Skip Redundent Navigation
Territorial Kansas Online 1854-1861 Explore Topics Territorial A-Z Map Lesson Plans  

Territorial A-Z

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 0-9


48 results for Religion:
Letter, S. L. Adair to Ladies Circle of South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts (draft)
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: not dated
Adair thanked the Ladies Circle for sending a fount, plate and cups for use in the church in Osawatomie. His appreciation was expressed in a religious sense. He asked for their prayers and said they have those of the church. He reported on sickness and on difficulties related to the church. He also commented on the "irreligion" in the area.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Churches; Illness; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Massachusetts; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion; Women


Photograph, Samuel Lyle Adair family
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1849
Portrait of Samuel Lyle Adair, Charles Storrs Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and Emma Florilla Adair. The family settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, where Adair was a minister and free state supporter. His wife was a half sister to John Brown and he occasionally stayed with the Adairs. The family was involved in various free state and relief activities.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Children; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Letter, R. A. Tovey to My Dear Wife
Authors: Tovey, Robert Atkins
Date: January 23, 1854
Robert Atkins Tovey, Sr., wrote to his wife, Eliza (Matthew) Tovey, at their home in Albany, New York. Tovey reported that, since the freezing of the Missouri River, mail was slow, and he had lost his job making stove fixings because of the inability to obtain materials from steamboat transport. Tovey also described his friend Swifts' problems maintaining ownership of his land claim, and the prospect that he himself may participate in a new town's development.

Keywords: Commerce; Labor; Land acquisition; Land claim disputes; Land claims; Missouri River; Religion; Squatters; Swift, J. Dedan; Tovey, Robert Atkins; Town development; Weather


Letter, James [Griffing] to My Beloved Augusta [Goodrich]
Authors: Griffing, James Sayre
Date: September 2, 1854
James Griffing wrote from Indianapolis, Indiana to his fiancee J. Augusta Goodrich in Owego, New York. Griffing, a Methodist minister, mentioned his plans to go to "Nebraska" and speculated that the "surplus population" in the eastern United States likely would lead to rapid settlement of the territory. Griffing expressed excitement about going to Kansas but he warned his fiancee that he would face hardships.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Griffing, James Sayre; Griffing, Jemima Augusta (Goodrich); Indianapolis, Indiana; Methodists; Religion; Westward expansion


Diary, scattered entries
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: September 10, 1854, through February 7, 1861
The diary entries are very scattered. The first entry indicated that Adair and his wife were considering coming to Kansas. The other entries relate to daily activities and Adair's ministry. He often mentioned who he visited and who was ill. The entry for Feb. 4, 1861, noted that Kansas had been admitted to the Union.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Diaries; Free state activities; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Letter, S. L. Adair to Rev. S. S. Jocelyn (draft)
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: September 19, 1854
Adair wrote from Hudson, Ohio, discussing plans to meet with a "Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society" party in Chicago. He indicated his family consisted of four people and described the quantity of boxes and luggage they would bring with them. He also wrote that he disapproved of traveling on the Sabbath.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Emigration and immigration; Jocelyn, S. S.; Migration, internal; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Ohio; Religion


Diary
Authors: Lovejoy, Julia Louisa
Date: December 10, 1854 - January 5, 1860
Julia Louisa Hardy Lovejoy and her husband Charles came to Kansas Territory in March 1855. Julia described the trip and their first months in Kansas Territory. However, Julia's diary entries were fairly sporadic so there were significant gaps in her account of life in Kansas Territory. Her writing was very emotional when describing the illness and death of their daughter Edith, when referring to the conflict in the territory, and when writing about her religious beliefs. The diary also contained some detail about daily life. The Lovejoys had two older children (Charles J. and Juliette) and a five year old daughter Edith when they came to Kansas Territory. Their son Charles may have come to Kansas before the rest of the family. Edith died in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on May 3, 1855. Julia was pregnant at the time and a son Irving was born September 17, 1855. Juliette married Dr. Samuel Whitehorn from Hudson, Michigan, on March 9, 1856, in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Juliette died November 20, 1860, at Manhattan, Kansas, at the age of 21. See the biographical sketch in the "Personalities" section for more detail on the Lovejoys.

Keywords: Baldwin, Kansas Territory; Daily life; Diaries; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lovejoy, Julia Hardy, 1812-1882; Lovejoy, Julia Louisa (see Lovejoy, Julia Hardy); Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Methodists; Religion; Riley County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Robert A. Tovey to My Dear Wife [Eliza (Matthew) Tovey]
Authors: Tovey, Robert Atkins
Date: December 17, 1854
Robert Atkins Tovey, Sr, having arrived in "Kanzas" Territory, wrote to his wife, Eliza (Matthew) Tovey, at their home in Albany, New York. Tovey described his working and living conditions, calling his Native American boss "most pleasant" and his living arrangements "comfortable," though infested with rats. Tovey, also a preacher, mentioned that the Methodist Church, the single place of worship in town, was willing to share their space with other denominations.

Keywords: Churches; Daily life; Emigration and immigration; Immigrants; Labor; Native Americans; Religion; Tovey, Robert Atkins


Letter, [Cyrus Kurtz] Holliday to My Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 31, 1854
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He described living conditions in Topeka. Holliday expressed his intent to write to Mr. McFarland and his thanks for letters recently received. He mentioned Samuel Y. Lum, a Congregational minister, who was sleeping in his cabin. He also mentioned his presidency with the Topeka Town Association, agency with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and his own business. Finally, Holliday expressed hopes of a sawmill and referred to the possibility of trouble with Missourians. A few lines have been cut and removed from the lower part of pages 7 and 8.

Keywords: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lum, S. Y; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Missourians; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Religion; Sawmills; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka Town Association; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Weather


Letter, Mary [Holliday] to My Dear H [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: December 31, 1854
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday at Topeka, Kansas Territory. A thoughtful review of the previous year, her letter gave thanks for protection from harm despite sorrows and calamities. Using Biblical allusions and paraphrases, she joyfully expressed hope that eternal bliss begins with a well lived life, and encouraged her husband to consider misspent time and to carry out good New Year's resolutions.

Keywords: Holidays; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; New Year; Religion; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Constitution of the Descandum Kansas Improvement Company
Authors: Soule, A.
Date: 1855
The document contained seven articles which related to the purpose of the company and how to become a member. This company sought to improve Kansas Territory by civilizing and enlightening the settlers. It was signed by the treasurer of the company. The organization appeared to be a satirical one, perhaps aimed at the various emigrant aid companies.

Keywords: Descandum Kansas Improvement Company; Immigration and early settlement; Kansas Frontier; Religion; Soule, Amasa; Stock certificates


Sermon Record of Samuel Lyle Adair
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: January 14, 1855, through December 30, 1860
The sermon records listed the biblical text, the date, the place where the sermon was given, and the subject. Later entries also included brief remarks. Many of the sermons were given in homes so these locations provide some idea of the neighborhood. The sermon record also listed funeral sermons.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Congregationalists; Funerals; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion; Vital records


Letter, S. L. Adair to Rev. S. S. Jocelyn
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: May 3, 1855
Samuel Adair wrote from Osawatomie to thank Rev. Jocelyn, an official of the American Missionary Association, for his encouragement and fiscal support of $100. He said they will use it to pay what they owe and then make it last as long as possible. His wife has taken in sewing and washing to make ends meet but Adair asks Jocelyn not to share that information. He discussed the weather and his religious missionary efforts in detail. Adair also commented on migration to Kansas and motives of those coming. This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; American Missionary Association; Emigration and immigration; Jocelyn, S. S.; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Migration, internal; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Letter, Wm. E. Goodnow to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: June 10, 1855
William Goodnow, brother of Isaac Goodnow, wrote from Shannon, Wild Cat Creek, Kansas Territory, to his wife back East. Goodnow described his experiences participating in the development of the nearby town of Manhattan, having attended a city council meeting and anticipating the founding of a newspaper. Goodnow also mentioned religious services and "Sabbath Schools" currently running out of settler's homes, and commented on the numerous emigrants who had traveled to Kansas Territory only to quickly give up and return home.

Keywords: Diseases; Election fraud; Emigration and immigration; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Livestock; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Methodists; Newspapers; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Religion; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory; Town development


Letter, E. Nute, Jr. to Rev. E. E. Hale
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: October 3, 1855
Ephraim Nute, a Unitarian minister writing from Lawrence, K. T. to Edward Everett Hale, described the natural environment, economic developments, politics, religious affairs, and daily life in Kansas Territory. Nute commented on the need for more saw mills, efforts to construct a church, prospects for "free-thinking Christianity," and the possibility of armed conflict in the territory.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Churches; Construction; Daily life; Economic development; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Houses; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Religion; Sawmills; Timber; Unitarian churches; Violence


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: November 31, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Lexi[ng]ton, Missouri to his wife in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. The low river had forced him and other steamboat passengers to come ashore 25 miles short of Lexington. Once there, he heard rumors of war, reporting that Missourians "all armed to the teeth" were entering the Territory. Hill was sick and wished to turn back, but fellow travelers Mr. Whitney and Judge Johnson planned to continue. Hill included a brief message for his adopted son, Arthur.

Keywords: Hill, Hiram; Religion; Sickness (see Illness); Steamboats; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Whitney, Thaddeus L.


Record of Marriages performed by Rev. Samuel Adair
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: December 9, 1855, through January 1, 1861
Adair recorded each marriage he performed. He listed the bride and groom, the location (often a home) and the date. These 21 entries are the marriages he performed in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Marriage; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion; Vital records


Letter, S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: c. 1855
This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; American Missionary Association; Baptists; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Congregational churches; Missionaries; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Letter, John Bayless to My Dear Daughter [Mrs. C. J. Minion?]
Authors: Bayless, John
Date: January 14, 1856
John Bayless wrote from Kirkwood, Broome County, New York to his daughter, Mrs. C. J. Minion [?] , in Kansas Territory. Bayless encouraged her, assuring her that she would have no regrets about moving to the Territory, despite hardships she might find there. He affirmed that courage and perseverance would "overcome all obstacles", and hoped that she was being regular in her attendance to religious services at the Mission. Bayless also told her he planned to join her in the Territory the coming Spring.

Keywords: Bayless, John; Daily life; Domestics; Kansas Territory; Postal service; Religion


Letter, Owen Brown to Dear Son John [Brown]
Authors: Brown, Owen , 1771-1856
Date: March 27, 1856
Owen Brown, who died at age 85 on May 8, 1856, wrote his son, John Brown, about mundane family matters, his delight at the regular arrival of letters from his son, and his faith in God. He also mentioned correspondence with Congressman J. R. Giddings and the vote in Congress to send a committee "to Kansas to investigate the situation."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Owen, 1771-1856; Giddings, Joshua R. (Joshua Reed), 1795-1864; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Religion; United States. Congress


Circular, To the Clergy of Massachusetts
Authors: Lowell, Charles
Date: June 27, 1856
A circular written by several Boston church pastors urging other Massachusetts clergy to solicit request their congregation members to send aid to free state settlers in Kansas.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Churches; Circulars; Lowell, Charles; Religion


Printed Letter, Lewis Bodwell to Sir and Brethren
Authors: Bodwell, Lewis
Date: 1856
Lewis Bodwell was a Congregational minister located in Topeka, Kansas Territory. He reported that his activities to organize a Congregational Church in Topeka had resulted in 24 members. Apparently, he was working under the auspices of the Home Missionary Church. He wrote that he only held one service a month in a "public hall," as it was also used by three or four other denominations. He indicated that he had preached "in the open air, in ball-rooms and bar-rooms and kitchens." He implied that there was a great need to form a permanent church to aid the congregation by having its own center of activitiy but also to take the financial burden off the Home Missionary Society. This item is undated and the years 1856 and 1860 are both written on it in pencil.

Keywords: Bodwell, Lewis; Churches; Community life; Congregational churches; Congregationalists; Missionaries; Religion; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Ephm. Nute to Dear Fr. [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: January 5, 1857
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

Keywords: Education; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Religion; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; School buildings; Teachers; Town development; Universities and colleges


Letter, D. R. Barker to Brother [Samuel] Adair
Authors: Barker, D. R.
Date: February 16, 1857
Writing from Mercer, Pennsylvania, Barker, a classmate of Adair's at Oberlin College, commented on the political situation in regard to Kansas and pro-slavery forces including pro-slavery churches.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Barker, D. R.; Free state prospects; Oberlin College; Pennsylvania; Proslavery activities; Religion; Slavery


Letter, F. [Francis] M. Serenbetz to E. E. [Edward Everett] Hale
Authors: Serenbetz, Francis M.
Date: March 14, 1857
Francis M. Serenbetz, a German immigrant and minister, wrote from Hartford, Connecticut to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Serenbetz informed Hale that he planned to lead a group of about a dozen families of fellow Germans to Kansas to establish a "christian community." Attached to the letter is an agreement, dated February 8, 1857, outlining the communal labor and property arrangements for the proposed Kansas settlement.

Keywords: Collective settlement; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Ethnic groups; Germans; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Hartford, Connecticut; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Religion; Religious communities; Serenbetz, Francis M.


Letter, E. [Ephraim] Nute to Rev. E. E. [Edward Everett] Hale
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: April 6, 1857
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute included a list of books that he wished to add to his Unitarian church library. Nute commented on the difficulties experienced by those attempting to spread Christianity in Kansas. He also observed that immigration to Kansas was increasing.

Keywords: Books; Churches; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Entertainment; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Libraries; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Nute, Ephraim; Reading; Relief; Religion


Diary, G. W. Paddock
Authors: Paddock, G. W.
Date: April 12, 1857 - July 28, 1860
G. W. Paddock was a minister and free state supporter who came to Kansas Territory in 1857. He describes his daily activities and his religious work, as well as his impressions of the city of Wyandotte while the constitutional convention was meeting there. His entries for this time period indicate he visited the convention, although he does not discuss the substance of the proceedings. The 1857 portion describes some of the free state controversies. He also mentions working with American Indians; however, his descriptions are often stereotypical and uncomplimentary. A number of entries from this diary were selected, but the entire diary is not included.

Keywords: Daily life; Free state supporters; Paddock, G. W.; Religion; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, Joseph Bryant to Friend [John] Brown
Authors: Bryant, Joseph
Date: April 23, 1857
One of Brown's devoted "Christian friends," Joseph Bryant, New York, wrote to pledge his continued support, both financial and spiritual; although Bryant was "poor in purse," he could give some financial help and would solicit more from others.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Bryant, Joseph; Finance; Free state supporters; New York, New York; Religion; Religious communities


Letter, I. T. Goodnow to Hon. John Wood
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: May 11, 1857
Isaac Goodnow wrote from his travels in Keokuk, Iowa, to John Wood, promoting another addition to the town of Manhattan: a non-denominational church. As he was appointed an Agent by the church Trustees, Goodnow was now also soliciting support for the construction of a church, as well as a college. He also alluded to the living conditions in Kansas as"education & morals rather above average, but in present wealth poor."

Keywords: Churches; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Religion; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Town settlement


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: July 17, 1857
In a very brief letter to his "wife & children," John Brown wrote from Iowa, en route to Kansas, that travel was slow because of the freight they were hauling and that little news of interest was coming from Kansas." He closed: "I would give anything to know that I should be permitted to see you all again in this life. But Gods will be done. To his infinite grace I commend you all."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Religion; Transportation; Travel


Circular, Information for Kanzas Immigrants, 1857
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: 1857
Thomas Webb compiled this more comprehensive version of his earlier circulars by the same name. Containing much of the same information as the previous versions, such as details about the logistics of the trip to Kansas and subjects such as weather, farming, Indians, and employment, it features a large section that describes individual town settlements. This circular also addresses the proslavery and free state conflict, though in a nonpartisan manner, considering the interests of both groups.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Books; Brown, John Carter; Circulars; Crops; Diseases; Education; Food; Guns; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Libraries; Merchandise; Merchants; Native Americans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Newspapers; Religion; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Town settlement; Transportation; Travel literature; Weapons (see also Guns); Weather; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, G. U. Parsons, Minister, and Benj. R. Edmonds, Clerk of Congregational Society, to the Committee on Church Extension of the General Association
Authors: Edmonds, Benjamin R.; Parsons, G. U.
Date: March 19, 1858
Writing from Ogden, Kansas Territory, the authors stated that they had been voted an appropriation by the Congregational Union of New York to build a church but that had not received any of the money. However, their numbers had increased and they had received subscriptions to begin work. They needed additional money to finish the building and were requesting $200 from the committee. They described the advantages of Ogden being where the Smoky Hill and Republican rivers flowed into the Kansas, near Fort Riley, and with prospects for a railroad.

Keywords: Churches; Congregational Union of New York; Congregational churches; Edmonds, Benjamin R.; Ogden, Kansas Territory; Parsons, G. U.; Religion; Riley County, Kansas Territory


Letter, J. P. Root (?) to Rev. S. Y. Lum
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: March 19, 1858
Mr. James Root wrote from Wyandotte about the possibility of providing support to organize a Congregational Church in that city. He explained that a number of denominations had organized but they had a small number of members and no buildings. A Congregational minister, Mr. Storrs, had been dividing his time between Quindaro and Wyandotte but was going to focus on Quindaro in the future. He asked for whatever support was possible.

Keywords: Churches; Congregational churches; Lum, S. Y; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Religion; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Historical Sketch, Confession of Faith and Covenant, and Standing Rules of the First Church of Christ in Wabaunsee, Together with a Catalogue of the Officers and Members
Authors: First Church of Christ, Wabaunsee
Date: April 1, 1858
This printed pamphlet contained all of the items listed in the title for the First Church of Christ in Wabaunsee, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Church of Christ; Churches; Community life; Daily life; Religion; Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory; Wabaunsee, Kansas Territory


Minutes of the Third Session of the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Authors: Kansas and Nebraska Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church
Date: April 15-19, 1858
The annual conference was held in Topeka, Kansas Territory from April 15 through 19, 1858. The minutes included the names of those attending as well as the business conducted. It listed the various ministerial appointments in Kansas and Nebraska as well as the membership of the committees. The minutes reported on educational efforts at Baker University and Blue Mount Central College. It contained information on the church's stand on slavery and temperance. The constitution of the Kansas and Nebraska Conference Missionary Society was included in the report as were statistics for the various churches.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Baker University; Baldwin, Kansas Territory; Big Springs, Kansas Territory; Bluemont Central College; Burlingame, Kansas Territory; Churches; Community life; Denison, Joseph; Dennis, Levin B.; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Grasshopper Falls, Kansas Territory; Holton, Kansas Territory; Indianola, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Methodist Church; Methodists; Oskaloosa, Kansas Territory; Paddock, G. W.; Palermo, Kansas Territory; Prairie City, Kansas Territory; Religion; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Temperance; Topeka, Kansas Territory; White Cloud, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, John S. Brown to Rev. Mr. [Edward Everett] Hale
Authors: Brown, John S.
Date: May 2, 1858
John S. Brown wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Brown informed Hale that he had substituted for Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, for the previous six months while Nute lectured in the East. Brown stated that he wanted to serve in Kansas as a missionary but lacked financial resources. He asked Hale for funds to support his missionary efforts.

Keywords: Brown, John S.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Religion; Unitarian churches


Letter, E. Nute to [Edward Everett] Hale
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: May 10, 1858
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Blood, James; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; Emigrant aid companies; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Loans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Nute, Ephraim; Panic of 1857; Religion; Unitarian church buildings


Letter, J. [John] S. [Stillman] Brown to Dear Willie
Authors: Brown, John S.
Date: June 13, 1858
This letter, written from Lawrence by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son William, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins. Brown also mentioned a sermon he preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.

Keywords: Brown, John S.; Churches; Community life; Jenkins, Gaius; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Lecompton Constitution; Nute, Ephraim; Religion; Unitarian churches; Weather


Letter, J. J. I. [John J. Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: October 24, 1858
After nearly two weeks in the territory, Ingalls was somewhat more optimistic about his prospects, and in this letter to his father, Elias Ingalls, John Ingalls wrote of the gold rush and his legal business, which "opens very well." but he was still weary of "social conditions," as there were no churches in Sumner and "a total disregard of the Sabbath." Atchison, where he had gone in a futile search for an Episcopal Church, was little better in this regard.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Churches; Community life; Courts; Free state settlers; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Lawsuits; Pikes Peak gold rush; Religion; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Weather


Draft of Annual Report to the American Missionary Association
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: 1858
This report covered the year 1857 but also described the organization of the Congregational Church in Osawatomie. Adair was preaching at a number of rural churches in the area. It reported on membership and attendance and other religious activities. He also mentioned activities of other denominations.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; American Missionary Association; Churches; Congregational churches; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion


Letter, L. [Leigh] R. Webber to Miss Brown [daughter of John Stillman Brown]
Authors: Webber, L. R.
Date: October 22, 1859
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown. Webber wrote about sickness in the Brown family and about other personal matters, such as her father's work as a minister. He also kept her apprised of politics, both in Kansas and on the national scene, and spoke briefly of John Brown's "insane undertaking."

Keywords: Brown, John S.; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fires; Illness; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Religion; Sickness (see Illness); Slave power; Webber, Leigh R.


Letter, John Ritchey to "Friend Stevens" [A.D. Stevens]
Authors: Ritchie, John , 1817-1887
Date: March 7, 1860
Topeka's "John Ritchey" [Ritchie] wrote this letter dated March 7, 1860, to A. D. Stevens from Franklin, Indiana, where he had "been spending the winter with his family." Although Ritchey mentioned John Brown and his own fervent views in opposition to "Slavery," the focus of his brief comments to his former Kansas comrade, who was scheduled to die on the Charlestown gallows on March 17, were an expression of concern for Steven's eternal soul: "I can see but one way left for me to be of any service to you and that is to direct your mind to the Savior. 'Ye must be born again.'"

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Charles Town, Virginia; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Religion; Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Slavery; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Topeka boys; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Minutes of the Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Fifth Session
Authors: Kansas and Nebraska Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church
Date: March, 1860
The annual conference was held in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, on March 15, 1860. The report contained a great deal more information than the Third Session from 1858 and included information about Methodist Churches in all parts of Kansas (as well as Nebraska) Territory. Its committee reports included education, slavery, temperance, the conference missionary society, etc.

Keywords: Baker University; Bluemont Central College; Churches; Community life; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Methodist Church; Methodists; Religion; Slavery; Temperance


Report, Robert Simerwell to the American Baptist Publication Society
Authors: Simerwell, Robert W.
Date: May 1860
Robert Simerwell, a missionary for the American Baptist Publication Society, sent this report to the national headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Although he had been suffering with an illness, Simerwell still managed to distribute some religious literature. He was also planning on attending an organizational meeting for a church on Mission Creek, and he seemed encouraged by Kansan's eagerness to participate in Sunday School.

Keywords: American Baptist Publication Society; Auburn, Kansas Territory; Baptists; Churches; Missionaries; Religion; Schools; Simerwell, Robert W.


Letter, M. M. Campbell to Brethren of the Osawatomie B[ible] S[ociety]
Authors: Campbell, M. M.
Date: June 26, 1860
This letter, written by M. M. Campbell from Monrovia, Kansas Territory, requested information about the progress of colportage in the Osawatomie area, asking if they had divided the area into districts and appointed colporteurs to distribute religious materials to Kansas settlers. To encourage this, Campbell mentioned the great success of other colporteurs, such as Brother Blood from Manhattan, Kansas. He also encouraged the residents of Osawatomie to remain faithful to their duty as Christians, and to work for the furtherance of the kingdom. Campbell requested more detailed information about the local Bible Society.

Keywords: American Bible Society; Books; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Missionaries; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Religion; Stanton, Kansas Territory


Report, Robert Simerwell to the American Baptist Publication Society
Authors: Simerwell, Robert W.
Date: October 1, 1860 - November 1, 1860
This report to the American Baptist Publication Society was written by Robert Simerwell, a missionary in Kansas Territory. It includes information about the number of families he visited, the number of miles he traveled, and the number of books he sold, as well as other pertinent information. The end of the report contains a note to Rev. B. Griffith that recounts his travels and his interactions with churches that were being formed in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: American Baptist Publication Society; Baptists; Books; Churches; Missionaries; Religion; Simerwell, Robert W.


Letter, Sherman Bodwell to Rev. Peter McVicar
Authors: Bodwell, Sherman
Date: November 7, 1860
Peter McVicar, a native of Eastport, Maine, and a graduate of Andover Theological Seminary, moved to Kansas Territory in 1860 to become pastor of Topeka's Congregational Church. This letter from church clerk Sherman Bodwell of Topeka pertained to McVicar's pastoral call and requested that the American Home Missionary Society continue to provide partial support for the minister.

Keywords: American Home Missionary Society; Andover Theological Seminary; Bodwell, Sherman; Churches; Congregational churches; Maine; McVicar, Peter; Religion; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


First Thanksgiving Sermon
Authors: McVicar, Peter
Date: November 29, 1860
Apparently pretty typical of the Rev. Peter McVicar's sermons, this one is entitled "First Thanksgiving Sermon." It was delivered in Topeka on November 29, 1860, just weeks after he assumed the pastorate of the Congregational Church. McVicar focused on the concept that God's blessings were not to be measured by the accumulation of money or property, making specific comments about Kansas. He suggested, for example, that citizens of Kansas Territory who gathered together on that day should be especially thankful for the hardships endured by "early" settlers in order to establish freedom from slavery.

Keywords: Churches; Congregational churches; McVicar, Peter; Religion; Sermons; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Thanksgiving Day; Topeka, Kansas Territory


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

The current URL is http://www.territorialkansasonline.org/~imlskto/cgi-bin/index.php?SCREEN=keyword&selected_keyword=Religion&
sort_by=true&submit=Go&allresults=1.
This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.