, Brandon, Vt.
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: April 4, 1856
Emery was in New England and Webb was informing him of various places in Maine and New Hampshire that would like someone from Kansas to speak to them. Webb informed Emery that the group in New Hampshire was interested in securing recruits to go to Kansas but that Emery's principal purpose was to raise money for the Relief Fund. He wrote Emery that the sponsoring group should cover his expenses, that they should take contributions at any public meeting and that they should establish a committee for soliciting funds locally. Webb also described an incident where Missourians seized a box they thought contained weapons, but it housed a rosewood piano. Webb also mentioned that Charles Robinson was in Washington, D. C.

Keywords: Emery, James Stanley; Free state activities; Furniture; Massachusetts; Proslavery activities; Relief; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 9, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent events, which were "unfathomably deep in the waters of territorial trouble". He described the movement of armed men towards Lawrence, a mix of U.S. troops and militiamen from Missouri. Marcus also referred to the current situations of Robinson, Reeder, Lane, and other men who were to play important roles in the imminent Sack of Lawrence. Despite these threats, Marcus still commented on his own economic situation and again asked for money from his brother and father.

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Telegraph; Town development


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory to his brother, Edwin Parrott, updating him on the situation in K.T. in the days leading up to the Sack of Lawrence. Marcus told him of attempts to arrest both Andrew Reeder and Charles Robinson, and how Reeder claimed that he was privileged from arrest. He also discussed the movement of the troops and his plans to visit Neosho in the coming few days, provided that the political tensions subside.

Keywords: Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Missouri River; Neosho River, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 15, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote to his brother, Edwin Parrott, from Leavenworth, K.T. He told Edwin that the border ruffians had made their first move into Lawrence the night before, defeating the "Lawrence party". Marcus added that morale in the town was exceptionally low after the departure of both Reeder and Robinson, and believed that the two men, plus the editors of the "Herald of Freedom" and the "Kansas Free State" were imprisoned. He also believed that, this victory gone to the border ruffians, with the support of Governor Shannon, the free soilers would be cleansed from the area.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Buford expedition; Free soil; Miller, Josiah; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Platte County, Missouri; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912


Letter, G. P. Lowrey to Dear Madam [Sarah Robinson]
Authors: Lowrey, G.P. (Grosvenor P.)
Date: May 24, 1856
Grosvenor Lowrey, having recently gone into hiding near Hudson, Michigan, wrote to Sarah Robinson, Charles Robinson's wife. Lowrey told her of her husband's arrest which, as he reported, was for "conniving the assault against Jones" (Sheriff Jones) instead of under charges of high treason. Lowrey offered himself in service to both of the Robinsons, available upon their request.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Jenkins, Gaius; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Lowrey, G.P. (Grosvenor P.); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856


Letter, Jas Finley to Dear Sister
Authors: Finley, James Agnew
Date: May 24, 1856
James A. Finley, a Lawrence resident at the time of the Sack of Lawrence, wrote to his sister recounting the events that had transpired only three days before. Concisely but vividly he described events as they unfolded from the morning of May 21st, when David Atchison "planted 2 cannon upon the hill above town." Finley, a more fortunate man than many in Lawrence that day, claimed to have suffered no losses in the incident.

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Deitzler, George W.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Eldridge House; Finley, James Agnew; Free state perspective; Guns; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Smith, George W.; United States marshals; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, M. S. Cecilia Sherman To Mrs. [Sara] Robinson
Authors: Sherman, Margaret S. C.
Date: May 25, 1856
Margaret Sarah Cecilia (Mrs. John) Sherman wrote Sara Robinson on May 25, 1856, regarding Governor Robinson's captivity to date. He had been arrested on May 10 at Lexington, Missouri, and subsequently returned to the territory. At this time he was being held in Leavenworth, where Sherman and many other of Robinson's friends had the opportunity to visit with him, and Sherman was able to attest to his good treatment. She makes interesting, favorable reference to Robinson's stay in Lexington and to "Captain [John W.] Martin of the Kickapoo rangers," who "seemed to have charge" of the governor in Leavenworth. (Congressman John Sherman of Ohio was the brother of William T. Sherman, later of Leavenworth, and a member of the Howard Committee, investigating the Kansas affair.)

Keywords: Damage claims; Free state cause; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lexington, Missouri; Martin, John W.; Preston, Colonel; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sherman, John, 1823-1900


Letter, S. P. Hanscom to Mrs. Sara T. D. Robinson
Authors: Hanscom, S. P.
Date: May 25, 1856
On Sunday, May 25, 1856, "at the request of Gov. Robinson," S. P. Hanscom wrote Sara Robinson to assure her that her "esteemed and gallant husband" was well. This remarkably detailed letter describes the governor's captivity, the bogus charges filed against him, and circumstances that brought him to Leavenworth. Hanscom found that Robinson was receiving many visitors, including Congressman William A. Howard, chair of the congressional committee investigating Kansas troubles.

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Bogus laws; Border ruffians; Brown, John, Jr.; Free state cause; Hanscom, S. P.; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Howard, William Alanson; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Martin, John W.; Preston, Colonel; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Stringfellow, John H.; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912; Treason; Westport, Missouri


Letter, Wm Phillips to Respected Madam [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Phillips, William
Date: May 26, 1856
William Phillips, after visiting Charles Robinson in jail, wrote to Sara Robinson updating her on her husband's situation. Phillips reported to her that Charles was being held on two counts: one for high treason and the other for usurping office. He also related to her the events of the sack of Lawrence and the resulting destruction of her home.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Phillips, William; Preston, Colonel; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877


Letter, C. Robinson to My Dear S. [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 29, 1856
Charles Robinson wrote to his wife, Sara Robinson, his first letter during his detention, which would last until Sept 10, 1856. He reported to her that so far he had been treated like a gentleman, and that his quarters were comfortable and would also accommodate her, if she would like to join him. Robinson also expressed regret at the destruction of their home during the sack of Lawrence.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Treason


Photograph, Charles Robinson and Deputy
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 1856
Portrait of Charles Robinson, free state leader, under arrest by a Deputy, in May 1856. Robinson was arrested in Lexington, Missouri, with his wife, Sarah, as they traveled East. He was taken to Westport, the proslavery camp near Lawrence, back to Kansas City, to Leavenworth, and then to Lecompton. Robinson was arrested on charges of treason, and was held prisoner four months before being released on bail.

Keywords: Free state activities; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Handbill advertizement for Concert in Honor of Governor Charles Robinson
Authors: Willey, Prof. G.F.
Date: June 5, 1856
This handbill advertised a concert of the Glee Class and Fitchburg Cornet Band, given "in honor of His Excellency Charles Robinson, Governor of Kansas." Each person in attendance would receive an original piece of music composed by Andrew Whitney, entitled "Gov. Robinson's Polka," in honor of Gov. Robinson.

Keywords: Entertainment; Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Free state government; Massachusetts; Music; National politics; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Whitney, Andrew


Letter, [Amos A. Lawrence] to My Dear Madame [ Sara T. D. Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: June 26, 1856
From New York, Amos Lawrence wrote that he believed "Gov. Robinson cannot be harmed by any action of law" but thought it wise for Sara Robinson to write "a letter to my mother" "to be kept in reserve." (See, doc. #101115, draft letter) Lawrence mentioned visits with Congressmen William Howard and John Sherman (Howard Commission) and testimony before a congressional committee, and seemed optimistic about the situation in Kansas. [Reprinted in Blackmar, Life of Charles Robinson, 434.]

Keywords: Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Howard, William Alanson; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sherman, John, 1823-1900


Letter, Geo. W. Smith, et al to the Friends of Law and Order convened at Topeka
Authors: Brown, Jr., John ; Deitzler, George W.; Jenkins, Gaius ; Robinson, Charles ; Smith, George W.; Williams, Henry H.
Date: July 1, 1856
From a "camp near Lecompton," George W. Smith and the other Free State captives, including Charles Robinson and John Brown, Jr., wrote to state their views on issues facing the Topeka legislature as it convened. First, Smith and company argued that the freestaters had a "right to meet as a Legislature, complete the State organization and pass all laws necessary to the successful administration of Justice," but the assembly should not resist "Federal officer in the service of the legal process" unless they threaten the state organization. Smith, et al, believe success of the cause depended on "a right position and, second upon calm, and unflinching firmness."

Keywords: Blood, James; Brown, John, Jr.; Deitzler, George W.; Federal troops; Free state cause; Free state government; Jenkins, Gaius; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory; United States Government; Williams, Henry H.


George Washington Brown, Near Lecompton, KT to I.B. Donaldson
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: July 9, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. Brown wrote to Israel B. Donaldson, the U.S. Marshal in Kansas, requesting that he terminate and settle a contract with his wife, Mrs. Lois Brown, for boarding the prisoners. Brown asked to board with fellow prisoners John Brown, Jr. and Henry H. Williams and sought to distance himself from Charles Robinson and his followers.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Mrs. George Washington; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Herald of Freedom; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States marshals; Williams, Henry H.


Letter, Sophy [Sophie D. S. Goddard] to Sara [T. D. Robinson]
Authors: Goddard, Sophie D. S.
Date: July 20, [1856]
This letter to Sara Robinson from her sister Sophie Goddard was sent in care of Miss Emily I. Hunt, since rumor had it the letters to the Robinson's and other prisoners were being confiscated. Goddard comments in general terms on a number of Kansas issues and developments, but her letter is one mostly to express concern for the plight of her sister.

Keywords: Brooks, Preston Smith; Free state; Goddard, Sophie D.S.; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Constitution


Letter, C. Robinson, Camp Sacket, to Hon. J. C. Fremont
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: July 28, 1856
While a prisoner at Camp Sackett near Lecompton, Robinson informed Fremont that James Emery was traveling east and should be used in Fremont's presidential campaign as a stump speaker as he "can do good service to the cause." Robinson also indicated that he did not know if the Pierce administration had decided whether or not to hang Robinson and his fellow prisoners.

Keywords: Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Emery, James Stanley; Free state cause; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Prisons; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Eli Thayer to Mr. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Thayer, Eli , 1819-1899
Date: August 5, 1856
From Worcester, Mass., on August 5, 1856, the founder of the Emigrant Aid Company wrote Charles Robinson's "brother" about "certain efforts to injure the reputation of your brother" whom Thayer called "heroic." He mentions the Buffalo convention and the shipment of weapons to KT, but the main objective was to reassure the governor via his "brother" that he had not been forgotten and that Thayer would remain his champion in the East.

Keywords: Free state activities; Free state government; Guns; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Weapons (see also Guns); Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, [J.H. Lane] to His Excellancy C. [Charles] Robinson, et al
Authors: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866
Date: August 10, 1856
In a brief letter from Topeka that is very difficult to decipher, Jim Lane informs Robinson, Gen. George W. Deitzler, George W. Brown, John Brown, "& others" of his arrival with "a sufficient force" to do battle for the free state cause. He seems to counsel quick and decisive action.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Deitzler, George W.; Free state cause; Free state government; Free state militia; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letters, J. H. Lane to "Friends" [Robinson and others] and C. Robinson to "Dear Sir" [J.H. Lane]
Authors: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles
Date: August 11, 1856
Copied by R. J. Hinton from his journal in preparation of one of his publications on the Kansas war, the first letter is Jim Lane's offer to rescue the Lecompton prisoners (Robinson, George W. Brown, Gaius Jenkins, et al) and Charles Robinson's reply, suggesting that in light of current congressional activity the plan was ill-advised. Both were dated August 11, 1856.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Border ruffians; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Congress (See United States. Congress); Deitzler, George W.; Free state militia; Jenkins, Gaius; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.


Charles Robinson to Messrs. Allen, Blood, Hutchinson and others
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: August 16, 1856
Charles Robinson was writing from Camp Sackett, near Lecompton, Kansas Territory, where he was being held prisoner on treason charges. He wrote to encourage free state supporters to negotiate with pro-slavery forces in order to defuse tensions in northeast Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Antislavery; Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Treason


Letter, C. [Charles] Robinson to Capt. [John] Brown
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 13, 1856
Charles Robinson wrote to John Brown from Lawrence on September 13, 1856, a short note encouraging Brown to give Governor Geary, who "talks of letting the past be forgotten," a chance and to come to town to "see us." A note from John Brown, Jr., on the bottom of the page, however, advised caution, as he had "no doubt an attempt will be made to arrest you as well as Lane."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Free state militia; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 20, 1856
From Lawrence Charles Robinson writes to update his wife on developments in and around Lawrence since her departure. Governor John W. Geary had arrived and promised to see that the Missouri militia then threatening Lawrence "were disbanded." Robinson goes on to describe a very tense few days in September, beginning on Friday the 12th, involving militia of both sides and the governor. After a brief skirmish on the prairie east of Lawrence, Geary and some U.S. troops arrived and "the Missourians agreed to go home. It was all a farce. . . ."

Keywords: Buffum, David C.; Franklin, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Free state militia; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Proslavery activities; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stubbs militia company; Titus, Henry Theodore; United States. Army; Westport, Missouri


Receipt and memorandum concerning weapons and ammunition
Authors: Miller, Joseph C.
Date: September 27, 1856
This receipt, which provides a detailed listing of revolvers, knives, cartridges, and other weapons and ammunition, declared that these weapons were "received of Chas. Robinson." The following page is a memorandum by Preston Plumb, who writes that he received the weapons and ammunition listed on the receipt in Iowa City, Iowa "on or about the 4th of September 1856." The weapons were to be delivered to J. M. Winchell in Kansas but were to be used for the "defense of Kanzas." Several hundred weapons were involved.

Keywords: Ammunition; Border disputes and warfare; Guns; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Receipts; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Weapons (see also Guns); Winchell, James M., 1823-1877


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 29, 1856
Again from Lawrence, Charles Robinson wrote to his wife was traveling east via Chicago. After kidding her about how well-known she was becoming, he commented unfavorably on Governor John W. Geary, who "thinks he is awful smart & is getting rediculous fast." Robinson also mentioned the forthcoming legislative election (October 6, 1856)--"We shall not vote."

Keywords: Elections; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara Tappan Doolittle (see Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911)


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Madam [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 3? 1856
Amos A. Lawrence, in Boston, wrote to Sara Robinson regarding her husband's desire to retire from the Emigrant Aid Company, advising her that he not do so until after the November presidential elections. Lawrence also suggested to her that, when writing to President Pierce, she might call him "President" and not "Mister", in order to further her cause. He admitted to Mrs. Robinson, though, that he "has no more love for him" than she does.

Keywords: Davis, Jefferson; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Page from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: October 4, 1856
This front page of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper is half-filled with an illustration of the "Free State Prisoners": George W. Brown, John Brown, Jr., Judge G.W. Smith, Charles Robinson, Gaius Jenkins, Henry Williams, and George Deitzler, at their camp near Lecompton, Kansas Territory. All had been arrested during the past May, either for charges of treason or for bearing arms against the Government.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, Jr.; Deitzler, George W.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Illustrations; Jenkins, Gaius; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Williams, Henry H.


Letter, Thomas H. Webb to Dear Madam [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: October 10, 1856
Thomas Webb, Secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston to Sara Robinson, summarizing the proceedings of the Company's Executive Committee meeting of October 3. Webb told Mrs. Robinson that they had received and honored Dr. Charles Robinson's request to resign from the Committee. He added that the members of the Executive Committee still wished to maintain communication with Dr. Robinson "regarding all matters that concern the cause of Kansas", and that Robinson would continue to be paid for the following six months.

Keywords: New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My dear Mrs. [Sara] Robinson
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 30, 1856
Amos A. Lawrence, writing from Boston, congratulated Sara Robinson, in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, on her first book. Lawrence suggested that she write another Kansas work, as she had all the elements for a "free state" novel. He also requested that she have her husband, Dr. Charles Robinson, come to Boston the following Monday to discuss the Delaware Land Purchase and meet Charles Sumner, the famed Republican abolitionist senator from Massachusetts.

Keywords: Books; Boston, Massachusetts; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874


Agreement for the establishment of the Quindaro Town Company
Authors: Guthrie, Abelard ; Robinson, Charles ; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Walker, Joel
Date: November 1, 1856
The document outlined the details related to the establishment of the Quindaro Town Company. It called for the distribution of lots (shares) among the four founders and outlined plans for selling the remaining lots. It also proposed how proceeds from the sale of lots would be used for various improvements and the number of lots designated for civic purposes.

Keywords: Economic development; Guthrie, Abelard; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town companies; Town development; Town shares; Town site speculation; Walker, Joel; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Plan of Action, Charles Robinson
Authors: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Date: November 5, 1856
This document lays out the plan of action proposed by Charles Robinson at a meeting of free state leaders in Boston on November 5, 1856. Most likely these notes from the meeting were written by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a radical abolitionist from Massachusetts. Six resolutions were passed, some focusing on emigration and others on land sales or fundraising. The back of the document lists the names of those present at the meeting, including such influential figures as Senator Henry Wilson and Eli Thayer.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Cabot, Samuel; Emery, James Stanley; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Free state legislature; Immigration and early settlement; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Smith, Gerritt; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Account Book, 1856-57
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 1856 - April 1857
This cloth bound journal, identified as "Dr. Chas Robinson Account Book, 1856-1866," contains territorial entries for 1856 and 1857 only--entries such as, "S. W. Simpson To Joel Walker For Draft (for the purchase of land)" for $500 and "Notes Receivable // To Sales of Stock // For Thaddeus Hyatt's Note . . . The understanding is that Hyatt shall not receive his certificate for shares until he has put on the Kaw River a Steamboat of 40 tons buthen, worth $5000., and suitable to navigating the Kaw River."

Keywords: Account books; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Financial statements; Grover, Joel; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Steamboats; Walker, Joel; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. Robinson to Dear Sir [John Calhoun, Esq.]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 3, 1856
Charles Robinson wrote to John Calhoun, the Surveyor General in Lecompton, about the paperwork that he himself had filed the last year regarding a "float" ownership in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Robinson had found that the ownership notice was not on file with the government, and was sending Calhoun proof of ownership in an attempt to correct the problem. John Calhoun was an avid pro-slavery supporter, having once said that he was "too lazy to work" and "wanted the negroes to do it for him".

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Land claim disputes; Land surveys; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Tennery, William M.; Wyandot Float


Letter, S .[Salmon] P. Chase, of endorsement for "Captain John Brown"
Authors: Chase, Salmon Portland
Date: December 20, 1856
The Free Soil/Republican governor of Ohio, Salmon P. Chase, Columbus, Ohio, wrote this letter of introduction/endorsement for "Captain John Brown" who was "a gentleman in every way worthy of entire confidence."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Columbus, Ohio; Free Soil Party; Free state cause; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to S. N. Simpson
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 6, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to Samuel Simpson in Kansas Territory, complaining to him that he had not received the map and information on the newly purchased Wyandotte lands Simpson was to send him. Hill expressed a desire to purchase two or three town shares if they were not too expensive, bringing the value of his investments in Kansas to almost half of his total worth. His aim, as he expressed it, was "first to make money, secondly help the Caus [sic] of freedom". Hill also communicated his dislike for President Pierce's recent statements, and that the free state supporters lobbying in Washington were having "pretty warm work."

Keywords: Armstrong, Silas; Hill, Hiram; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town companies


Letter, draft of, written by Amos Lawrence for Sara Robinson
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: 1856
According to Frank W. Blackmar, who reprinted this document in the appendix of his book, The Life of Charles Robinson (1901), it was "a draft of a letter sent by Amos A. Lawrence to be re-written and signed by Mrs. Robinson and addressed to Mrs. Lawrence, [a "relative" of President Pierce and] the mother of Amos A. Lawrence. The letter," which concerns Charles Robinson's imprisonment (May 10-Sept. 10, 1856 ) in K.T., was sent by Mrs. Lawrence to Mrs. Pierce, wife of the President who gave it to the President to read."]

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Bogus legislature; Election fraud; Free state cause; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Treason


Pamphlet, "Affairs in Kansas"
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This pamphlet contains a proclamation made by President Franklin Pierce and a speech by Senator Isaac Toucey. Also included are printed copies of letters and papers which date from December 1, 1855 to February 18, 1856, and communicate between Governor Wilson Shannon and other officials in Kansas Territory and the President and officials of the federal government which relate to "difficulties" in Kansas Territory. In this document, free state efforts are described as those of a "secret military organization" working against the legitimate Territorial Government.

Keywords: Buckley, H.H.; Calhoun, John; Clarke, George W.; Davis, Jefferson; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Free state militia; Hargis, S.N.; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marcy, William L.; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Richardson, William P.; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Shawnee Mission; Skirmishing; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Toucey, Isaac; Weapons (see also Guns); Westport, Missouri


Narrative, the Murder of Charles Dow, by Isaac Goodnow
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: 1856
This written account reports on the incidents surrounding the murder of Charles Dow, including various skirmishes and military action which followed, leading up to the Wakarusa War. Dow was a free state supporter and was murdered by Franklin Coleman, who, according to Goodnow, had turned proslavery only after coming to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Branson rescue (1855); Branson, Jacob; Coleman, Franklin M.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Dow, Charles W.; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles; Skirmishing; Violence; Violent deaths


Brief for Applicant in the matter of the "Wyandott Robitaille Float."
Authors: Weer, William
Date: Circa 1856
William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Indian floats; Indian lands; Jenkins, Gaius; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Livingston, S. J.; Lykins, William H. R.; Mathews, George G.; Native Americans; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robitaille, Robert; Savage, William; United States. General Land Office; Weer, William; Wyandot Float; Wyandot Indians


Letter, Ephm. Nute to Dear Fr. [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: January 5, 1857
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

Keywords: Education; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Religion; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; School buildings; Teachers; Town development; Universities and colleges


Report of the Treasurer, Kansas State Central Committee
Authors: Kansas State Central Committee
Date: January 6, 1857
Dated Topeka, January 6, 1857, this document claimed to be a "report of Money & goods received and Paid out, by Treasurer." Its initial entry was for July 24, 1856, and the last October 29, 1856, and it includes the names of Charles Robinson, W. F. M. Arny, and S. W. Eldridge.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Horses; Kansas Central Committee; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Richard McAllister to Mrs. Charles Robinson
Authors: McAllister, Richard
Date: January 9, 1857
Richard McAllister, Deputy Secretary to Governor Geary, wrote to Sara Robinson from Lecompton, enclosing an invitation to the Citizens' Ball on January 15th. McAllister had traveled to Washington with Governor Geary, and was with him when Geary's assassination was attempted. Geary's aim as governor was to put an end to political violence in Kansas by eliminating guerrilla warfare on the part of both free state and proslavery supporters.

Keywords: Balls (parties); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; McAllister, Richard; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, James Redpath to Sir
Authors: Redpath, James , 1833-1891
Date: February 1857
This printed form letter was written by James Redpath to the people of Boston asking for money for the people of Manhattan, Kansas in order to build a church, school, and library. Redpath had been appointed their agent to solicit this money. He included a list of references at the foot of the page.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Cabot, Samuel; Churches; Community life; Dana, Charles A.; Education; Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


Quit-Claim Deed and Bond for Henry Campbell and H.M. Simpson to C. Robinson
Authors: Campbell, Henry ; Simpson, H.M
Date: 13 February 1857
Quit-Claim Deed for Henry Campbell and H.M. Simpson, passing ownership of part of a lot on Massachusetts street on to Charles Robinson.

Keywords: Campbell, Henry; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Legal documents; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, H.M


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson and S.C. Pomeroy
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: February 14, 1857
A. A. Lawrence, writing from Boston, sent a letter along with notes and stock valued at $12,696.14 to Charles Robinson and S.C. Pomeroy, who were acting as Trustees of Lawrence University. He instructed that the money be held in trust, with the intrest income to be used "for the advancement of religious and intellectual education of the young in Kansas." However, Lawrence added that he wanted the funds returned to him if Kansas should not become a free state after its acceptance into the Union.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Education; Lawrence University; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Universities and colleges


Letter, C. [Charles] Robinson to Rev. E. E. [Edward Everett] Hale
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: April 7, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Emigrant aid companies; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Letter, A. A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: April 29, 1857
A. A. Lawrence wrote from Boston to Charles Robinson regarding various complaints and general "dissatisfaction" that he had heard of Robinson. Lawrence advised Robinson to avoid disagreement and controversy with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, as the company had great financial and moral power. However, he agreed with Robinson and Pomeroy's decisions regarding the promotion of education in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Lawrence also referred an upcoming election, where free state men would be forced to vote to avoid a split ticket.

Keywords: Education; Elections; Lawrence University; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sampson, Rev. W.H.; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, James [H. Holmes] to Dear friend [John] Brown
Authors: Holmes, James H.
Date: April 30, 1857
On April 30 after he had received correspondence from Brown (still in Springfield, Mass.), Holmes wrote again in reply and to further explain the state of affairs in Kansas. He is critical of Charles Robinson's willingness to compromise with the proslavery leaders and is confident that "the free-state men wont do it." A friend, Archibal Kandell, had been recently "kidnapped" (or "abducted into Missouri") from his claim near Osawatomie.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state activities; Holmes, James H.; Missouri; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Proslavery activities; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, [Ely Moore and William Brindle] Lecompton Land Office to Charles Robinson, Esq.
Authors: Brindle, William ; Moore, Ely
Date: May 9, 1857
Ely Moore, Register, and William Brindle, Receiver of the Lecompton Land Office wrote to Charles Robinson regarding his ownership of a claim. Robert Robetaille, a Wyandotte Indian, had come forward to place his name on the same piece of land. Robinson was required to produce counter proof of ownership of the claim at the Lecompton Land Office. A. A. Lawrence, in a letter to Robinson dated April 29, 1857, referred to Robinson's attempt to obtain ownership papers of this "float" claim.

Keywords: Brindle, William; Land claim disputes; Lecompton Land Office; Moore, Ely; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robitaille, Robert; Wyandot Indians


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: May 16, 1857
A. A. Lawrence wrote to Charles Robinson in Kansas Territory from Green Bay, Wisconsin. Lawrence commented on the recently appointed Governor of Kansas Territory, Robert John Walker, and criticized his desire to split the free state party. He referred to disagreements within the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and mentioned that he had resigned his position as Treasurer. Lawrence also discussed the collapse of land speculation all over the West.

Keywords: Kansas Territory. Governor; Land sales; Land speculation; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Page from Harper's Weekly, "Famous Places in Kansas"
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: June 6, 1857
This page, taken from an issue of Harper's Weekly, features engraving illustrations of the Governor's Mansion in Lecompton, Kansas Territory, and James Lane's fort on Mount Oread, near Lawrence, Kansas Territory. A caption explains the history of each structure and the personalities who frequent them.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Mount Oread; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Message of Charles Robinson, Governor of Kanzas, Delivered at Topeka, June 11, 1857
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: June 11, 1857
Charles Robinson addressed his remarks to the Senate and House of Representatives that met as the extra legal free state legislature during 1856 and 1857. He reviewed the violence that had occurred since the legislature first convened in March, 1856. He also indicated that since their terms would soon expire, the legislature needed to pass an election law and make provisions for a census, otherwise the free state government would no longer exist if it had not formal procedures for continuing. The address included several statements about how the officially recognized government was usurping its powers.

Keywords: Free state legislature; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, James Wooten to Geo. W. Collamoor Esq.
Authors: Wooten, James
Date: June 15, 1857
James Wooten wrote from Boston to George Collamore in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, regarding the recent and unexpected death of his brother, Robert. Wooten said that Charles Robinson, who had been appointed Executor of Robert's estate, had written him. Wooten had provided a list of his brother's properties to Robinson, which included land in Quindaro.

Keywords: Collamore, George W.; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Wooten, James


Letter, Charles Mayo to G.W. Collamore
Authors: Mayo, Charles
Date: June 17, 1857
Charles Mayo wrote from Olathe, Kansas Territory, to George Collamore, seeking his advice. Mayo told Collamore that the proslavery citizens of Olathe were urging him to accept the appointment of Magistrate in the county, though Mayo worried how that might affect his standing with the free state party.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Collamore, George W.; Free state perspective; Johnson County, Kansas Territory; Lawyers; Mayo, Charles; Olathe, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Augustus Wattles to Jas. Smith Esq.
Authors: Wattles, Augustus
Date: June 18, 1857
From Lawrence on June 18, 1857, Augustus Wattles wrote Jas. Smith (Is this a Brown alias?) regarding affairs in Kansas Territory, specifically referring to several of the Free State Party's leaders: "Holmes' is at Emporia plowing. Conway's here talking politics. Phillips is here trying to urge the free State men to galvanize the Topeka Constitution into life. . . ." and Robinson had "dispirited the Free State party" by his absence from the legislature last winter, making it "difficult to make them rally again under him." Although one hears "much against Brown" he is "as good as ever."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state legislature; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Herald of Freedom; Holmes, James H.; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, James; Topeka Constitution; Wattles, Augustus


Quit-Claim Deed for Charles and Sarah Robinson
Authors: Bassett, Owen A.
Date: June 24, 1857
By this Quit-Claim Deed, Charles and Sarah Robinson relinquished ownership of a section of their property in Leavenworth County to Edward Babb of Cincinnati, Ohio.

Keywords: Babb, Edward; Bassett, O. A. (Owen Abbot); Land titles; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Real estate transactions; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Smith, Samuel C.


Letter, Albert C. Morton to Mr. [Hiram] Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: July 8, 1857
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton reported on the status of Samuel N. Simpson, who had left his properties to Charles Robinson, free state leader and fellow founder of the Quindaro Town Company, and left town under suspicion of engaging in deceptive business practices. Another fellow founder of the Town Company, Abelard Guthrie, along with other investors, considered Simpson a "rascil [sic]". Morton also mentioned the progress of the railroad in the area, and the yet to be received package of money.

Keywords: Guthrie, Abelard; Hill, Hiram; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroads; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: July 20 [1857]
Josiah Miller wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his Father and Mother, recently settled in Illinois. He discussed with them family news, and attached a postscript regarding their land warrants in Kansas Territory. Miller also referred to the free state supporters' rejection of a charter put in place by the "bogus legislature" in Lecompton, and the subsequent meeting of the free state legislature in Topeka. A census had been taken by free state men in the largest pro-slavery localities. According to Miller, this census found that free state men outnumbered proslavery supporters by at least 1 to 7.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Census; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state legislature; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Land claims; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lum, S. Y; Miller, Josiah; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Thos. J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: July 24, 1857
Agent Thomas Marsh, Mass. State Kansas Committee, wrote another of his frequent and detailed letters to George Stearns on July 24, 1857, describing the census and other preparations that were being made for the upcoming election (most importantly, the legislative election in October of that year). Of special interest were the activities of Jim Lane by the Free State Convention to organize militarily for "the protection of the Ballot Boxes."

Keywords: African Americans; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state cause; Free state militia; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Marsh, Thomas J.; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Speculation; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, J. A. Andrew to Dear [George] Collamore
Authors: Andrew, J. A.
Date: July 7, 1857
J. A. Andrew wrote to George Collamore with advice to the people of Lawrence regarding the bogus legislature. Andrew suggested that the free state men continue to vote down any constitution that is not the one drawn in Topeka. He also described his impressions of the free state leaders, such as Charles Robinson, James Lane, and others.

Keywords: Andrew, J.A.; Bogus legislature; Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Conway, Martin Franklin; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Charles; Taxation; Topeka Constitution


Letter, Thos. J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 5, 1857
Again from Lawrence, Marsh wrote Stearns on August 5 to ask for clarification about an order he had received from Amos Lawrence to pay John Brown $335. Brown was not in Kansas at that time and could "not be of much service if he is away from the Territory."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cheyenne Indians; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; United States. Army; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Chas Chadwick to Hiram Hill Esq.
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: August 8, 1857
Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Chadwick told Hill that he had met with Charles Robinson the evening before and had discussed the matter of Samuel Simpson and his lands. Robinson seemed to think that Simpson would return to set things right with the Town Company. Chadwick expressed skepticism that this would happen, but believed Simpson could be contacted by sending letters to Boston.

Keywords: Chadwick, Charles; Fraud; Hill, Hiram; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, A. A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: August 14, 1857
A. A. Lawrence, from Boston, wrote to Charles Robinson, giving his impressions of recent political and business events. Lawrence gave his support for the upcoming Missouri election, which he believed would break up the pro-slavery party. He praised Robinson's handling of Lawrence's trust funds and properties, stating "Old Brown ought to report to you. It is bad policy to have a ranger like him with money and arms at his disposal, and only accountable to people here."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Finance; Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T. [Thomas] J. Marsh to George L. Stearns, Esq.
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 20, 1857
In his August 20, 1857, report to Stearns, Marsh again asked for some clarification on a couple payment issues and described his role for the committee (Mass. State Kansas Committee) with regard to Jim Lane's efforts to organize protection for free state voters. For a short while, things looked good for the Free State cause, but Governor Walker's conduct to date had been disruptive and Judge Cato and friends began to issue arrest warrants.

Keywords: Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Militia; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, A. [Augustus] Wattles to Dear Sir [John Brown?]
Authors: Wattles, Augustus
Date: August 21, 1857
Augustus Wattles wrote to John Brown from Lawrence, August 21, 1857, regarding several matters but focused again on problems within the Free State movement because of a loss of confidence in Charles Robinson's leadership. Robinson had openly criticized G. W. Brown and the Herald of Freedom and the factious party could accomplish little, but Wattles was confident that free staters would vote in and win the October election for territorial legislature.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Herald of Freedom; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence Republican; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Army; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 27, 1857
In this letter from Lawrence, K.T., Marsh reported that despite opposition from Judge Martin Conway, the delegates at the Grasshopper Falls Convention on August 26 "voted to go into the [October] Election with all the power they have." So, the stage was set for the campaign that needed all the financial support Stearns's committee could give it through Marsh.

Keywords: Congressional delegate; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Convention; Grasshopper Falls, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, [Thomas J.] Marsh to Dear Sir [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 29, 1857
From Lawrence, K.T., Thomas J. Marsh wrote to George Stearns on August 29, 1857, to describe the political situation in the territory and the results of the Grasshopper Falls Convention which had taken place three days before. Those favoring participation in the October legislative election carried the day (see Annals of Kansas, 176) and subsequently "a Grand Ratification meeting" endorse the conventions action, including the nomination of Marcus J. Parrott for delegate to Congress.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Hutchinson, George W.; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Music; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Schuyler, Philip Church; Smith, George W.; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Chas. Chadwick to Hiram Hill Esq.
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: August 30, 1857
Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, concerning several 40 acre lots which were marked off shortly before Samuel N. Simpson left town. It appeared to Chadwick that those Simpson had purchased were purchased on the behalf of absentee investors, such as Hill, even though they had not been divided or designated in the name of any others. Chadwick presumed that Abelard Guthrie would allow Hill to have the land he thought was being purchased in his name upon payment to the Town Company. Chadwick also reported that prices of land were staying up in Quindaro, and that business development continued.

Keywords: Chadwick, Charles; Hill, Hiram; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town development; Town lots; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 7, 1857
This very personal letter by Charles Robinson in Lawrence was written to his wife Sara Robinson, who was visiting family and friends back East. It briefly mentions the Quindaro land company business that was occupying some of Robinson's time and the fact that "political matters are comparatively quiet." Mainly, the "governor" just missed his wife and urged her to write soon and often.

Keywords: Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Wyandot Float


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 13, 1857
This very personal letter from Charles Robinson in Lawrence to his wife Sara visiting back east touches on a number of things such as "keeping house on the hill," business and financial interests, and being "tired" of the turmoil in Kansas Territory, but mostly it expresses the husband's longing for the wife to return.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Domestics; Houses; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Panic of 1857; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, Chas. Chadwick to Hiram Hill
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: September 19, 1857
Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Chadwick told him of Samuel Simpson's return, and the business dealings that resulted from it. It appeared that all investors would get their land as promised. He expressed excitement about the construction of a new bridge, which would "secure [Quindaro's] Supremacy over Wyandotte and Kansas City" for easing trade in the area. Chadwick also mentioned an upcoming election, and asked Hill if he expected many from Massachusetts to emigrate to K.T. this season.

Keywords: Bridges; Chadwick, Charles; Emigration and immigration; Gray, Alfred; Guthrie, Abelard; Hill, Hiram; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 26, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote this letter to his wife upon his return to Lawrence from "a tour of ten days into the southern part of the Territory." This was a political trip, and the previous night he had been involved in another political meeting, but nevertheless, Robinson wished he "was fairly clear of political affairs, but do not see how I can get out of them at present." He also mentioned the forthcoming legislative election (October 1857) which he believed would be okay "unless there are great frauds."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: October 1, 1857
Another personal letter from a tired and somewhat discouraged Charles Robinson in Lawrence to his wife Sara, who is apparently about ready to rejoin her husband in Lawrence, as he discusses meeting her in St. Louis. Robinson made reference to business affairs, including those in Quindaro, and curiously suggests that he was "about ready to go with Mr. Grover to South America" because he was "getting sick of this turmoil & strife."

Keywords: Domestics; Physicians; Quindaro Town Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; St. Louis, Missouri


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: October 3, 1857
From Lawrence, Charles Robinson wrote to Sara to finalize arrangements for meeting her in St. Louis later in the month, but he also mentioned a "Daniel Foster and Mr. Nute." The former was "mad with me & [Jim] Lane because he couldn't carry his policy in the Grasshopper Falls Convention."

Keywords: Business enterprises; Foster, Daniel; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Nute, Ephraim; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; St. Louis, Missouri


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 19, 1857
Amos Lawrence wrote to Charles Robinson from Boston, praising him as a leader, "a lover of liberty and a lover of his country." Lawrence also communicated his happiness as a result of the recent election of the Territorial Legislature on October 6, 1857. However, he described the economic conditions of the country as being in a state of "financial derangement," and he hoped that Robinson would not be adversely affected by the staggering interest rates.

Keywords: Economic conditions; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Foster, Daniel; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, [U. S. Senator] H. Wilson to "Dear [Charles] Robinson"
Authors: Wilson, Henry , 1812-1875
Date: November 26, 1857
U.S. Senator Henry Wilson (1812-1875), a Republican from Massachusetts who was to become vice president of the United States in 1873, wrote Robinson from his home in Natick, Mass., regarding the Lecompton controversy. Robinson apparently had written for "advise" and Wilson simply wrote "you must look well to the position of matters and act as seems to you best." He did not believe it could pass the Congress "but if it is adopted do not fail to elect your state officers under it. Get the power if you can. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. Senate; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Letter, Gaius Jenkins to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Jenkins, Gaius
Date: November 29, 1857
From Washington, D.C., Gaius Jenkins, the man who would be shot and killed by Jim Lane on June 3, 1858, wrote Robinson regarding an business/investment issue (apparently a Wyandotte Float, perhaps involving the Quindaro land investment) of theirs before Congress, but devoted most of his letter to "the Kansas question" and "that bogus [Lecompton] constitution. Former K.T. Governor Robert J. Walker, who Jenkins "called on" in D.C., branded it "the most damnable absurdity and rong [sic] that he had ever known committed in a Republican government. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro Town Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.; Wyandot Float


Letter, T. [Thomas] J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: December 18, 1857
Upon his return to the East (Boston), Marsh wrote to Stearns on December 18, 1857, to provide a relatively brief outline of his experience and accomplishments since leaving for Kansas Territory on committee business the previous June. He said others could be the judge of the success of the "mission," but "a Free State Legislature was secured by the election" and Governor Charles Robinson had been "quite complimentary" of Marsh in a letter to Amos A. Lawrence.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Cato, Sterling G.; Census; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state legislature; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Steamboats; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Territorial politics and government; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Walter Oakley, et al, to Charles Robinson
Authors: Oakley, Walter ; Ritchie, John , 1817-1887; Ross, William Wallace
Date: December 26, 1857
Walter Oakley, W. W. Ross, and John Richey wrote from Topeka to invited Robinson to attend and address the "Mass Meeting" to be held in their city on Monday, December 28, for the purpose of endorsing "the action of the Convention at Lawrence. These men and the community held Robinson in the highest "esteem" but they differed with him "upon the question of voting for state officers under the Lecompton Constitution."

Keywords: Free State Convention; Free State Party; Free state supporters; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Oakley, Walter; Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Ross, William Wallace, 1828-1889; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. K. Holliday, et al, to Charles Robinson
Authors: Crane, Franklin L.; Dickey, Milton C.; Farnsworth, Loring ; Giles, Frye W.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 26, 1857
In this brief letter from Topeka, signed by C. K. Holiday, M. C. Dickey, F. L. Crane, Loring Farnsworth, and F. W. Giles, "Governor" Robinson was "respecfully and cordially" invited to participate in a "mass convention" at Topeka (December 28, 1857) convened "to deliberate upon the political questions of the day; and more especially upon the action of the late 'Lawrence Convention.'"

Keywords: Crane, Franklin Loomis; Dickey, Milton C.; Farnsworth, Loring; Free State Party; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Giles, Frye W.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka, Kansas


Circular, To the Friends of Freedom
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: ca. 1857
"To The Friends of Freedom" is a published circular signed by John Brown, with testimonial statements by Charles Robinson and Gerrit Smith. Brown here appealed for "contributions of pecuniary aid" to help sustain the free-state cause in Kansas.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Free state support; Osawatomie, Battle of; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Gerritt


Statement draft, Charles Robinson to the Register and Receiver for the Territory of Kansas
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: ca. 1857
In this unsigned draft, Charles Robinson presented the facts surrounding the circumstances of his ownership of a Quarter section of land, which had been contested by William H.R. Lykins, who had placed part of the Wyandotte reservation on the same section of land. Robinson stated that, at the time he came under ownership of the land, he filed the proper papers with the Surveyor General, and that at no time had he quit claim on this particular piece of land.

Keywords: Indian reserves; Land claim disputes; Lykins, William H. R.; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Surveyor General; Wyandot Float


Letter, Chas. Robinson (on behalf of the citizens of Lawrence) to Hon. F. P. Stanton
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: 1857
This letter by Charles Robinson, free state leader and future Governor of the state of Kansas, appears here in published form. Robinson wrote to F. P. Stanton, the acting governor of Kansas Territory, expressing his opinion that the people of the Territory were not getting their fair say in electing officers or administrating territorial laws. He referred to the upcoming Lecompton Constitutional Convention, which would take place in September 1857, and outlined some procedural guidelines by which the Convention should be run if the free state men were to participate.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894


Invitation to a ball at the Free State Hotel
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1858
An invitation to a ball held on January 29, 1859, at the Free State hotel with proceeds going toward refurnishing the hotel.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Allen, Lyman; Babcock, Carmi William; Blood, James; Branscomb, Charles H.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Deitzler, George W.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Eldridge House; Emery, James Stanley; Entertainment; Free State Hotel; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Jenkins, Gaius; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; McClure, W. M.; Mead, Andrew J.; Moore, H. Miles (Henry Miles), b. 1826; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Searl, Albert D.; Smith, George W.; Winchell, J. M.


Account Book, 1858-59
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 1858 - June 1859
This cloth bound journal, identified as "Account Book of Gov. Charles Robinson, January 1, 1858--June 15, 1872," began with an "Inventory of Property belonging to C. Robinson," land and shares, as well as a list of people to whom he owed money. The inventory referred to Lawrence property, a "Wyandotte Float," and shares in the towns of Topeka, Quindaro, etc.

Keywords: Account books; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Financial statements; Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Nichols, Clarina Irene Howard, 1810-1885; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Town companies; Wyandot Float; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, S.C.S. [most likely Samuel C. Smith] to "Doctor" [Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: January 11, 1858
This letter, dated Lawrence, January 11, 1858, most likely from Samuel C. Smith, mentions many of the Free State Party's main actors and issues at this critical time in Kansas politics. He described the activities of the Legislature, which assembled in Lawrence in January, and devotes considerable attention to the machinations of the "villain" Jim Lane.

Keywords: Allen, Lyman; Babcock, Carmi William; Conway, Martin Franklin; Deitzler, George W.; Free State Party; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Larzalere, Alfred; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Railroad companies; Railroad legislation; Railroad promotion; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Temperance movement; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Vaughan, Champion


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My dear friend [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: January 16, 1858
E. B. Whitman wrote Sanborn this lengthy letter from Lawrence, describing the political events that had unfolded in the territory since the October 5, 1857, election. Among many other things, he mentioned the split that took the "National democrats" out of the movement over the issue of participation in the state elections under the Lecompton Constitution, January 1857. This "Free State ticket" was, according to Whitman, "a disgrace to the cause," but it attracted a good number of votes and won "a good working majority in both houses and so our people proclaim a victory." Whitman, who had long been a faithful supporter, was seemingly losing confidence in John Brown, as were "the people."

Keywords: Bogus laws; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Calhoun, John; Conway, Martin Franklin; Democratic Party (U.S.); Education; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Elections; Free State Party; Free state legislature; Herald of Freedom; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Congress; United States. Senate; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: February 3, 1858
Amos Lawrence wrote to Charles Robinson from Boston, communicating his dismay at the allegedly fraudulent election procedures taken in order to get the Lecompton Constitution adopted. Lawrence advised that an end to the "agitators' " operations be achieved at once, before the pro-slavery Senators could be put under the protection of the Federal Government.

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My Dear Friend [F. B. Sanborn ?]
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: February 18, 1858
As a follow up to his more lengthy report of January 16, Whitman wrote from Lawrence on February 18, 1858, about the turbulent course of Kansas politics during the last month. Again, he attacked Robinson's efforts to compromise with the forces behind the "Lecompton Swindle," and described the other factions plan of action should Congress adopt the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Constitutional conventions; Election, Leavenworth Constitution delegates to convention, March 1858; Free State Party; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature); Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, E. B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: February 20, 1858
This rather lengthy report from Lawrence addressed many issues, especially those surrounding the Lecompton constitutional controversy. With "the Topeka Movement . . . abandoned," the question was what would take its place to resist the Lecompton Constitution if it were accepted by the Congress. The territorial legislature had formally "protested against the admission of Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution," and "the Mass of the people are determined" to resist its imposition. Whitman went on to make many other interesting observations about the political situation, regarding Democrats and Republicans and even abolitionists: "men who seek here and now, on this issue, to break the back bone of slavery forever." In addition to the political, Whitman described his "labor of distributing the clothing . . . for the relief of Kansas," and discussed in some detail the financial situation regarding the Committee, his personal debt, and Kansas relief and support to John Brown.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Buchanan administration; Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state support; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, John Brown, Jr. to My Dear General [E. B.] Whitman
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: February 26, 1858
To his Kansas friend "General Whitman," John Brown Jr. wrote from his farm in Ashtabula, Ohio, regarding his continued commitment to the cause of Kansas and the state of his health. Brown wanted Whitman to know the reason for his sudden departure in October 1856: "the symptoms of mental abberation were again manifest to myself at least, and I knew that I must change scenes & circumstances, or again loose my balance entirely." But despite the hardships endured and the resulting illness, "Kansas is deguerotyped upon my heart, a stormy yet glorious picture."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Illness; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Topeka; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slavery; Whitman, E. B.


Account Book, 1858-1872
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 1858
Charles Robinson's March 1858 "Account Book" entries included land deals involving James Blood and another with Alfred Gray of Quindaro.

Keywords: Account books; Blood, James; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Gray, Alfred; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 3, 1858
Amos Lawrence wrote from Boston to Charles Robinson in Kansas Territory, regarding questionable ratification of the Lecompton Constitution. Lawrence advised that the best course of action to take was to "rid the territory of all traitors to the popular right", though such action should take place only if it could "avoid open hostilities altogether."

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 5, 1858
From Boston, Mass., on March 5, 1858, Lawrence wrote Robinson what amounted to a letter of introduction for a W. D. Goddard, "an ardent free state man" who wished "to live and die in Kansas."

Keywords: Free state cause; Free state settlers; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Chas. Chadwick to Hiram Hill
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: March 25, 1858
Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding various aspects of town development. Chadwick told Hill of some controversy over his ownership of some lands, both "outside" and in town, which were also being claimed by Wyandotte Indians. He described the potential for new businesses to open in Quindaro, including a machine shop and foundry. Chadwick waited for the arrival of new immigrants and hoped the "eastern capitalists" would introduce more money into their economy. He added his comments about the fraudulent ratification of the Lecompton Constitution, suggesting that the Constitution would do the most good "with the. . .box under the woodpile".

Keywords: Business enterprises; Chadwick, Charles; Guthrie, Abelard; Hill, Hiram; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroads; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robitaille, Robert; Town development; Walker, Joel; Wyandot Indians


Letter, E. B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 13, 1858
Whitman wrote a rather lengthy update on the Kansas situation for Stearns, focusing on the political machinations of the previous few and the uncertain situation created by the Lecompton debate. Of territorial leadership, Whitman observed: "While Kansas is blessed with many of the truest men of the age, men who are fully up to the emergency, she is also cursed with some of the most unprincipled demagogues that ever afflicted any country." There was much confusion and disagreement about the best course of action for free state men to take, now that many acknowledge the death of the Topeka movement. He then turned to the work of the Minneola/Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March 1858.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, R. S. Stevens to My Dear Sir [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 25, 1858
Robert S. Stevens, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported that Congress had passed the English Bill, which essentially resubmitted the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Stevens predicted that Kansans would vote against it and that Kansas' admission as a state would be delayed until at least 1860. Stevens commented that legislators in Washington failed to understand "the real situation in Kansas," particularly the strength of the antislavery group in the territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; English Bill; Lecompton Constitution; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Congress


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Geo. L. Stearns Esq.
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 30, 1858
Whitman's April 30, 1858, letter to Stearns described the harmonious work conducted by the "State Convention" and its nomination of state officers under the Leavenworth Constitution. That movement, he told Stearns, would probably not "amount to much if the Lecompton Constitution is rejected. He also mentioned continued tension in Bourbon County and the route of U.S. troops by "the free State boys" of Fort Scott.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Convention; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Army; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, [C. Robinson] to "My Dear Sir" [Henry Wilson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 12, 1858
This important document is reportedly a copy of a letter from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, May 12, 1858, to Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson in which the Kansas governor expresses confidence that the Lecompton Constitution will be overwhelmingly defeated in the upcoming election and makes numerous observations about the state of politics--present and future--in Kansas. Robinson believed that half the Democrats would oppose the Lecompton instrument because they knew that freestaters would dominate any state government that would be admitted under it and subsequently "the Constitution would be changed in the 'twinkling of an eye.'" Thus, he predicted no Kansas admission until at least December 1859, and in the meantime expected Democrats to "take the lead in aiding in developing the resources of Kansas, & [the Democratic Party] will claim to be the special friends of our infant State."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Election, Lecompton Constitution, August 1857; English Bill; Factionalism; Free State Party; Free state supporters; Journals; Lecompton Constitution; Partisan press; Press and politics; Press and propaganda; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Letter, Chas. Chadwick to Hiram Hill Esq
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: June 1, 1858
Charles Chawick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, to tell him that it appeared favorable that Hill would win possession of the land disputed by Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. However, Chadwick feared that the decision may not be made as easily as he had earlier anticipated, since Robert Lawrence had been seen in Leavenworth and had not traveled to Washington to work with Nathaniel Causin. Nonetheless, Abelard Guthrie had given up trying to obtain the land as well, leaving Hiram as the only other claimant.

Keywords: Causin, Nathanial Pope; Guthrie, Abelard; Hill, Hiram; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Robert J.; Lawyers; Long, Irving; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robitaille, Robert; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Marc Parrott to O. E. Learnard
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: June 12, 1858
Marcus Parrott, Representative of Kansas Territory to the U. S. Congress, wrote to Oscar Learnard from Washington, D. C. reacting to the news of Gaius Jenkins' death at the hand of fellow free state man, James Lane. He referred to several friends and colleagues with whom he was eager to reunite upon his return to Lawrence soon after the 25th of the month.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Free state activities; Jenkins, Gaius; Land claim disputes; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, M. F. Conway to My dear Sir [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Conway, Martin Franklin
Date: June 13, 1858
Somewhat disturbed that Stearns of Boston had published his (Conway's) letter regarding "money for the Leavenworth Constitution," Martin F. Conway, Lawrence, wrote to say that there was nothing "improper or dishonorable in this transaction" and went on to reflect on the nature of the Free State Party/movement at that time. Charles Robinson was "at work to destroy the influence of the Republican wing of the Free State Party," but people back East should not conclude "that the bottom is going to fall out of Kansas because there is division in the Free State Party." Conway expected both Robinson and James H. Lane to fall from prominence because of changing circumstances in Kansas.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Free State Party; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Account Book, 1858-1872
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: August - September 1858
Robinson's August and September 1858 "Account Book" entries included several for the "Quindaro Company," which was being actively promoted and developed at this time. Specific items included reference to the purchase of "2 yoke cattle" for $150, "expenses of C.R. at Washington," and an itemized list of supplies and services for the infant river town.

Keywords: Account books; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Education; Financial statements; Gray, Alfred; Kansas Land Trust Company; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Schools; Stevens, Robert S.; Town companies; Washington, D.C.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Agreement concerning the Missouri River and Rocky Mountain Rail Road and the Delaware Nation of Indians
Authors: Pratt, J. G. J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Robinson, Charles ; Simpson, Samuel Newell
Date: August 3, 1858
This agreement offered property to John G. Pratt if he was successful in assisting in the adoption of a treaty between the U. S. government and the Delaware's to make lands in the Delaware Reserve available to the Missouri River and Rocky Mountain Rail Road. Pratt was to receive the equivalent of two sections of land--one near the Delaware Mission and one of timber land, a total of 1280 acres, and $5,000 if the treaty was ratified.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Delaware Indians; Economic development; Land acquisition; Land sales; Missouri River and Rocky Mountain Railroad; Native Americans; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Railroads; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 19, 1858
The benefactor of the city of Lawrence and much free-state activity generally, wrote Robinson from Boston, Mass., on several issues, including the establishment of a college and business/financial matters, but he made interesting reference to his (Lawrence's) own candidacy for governor on the American Party ticket. He did not expect to win, but instead proposed to simply be working to keep the "Americans" in line for a unified opposition to the Democrats in 1860.

Keywords: American Party; Boston, Massachusetts; Democratic Party (U.S.); Education; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Chas. Chadwick to Hiram Hill
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: November 17 & 24, 1858
Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, defending Quindaro from rumors that deemed the town defunct. Chadwick blamed the bad management of the Town Company for the current troubles, and described various opportunities Quindaro still had for further development. Though property was not selling at all, according to Chadwick, prospects for future railroad and ferry traffic still were positive. He expressed his disappointment at Robert Lawrence, and accused him of giving Chadwick a false impression of the likelihood of Hill winning the land claim dispute with Robert Robetaille. A businessman had landed with a great deal of machinery looking to build a "manufactory", and Quindaro's investors were doing all they could to woo him.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Causin, Nathanial Pope; Chadwick, Charles; Ferries; Gold mines and mining; Hill, Hiram; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Robert J.; Pikes Peak gold rush; Quindaro Chindowan; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad companies; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Timber; Town development; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Statement related to the Quindaro Town Company
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: November 22, 1858
Charles Robinson gave his consent as an individual member of the Quindaro Town Company that the Board of Trade could use the town company's printing press and type free of charge if they agreed to publish the Quindaro Chindowan on a weekly basis for three months beginning in December, 1858. The document also included Robinson's consent to pay Mrs. Nichols the $125 due her.

Keywords: Newspapers; Nichols, Clarina Irene Howard, 1810-1885; Quindaro Chindowan; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Town development; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Samuel C. [Smith] to "Dear Doctor" [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 1, 1858
Samuel Smith, Robinson's attorney and associate in matters having to do especially with the Quindaro venture, wrote from Lawrence on December 1, 1858, about certain farm issues--presumably having to do with the governor's home and property in Douglas County--which he was managing during Robinson's absence (Robinson was in Washington, D.C.). Smith also wrote: "We formed another Board of Trade at Quindaro and shall probably have the Chindowan [newspaper] issued in two weeks."

Keywords: Agriculture; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Miller, Josiah; Quindaro Chindowan; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad legislation; Railroad promotion; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Smith, Samuel C.; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Samuel C. [Smith] to "Dear Dr." [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 7, 1858
In this letter, also from Lawrence, Smith went into some detail about developments with respect to the Delaware lands, apparently connected to a railroad promotion scheme. The Indians "know that [Robert S.] Stevens is connected with the R. R. enterprise and this action of his . . . Has excited their mistrust and caused obstacles to rise in the way of such a treaty as you [Robinson] desire."

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Delaware Indians; English Bill; Indian treaties; Miller, Josiah; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Railroad promotion; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S. [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 15, 1858
In the mostly personal note from Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson briefly mentioned the business ("Lawrence case") he had before "the Land Commission" and then complains about the infrequency of his correspondence from home.

Keywords: Indian lands; Land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Washington, D.C.


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 19, 1858
The focus of this letter from Lawrence to Robinson in Washington, D.C., was the effort underway in Lawrence and Douglas County to attract a railroad and to have it built south of the Kansas River. Leavenworth, Kansas City, and Lawrence were obviously in the midst of their battle to gain advantage on the transportation front, and the decisions being made in Washington at that time with respect to land grants were vital to their future interests.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Jayhawkers; Johnnycake, Charles; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 29, 1858
In this letter from Lawrence, December 29, 1858, Smith mentions a few business matters (e.g., the railroad convention) but concentrates on the border conflict, with specific criticism leveled at John Brown and James Montgomery. "Captains Brown & Montgomery continue their 'reign of terror' in Linn and Bourbon counties. . . ."

Keywords: African Americans; Bleeding Kansas; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Newspapers; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves; Smith, Samuel C.


Charles Robinson, Washington, D.C. to William Hutchinson
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 31, 1858
Robinson speculated about the prospects for financing and building a railroad in the Kansas River valley. He contended that government land grants would be necessary for the successful construction and operation of a railroad. Robinson also defended himself against charges that he was not working hard enough to convince the U.S. Congress to support a railroad in the Kansas River valley.

Keywords: Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Railroad land grants; Railroads; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Announcement, Grand Opening Ball at the Eldridge House, New Year's Eve
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 31, 1858
This announcement advertises a Grand Opening Ball held at the Eldridge House in Lawrence, Kansas on December 31, 1858. It lists committee of arrangement and floor managers.

Keywords: Allen, Lyman; Babcock, Carmi William; Balls (parties); Blood, James; Branscomb, Charles H.; Davis, Alson C.; Deitzler, George W.; Eldridge House; Entertainment; Farnsworth, Loring; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Pratt, Caleb S.; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Stinson, Thomas N.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 6, 1859
From Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson wrote his wife back home in Lawrence regarding land and railroad issues that he was working on behalf of in the capital. Robinson briefly addresses issues having to do with Indian land disputes, but focuses even more on the competition for railroads being fought out in Washington between Lawrence, Leavenworth, and Kansas City. ". . . Lawrence must fight its own battles . . . . I hope to be able to make Lawrence a point on both roads before we get through." [For more information on this battle over railroads, see I. E. Quastler, "Charting a Course: Lawrence, Kansas, and Its Railroad Strategy, 1854-1872," Kansas History 18 (Spring 1995): 18-33. For a time, civic and business leaders sought to make Lawrence the regional rail center with an aggressive promotion's plan, but they ultimately, and perhaps inevitably, lost the prize to Kansas City; this piece is largely drawn from the author's 1979 book-length study, The Railroads of Lawrence.]

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian floats; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas City, Missouri; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; School lands; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. General Land Office


Letter, S. C. S. [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: January 6, 1859
Samuel Smith wrote to Dr. Charles Robinson from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, regarding the latest election events within the Kansas Territorial Legislature. The positions of Speaker and Clerk were not secured by William Roberts and himself, as had been expected, but had been filled by Alfred Larzalere and Byron P. Ayres as a consequence of some questionable internal party politics, so described by Smith. Smith also wrote Robinson of George Deitzler's desire to resume correspondence with him, and of a recent incident in which James Lane's portrait was defaced.

Keywords: Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Ayres, Byron P.; Babcock, Carmi William; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Branscomb, Charles H.; Deitzler, George W.; Delahay, Mark W.; Doniphan County, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Elder, P.P.; Elections; Free State Party; Goodin, Joel Kishler; Hutchinson, George W.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Larzalere, Alfred; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); McLane, George W.; Methodist Church; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Vaughan, Champion; Wright, John W.; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, John G. Pratt to Dr. C. Robinson
Authors: Pratt, J. G. J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900
Date: January 9, 1859
John G. Pratt, a Baptist missionary to the Delaware Indians, wrote to Charles Robinson from Delaware, Kansas Territory, describing the politics of the negotiations taking place with the Delaware Indian land purchase. "Old Sar-koxy," a Delaware leader, had indicated that Robinson was attending to his business, which angered younger Delaware delegates Isaac and Charles Johnnycake. Pratt indicated his confidence that the sale would take place regardless of who led the negotiations for the Delaware.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Native Americans; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, J. P. Root to Hon. Charles Robinson
Authors: Root, Joseph Pomeroy
Date: January 17, 1859
Joseph Root wrote to Charles Robinson from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, informing him of a development that was splitting the Republican (anti-slavery) Party. Root mentioned that a large majority of the free state House members had begun to call themselves "Radicals," or extreme Republicans. He stated that he would leave the party if, in order to be a Republican, he had to be a member of the "Jim Lane Montgomery Men." Root also informed Robinson that a court had been established in Lawrence in order to try violent offenders from Linn, Lykins, and Bourbon counties.

Keywords: Courts; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Smith, Samuel C.


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 20, 1859
Mostly personal, this brief letter from Washington to Sara R. in Lawrence announces Charles Robinson's impending departure from the nation's capital city and his intention to provide his wife with adequate domestic service in the future. But Robinson also mentions "our railroad bill" and the long awaited "Indian Commissioners decision probably on the float this week."

Keywords: Domestics; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian floats; Railroad land grants; Railroad legislation; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Stevens, Robert S.; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, C. Robinson to Geo. R. Morton Esq
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 9, 1859
In this typed "transcript" of a letter from Lawrence dated March 9, 1859, Charles Robinson confirmed Morton apparent conclusion that Robinson preferred Governor Salmon P. Chase for president in 1860. Robinson considered Chase "the purest & best Statesman in the country," and thought he was "more available than any other man of whatever shade of political faith," including William Seward. Robinson also comments on the Kansas scene which was "badly cursed with the most unscrupulous demagogues that ever afflicted any people, & there is at present but little union of effort or harmony of action among the free State men."

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Antislavery perspective; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Conway, Martin Franklin; Herald of Freedom; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Morton, George R.; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Vaughan, Champion; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Geo. L. Stearns Esq.
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: March 1859
Here Whitman wrote about his support on behalf of the National Kansas Committee of several activities: Dr. Doy's defense, John Brown (despite the fact that he had obtained additional funds "under false pretences"), and the organization of the Republican Party which was to be undertaken at convention in Osawatomie later that spring. Whitman feared that without some effort "the genuine standard Republicans" would fail to control the movement. He also mentioned an "unfortunate" altercation between Martin Conway and Charles Robinson on the streets of Lawrence.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Factionalism; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Osawatomie convention; Railroad land grants; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Sam F. Tappan to Dear Friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: April 17, 1859
In this letter, Samuel Tappan continued to keep Thomas Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts apprised of the current situation in Kansas Territory. He mentioned such topics as the Pike's Peak gold rush and the affairs of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, stating his belief that Robinson and Pomeroy were innocent of any charges of speculation. He praised John Brown's work to free slaves and the work of the Doy family in that same endeavor. However, he did not agree with Charles Robinson, who too readily looked to the interests of the Republican Party instead of supporting John Brown's work in the territory. Tappan appreciated the Atlantic Monthly magazine and Higginson's contributions to it.

Keywords: African Americans; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Doy, John; Free state perspective; Fugitive slaves; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Land speculation; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913


Letter, C. Robinson to My Dear L [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 9, 1859
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson described the complicated political situation which had arisen from the development of Quindaro. Personal disagreements between Abelard Guthrie, S.N. Simpson, Joel Walker, and himself were making progress difficult. Robinson hoped that, upon their resolution, they could move forward with securing a contract with the Parkville & Grand River Railroad, as well as plans for a college. Two church groups had expressed interest in opening up their own institutions, or working with Robinson to found one. Robinson included a plat map for a prospective site, to which he did not entirely give his support; he added comments regarding the admission of women to the college, and thanked Lawrence again for his support of their enterprises.

Keywords: Churches; Divorce; Emery, James Stanley; Guthrie, Abelard; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Parkville & Grand River Railroad; Railroad companies; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town development; Universities and colleges; Walker, Joel; Women; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, William A. Phillips, State Marshall, to Joel Grover
Authors: Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893
Date: June 24, 1859
William A. Phillips, Kansas State Marshall, wrote to Joel Grover, at the time a Douglas County Commissioner, appointing him to take the census in a township northwest of Lawrence. Grover had previously served in the Wakarusa War as captain of the first military company in Lawrence. Later, he became active in local government and held various positions until his death in 1879.

Keywords: Census; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Grover, Joel; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Settlement


Certificate, Funded Debt of Kansas Territory
Authors: Kansas Territory, Legislature
Date: July 12, 1859
This certificate documented Charles Robinson's investment of $500 in Kansas Territorial Bonds. Signed by H.J. Strickler, Auditor, and S. Medary, Kansas Territorial Governor.

Keywords: Bonds; Finance; Kansas Territory. Auditor; Kansas Territory. Governor; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Strickler, Hiram Jackson


Letter, C. [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: July 4, 1859
From Quindaro, Charles Robinson wrote to inform his wife about matters of business pertaining to this young city on the Kaw. He believed "railroad matters look[ed] very well for Quindaro, for example. Robinson also takes this opportunity to scold his wife about her attitude toward the people of Lawrence, some of whom she apparently thought were 'aristocratic or exclusive but I know of no one more exclusive than yourself; I do not know whether from pride of Character or circumstance or something else."

Keywords: Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroads; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, H. [Henry] Wilson to Dear [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Wilson, Henry , 1812-1875
Date: August 15, 1859
The senator from Natick, Mass., wrote to express to Robinson in Lawrence his and his friend's anxiety "about your new state." Wilson believed it a mistake for Kansas to have organized the Republican Party before gaining admission to the Union, but now that that had been done, "Don't for God's sake let the Democrats carry it."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Correspondence, John A. Martin to J. M. Winchell
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: September 7, 1859
In the weeks following the close of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, John A. Martin, the convention's secretary, and James M. Winchell, president of the convention, were occupied with the campaign for its ratification. This letter from Martin, dated Atchison, September 7, 1859, addressed some of the steps that had been and should be taken in the document's behalf during the bitter, partisan campaign leading up to the October 4, 1859, referendum.

Keywords: Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Nebraska Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. Robinson to My Dear Sir [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: November 12, 1859
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, expressing his concern that Lawrence's name was not included on a college proposal submitted by S.N. Simpson, which indicated he was not among the supporters of the enterprise. Robinson mentioned the upcoming election for Territorial delegate to Congress, in which Marcus Parrott, a Republican, was a favorite. He also sought advice from Lawrence about a complicated financial matter.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Elections; Finance; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Universities and colleges


Letter, unsigned [Charles Chadwick] to Hiram Hill
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: December 14, 1859
Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Chadwick reported that the Republicans (anti-slavery supporters) had been successful in recent elections. However, the economy was worse than the year before, according to Chadwick, money was scarce, and the city of Quindaro had not started collecting property taxes because the amounts would exceed the value of the property. A newspaper "The Kansas Tribune" had begun to circulate after a period in which there had been no newspaper, and the Parkville and Grand River Railroad was slated to be constructed through the town.

Keywords: Chadwick, Charles; Economic conditions; Elections; Hill, Hiram; Newspapers - Free State; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad companies; Railroad land grants; Rent; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Taxation; Telegraph; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Charles Robinson presented this claim (# 61) for losses suffered at the hands of the "territorial militia and marshal's posse" on May 21, 1856. His list of losses included a frame house, barn, medical library and surgical instruments. He also claimed $10,000 for false imprisonment that was not approved. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Guns; Medicine; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, Salmon Brown to R. J. Hinton
Authors: Brown, Salmon
Date: January 10, 1860
From North Elba, New York, Salmon Brown wrote R. J. Hinton briefly regarding his father role in the Pottawatomie Creek killings of May 24, 1856. Reportedly, Gov. Charles Robinson had told James Redpath that John Brown had confessed to him that "he helped kill the Doyles" but "if Gov. R said so he lies." Brown would not have confided in Robinson, since he had not "put any confidence in Robinson after that Lawrence treaty" (ending Wakarusa War in December 1855). Salmon doesn't answer the question, but portrays the killing of "those spies" as the heoric "first blow with the sword against Slavery in this county" and insists that "they were life preservers and they saved Kansas."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Salmon; Free state cause; Hinton, Richard Josiah; North Elba, New York; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 20, 1860
Charles Robinson wrote several letters to his wife in Lawrence as he traveled East in January 1860. From the Astor House, New York, on January 20, he wrote that Congress was not yet in session and that everyone expected the Democrats to oppose Kansas admission. It was possible that Robinson could "be sent for as a witness in Harpers Ferry affair" (Congressional investigation/hearings).

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; New York; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [John Hanna]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 26, 1860
In this letter to a friend in Greencastle, Indiana, Ewing made numerous observations about the state of Kansas politics, of which he wrote: "Politics in Kansas you know are a business to those caught in the whirlpool." Ewing thought the state government was "pretty well officered" but was concerned about prospects for the senatorial contest. "Lane is nearly dead with the politicians. . . But he is a power with the people. . . . I look on Lane as a decidedly bad man," even though he recognized Lane's positive "service to the cause before the [Lawrence free-state] Convention in Decr 1857."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Hanna, John; Journalism; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Moore, H. Miles (Henry Miles), b. 1826; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Vaughan, Champion


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: February 2, 1860
In a lengthy letter to his father back in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing, Jr., provided some observations and analysis of the Kansas political scene, especially as it pertained to the forthcoming election of U.S. senators. The counties north of the Kansas River would likely get either Marcus J. Parrott or Samuel C. Pomeroy, and the latter worried Ewing primarily because he was an Atchison promoter.

Keywords: Apprenticeship; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Denman, Hamp B.; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lancaster, Ohio; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Machinists; Moore, Ely; Ohio; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Russell, William H (of Russell, Majors and Waddell); United States. Congress. Senate; United States. General Land Office


Letter, C. Robinson to "Dear Madam" [Emma Willard]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to Willard's letter of March 22, Robinson wrote from Quindaro that he was "gratified" to learn of her interest in Kansas history and that she was "disposed to examine for yourself the random thrusts of the press." Robinson went on to make some interesting observations regarding his interpretation of Kansas events and the importance of the various factions, free state and proslavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Kansas question; Law and Order Party; Lecompton Constitution; Millard, Emma; Proslavery; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Gov'r [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to a letter of March 27 from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, Ewing wrote regarding the governor's forthcoming trip to Washington. Ewing mentioned several issues but was mainly concerned about the lobbying effort for the railroad bill and the future state's federal land grant.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Land grants; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Times; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Railroad promotion; Railroads; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Vaughan, John C.; Washington, D.C.


Resolution, Quindaro Common Council
Authors: Quindaro Common Council
Date: March 13, 1860
Date March 13, 1860, this "preamble and resolutions" discussed the current situation with regard to railroad developments and appointed Thaddeus Hyatt and Charles Robinson agents for the city to secure a land grant from the Congress to facilitate railroad construction through their town and beyond.

Keywords: Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Land grants; Missouri River; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad companies; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress


Letter, Emma Millard to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Millard, Emma
Date: March 22, 1860
Emma Millard [the annotation of "Willard" on the document is in error] of Troy, Kansas Territory was updating her "American histories down to the present time," and wanted the governor's take on some "historical" issues. She seems to have been especially concerned with some criticism Robinson had received recently regarding some of his own congressional testimony.

Keywords: Kansas history; Millard, Emma; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress


Letter, S. [Sara Robinson] to "My own dear Husband" [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: April 29, 1860
From Lawrence, Sara Robinson wrote a mostly personal letter to her husband upon her return from a visit to the KC area (Quindaro, etc.)--apparently to see Charles Robinson before his departure for the East.

Keywords: Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, S. [Sara Robinson] to "My Dearly loved Husband" [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: May 7, 1860
Another very personal letter from Sara in Lawrence to Charles back East. She wrote mostly of mundane matters but does mention speculation about Kansas admission and the Charleston convention.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, Ablard Wethier [?] to Josiah Miller, Esq.
Authors: Wethier, Ablard
Date: June 26, 1860
Ablard Wethier wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Josiah Miller, seeking the whereabouts of Charles Robinson and requesting that Miller serve him this notice to appear. Wethier claimed that Robinson had invested in the Quindaro Town Company but had sabotaged its endeavors. Wethier also stated that Robinson was "fatal to any enterprise he touches" and that "nothing but such an incubus [as Robinson] could keep down Quindaro."

Keywords: Fraud; Miller, Josiah; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Town companies; Town development; Wethier, Ablard; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Speech, Charles Robinson
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 26, 1860
This handwritten copy of Charles Robinson's September 26, 1860, speech welcoming William H. Seward to Lawrence contains some additional comments by Robinson to some friends to whom he was sending this copy.

Keywords: Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872


Henry J. Adams, Washington, D.C. to William Hutchinson
Authors: Adams, Henry J.
Date: November 14, 1860
Adams was in Washington as a special agent of Kansas Territory attempting to convince the U.S. Congress to pay claims for damages suffered by Kansas citizens during episodes of violence in the territory. Adams reported on the prospects of getting the claims paid during the upcoming session of Congress as well as on his concerns about being compensated for his lobbying efforts. He expressed particular concern that Charles Robinson intended to cheat him out of his pay. Adams also commented on Abraham Lincoln's election as president and the possible secession of Southern states in response to the election results.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Claims (see Damage claims or Land claims); Damage claims; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, C. Robinson to Dear Sir [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: November 15, 1860
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from a town of Medford, presumably in New England, to Amos A. Lawrence in Boston regarding relief efforts for Kansas. Robinson discussed the formation of a committee at Lawrence, which would "ascertain the objects of charity & minister to their necessities." He also described other relief efforts being carried out at the local level, which Robinson believed to be more effective than using nonresident disbursing agents or traveling solicitors.

Keywords: Cordley, Richard; Deitzler, George W.; Kansas Relief Committee; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Relief; Reynolds, Charles; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 7, 1860
From Washington, D.C., December 7, 1860, Charles Robinson wrote his wife regarding the likelihood of secession and the government's response should this happen. He expected Kansas to be admitted to the Union, perhaps as soon as some of the Southern states withdrew their members from the Senate, and also believe the chances were good that Congress would authorize payment of Kansas' claims against the government for damages--such payments would provide some help for those presently in need of relief assistance.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Railroad land grants; Relief; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Secession; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; United States. Congress


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 19, 1860
On December 19, 1860, Charles Robinson again wrote to his wife from Washington, D.C., where he was lobbying members of Congress and other officials on behalf of Kansas and himself. Numerous Kansans, including Robinson, who conducting a vigorous campaign for appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, were seeking positions in the new administration. "Unless men lie beyond all comprehension," wrote Robinson the ultimately unsuccessful office seeker, "I don't see how I can fail of the appointment."

Keywords: Blair, Montgomery; Conway, Martin Franklin; Gray, Alfred; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, S. N. Simpson to Honl. Amos A. Lawrence
Authors: Simpson, Samuel Newell
Date: December 22, 1860
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Samuel N. Simpson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts regarding the poverty in which Gaius Jenkins' family found themselves. James Lane had killed Jenkins in 1858 over a land claim, and it appeared that he was now taking measures to "keep her [Mrs. Jenkins] poor as long as possible." Simpson reminded Lawrence of his request to pay Jenkins fifty dollars as compensation for his imprisonment by federal troops at Camp Sackett, near Lecompton, in 1856. Jenkins had declined the payment at the time, but Simpson now solicited it on behalf of his widow and family.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, Jr.; Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Deitzler, George W.; Economic conditions; Jenkins, Gaius; Land claim disputes; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Relief; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Smith, George W.


Pamphlet, "To the Public", an expose of the business practices of Charles Robinson
Authors: Guthrie, Abelard
Date: December 31, 1860
Abelard Guthrie, who had been a member of the Quindaro Town Company along with Charles Robinson, accused Robinson of abusing his position as Treasurer of the Company towards fraudulent and financially disastrous ends. Guthrie claimed that "the duty if every man is to expose villians whenever he has indubitable evidence of their true character," and berated himself for having trusted Robinson for so long. His accusations against Robinson are numerous, and he contended that "there is a moral poison in his very touch that blights and ruins whatever it falls upon."

Keywords: Business enterprises; Fraud; Guthrie, Abelard; Quindaro Town Company; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Town companies; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, K.T., Robinson wrote his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor was not too worried, however, and wrote that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansas Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Senate; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 17, 1861
To his brother Hugh Ewing, who was apparently visiting family in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing wrote concerning his upcoming trip to New York and Washington. His major focus was the prospect of Charles Robinson being appointed Commissioner of Indian affairs in the new administration, and his (Ewing's) likely selection to the U.S. Senate if Robinson captured that position.

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 19, 1861
Charles Robinson wrote his wife Sara again on January 19, 1861, from Lawrence, confident that things still looked good from him in Washington. Robinson mentioned numerous men of political influence who he believed would be supportive and thus insure his appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

Keywords: Eldridge House; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing, Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 20, 1861
As with the January 17 letter to his brother, Ewing, Jr., stressed the significance of Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in this letter to his father in Lancaster, Ohio. Ewing expressed high regard for Robinson's abilities and believed he had wide support, from virtually every "republican of note in Kansas save Jim: Lane."

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Ohio; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Govr [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 24, 1861
This brief letter to Charles Robinson in Lawrence was to inform the "governor" of Ewing's activities on his behalf and to send him a copy of one of the half dozen or so letters Ewing had written in support of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs appointment. Letters reportedly went to Caleb B. Smith; John Sherman; Governors T. Corwin, William Dennison, and Salmon Chase; Joseph J. Coombs; and "Father," Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Coombs, Joseph J.; Corwin, Thomas; Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Ewing, Faith; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; Smith, Caleb B.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Sol Miller to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Miller, Solomon
Date: February 28, 1861
Written less than a month after Kansas became a state, Miller comments on the developing political situation as a carry over from the territorial period, reflecting, for example, on the conflict between the governor and James H. Lane and the selection of U.S. senators for Kansas. Miller had supported Robinson in the past and was now seeking appointment to a particular "Agency," but he refused "sell" his support to anyone for such a position.

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Solomon (Sol); Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Patronage, political; Political corruption; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Senate (see Unites States. Congress. Senate); Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate


Document, Quindaro, Taxes Received from Charles Robinson
Authors: Quindaro Township
Date: [August 1, 1860]
This is an itemized statement issued by Quindaro Township for the taxes paid by Charles Robinson in 1859 on property owned in the city of Quindaro.

Keywords: Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate; Real property tax; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Ambrotype [Photograph], Charles Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1850s
Ambrotype portrait of free-state leader Charles Robinson. Robinson also became the first governor of the state of Kansas.

Keywords: Ambrotypes; Free state supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Photograph, Sara Tappan Doolittle (Mrs. Charles) Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
Portrait of Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson, author, Free-State activist, and wife of Charles Robinson. This photograph was copied from an ambrotype taken in 1857.

Keywords: Cabinet photographs; Photographs and Illustrations; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Tucker, E. S.


Photograph, Charles Robinson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1860
A portrait of Charles Robinson, a doctor and politician. He attended the first Free-State meeting held December 23, 1854, Lawrence. In 1855, Robinson attended the First Free-State Convention in Lawrence. Robinson and James H Lane were instrumental in negotiating a truce to end the Wakarusa War in December, 1855. On May 10, 1856, Robinson was arrested for treason and taken to Lecompton. Over a year later, he was acquitted at a trail before Judge Cato, at Lecompton. Robinson presided over the Free-State Convention at Lawrence, 1857. Charles Robinson became the first Governor of Kansas and served from February 9, 1861 to January 12, 1863.

Keywords: Cabinet photographs; Photographs and Illustrations; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Tucker, E. S.


Reminiscence, Branson rescue
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: unknown
James Abbott, a free state activist who participated in several Territorial conflicts, including the rescues of John Doy and Jacob Branson, chronicled his account of the rescue of Jacob Branson by handwritten manuscript or personal interview, here presented as a typed transcript. Sheriff Jones, supported by the proslavery "bogus" legislature, had arrested Jacob Branson, a free state man who witnessed the murder of Dow. Abbott and his cohorts endeavored to rescue him, and were successful, though their actions were controversial even among fellow free state supporters.Certain aspects of Abbott's account of these events, however, are in contention with an earlier account by Samuel Wood; Abbott actively addressed these discrepancies in this document.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Big Springs Convention; Branson rescue (1855); Branson, Jacob; Coleman, Franklin M.; Dixon, Howard; Dow, Charles W.; Free state militia; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lock, Fred; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Saunders, Henry F.; Smith, Samuel C.; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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