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21 results for Redpath, James, 1833-1891:
Receipts and Expenditures, State Kansas Committee
Authors: Massachusetts State Kansas Committee
Date: c. 1856 - 1857
One of many ledger-type listings of donations to and expenditures of the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee for the support of Kansas settlement and the activities of "Capt J[ohn] Brown" and other free state partisans.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state cause; Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Receipts; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, [Thaddeus] Hyatt to My dear Friend [Horace White] (No. 26); Telegraphic dispatches (No. 27 and No. 28)
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: August 19, 1856 - November 24, 1856
This copy of a letter, which is added onto the end of another copied letter, was addressed to Horace White and was written by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter began with a description of Hyatt's sleeping arrangements the past two nights, and then moved on to other personal matters. He concluded the letter with committee business, mentioning his fear that funds and provisions were not truly being handed out to the neediest settlers. He also detailed an encounter with Mr. Carpenter, whose mother was Clarina Nichols. At the end of the letter were copies of two telegraphic dispatches sent by Thaddeus Hyatt to William F. M. Arny, general agent for the committee, on November 22th and 24th. They both concern Dr. Root, who was involved in Kansas relief.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Carpenter, A.O.; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas Central Committee; National Kansas Committee; Nichols, Clarina Irene Howard, 1810-1885; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Sharps rifles; Telegraph


Letter, James Redpath to Sir
Authors: Redpath, James , 1833-1891
Date: February 1857
This printed form letter was written by James Redpath to the people of Boston asking for money for the people of Manhattan, Kansas in order to build a church, school, and library. Redpath had been appointed their agent to solicit this money. He included a list of references at the foot of the page.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Cabot, Samuel; Churches; Community life; Dana, Charles A.; Education; Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Williams, John M. S.


Letter, James Redpath to Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Redpath, James , 1833-1891
Date: February 5, 1857
James Redpath, a journalist who had spent some time in Kansas, wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, an abolitionist and agent of the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. Redpath began the letter with a vehement denouncement of Mr. Cutter, after Mr. Cutter allowed the Missourians to arrest him peacefully. Redpath was appalled that Cutter did not even fire a shot. He was obviously distraught, and he sought advice from Higginson on how he should proceed.

Keywords: Cabot, Samuel; Cutter, Calvin M.; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Immigration and early settlement; Redpath, James, 1833-1891


Letter, James H. Greene to Capt. John Brown
Authors: Greene, James H.
Date: March 24, 1857
James Greene, who had spent two years in Kansas himself, wrote from his Jefferson (hometown of Senator Benjamin F. Wade), Ashtabula Co., Ohio, newspaper office (Ashtabula Sentinel) to inform his friend that he would be publishing Brown's circular "soliciting aid for Kansas" and to ask what Brown's future plans were. The news from the territory was not good, according to Greene, and he wondered if there would be war or peace. Greene was still hopeful that the "free state men will eventually triumph," but most of his neighbors believed Kansas "will be a Slave State."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Giddings, Joshua R. (Joshua Reed), 1795-1864; Greene, James H.; Herald of Freedom; Press; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Wade, Benjamin Franklin


Letter, C. [Charles] Robinson to Rev. E. E. [Edward Everett] Hale
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: April 7, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Emigrant aid companies; Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Order No. 1, from the Headquarters of the Kansas Volunteers for the Protection of the Ballot Box
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: August 3, 1857
E.B. Whitman, Quarter-Master General of the Kansas Volunteers, composed this formal order in response to the Topeka Legislature's adoption of James Lane's resolution to organize the people in protection of the ballot boxes during the next elections. Whitman, who had just been appointed as Quarter-Master General by Lane under the Ballot Box resolution, requested that each Company of the Volunteers elect their own Quarter-Master to take an inventory of firearms held by their own Company.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Election fraud; Free state militia; Kansas Volunteers; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 11, 1857
On August 11, 1857, Marsh reported from Lawrence that the governor was "still here with his Troops, but nobody pays any regard to him, or them." According to D. W. Wilder, Annals of Kansas, however, all but forty troops left on August 3, the day of the election under the Topeka Constitution, which Marsh also mentioned. His primary concern remained the October election, which many feared would not be fairly conducted despite the governor's promises, and the growing talk of another Free State Party boycott of the polls.

Keywords: Cato, Sterling G.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Election, Topeka Constitution, August 1857; Free State Party; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Constitution; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: September 28, 1857
In this letter to Stearns, Marsh expressed confidence that the October election would turn in favor of the Free State Party. Marsh had been traveling in the "Southern Counties" and was encouraged: "You may rest assured, that the people are united and earnest." He predicted a victory for Marcus Parrott and "a good working majority" for the Free State Party in both houses of the legislature. Unless he received further instructions from the committee, Marsh planned to leave Kansas about three days after the election.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Crusader of Freedom; Doniphan, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, Ms. Maria Felt to Dear Mr. [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Felt, Maria
Date: June 25, 1858
Miss Felt wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, telling of her journey from Clinton, Massachusetts to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Apparently, she was emigrating to Kansas in order to teach school. Miss Felt and her party traveled by train until they reached Alton, Illinois, where they took a steamer along the Mississippi to St. Louis. From there they traveled to Jefferson City and finally reached Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. At that point they traveled to Lawrence by stagecoach and Indian canoe. Once she had arrived in Lawrence, which she found to be a pretty town, she became acquainted with James Redpath, R. J. Hinton, Samuel Tappan, and George Stearns. She also called on Ephraim Nute, but she disliked both him and his wife, writing that they "sat up like two icicles." This letter appears to have been edited at some later date.

Keywords: Felt, Maria; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Railroads; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Schools; St. Louis, Missouri; Stagecoaches; Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation; Weather; Women


Letter, James Hanway to R. J. Hinton
Authors: Hanway, James
Date: December 5, 1859
In response to the Redpath/Hinton notice in the Lawrence Republican, Hanway wrote from his home in Shermansville, Franklin County, to share his story about "our friend John Brown," and he hoped their efforts would convey to all Brown's "the character" and "motives" and "place him in his true light before the world." Hanway highlights the attempted "rescue of Lawrence" in May 1856; the subsequent "'Tragedy'" on Pottawatomie Creek, about which Brown personal told Hanaway, "it was a just act, to take the lives of those 5 pro-slave ruffians"; how John Brown was a surveyor who used his profession to gather intellegence among proslavery settlers; the fact, according to Hanway, that the Doyles and others were actively engaged in efforts to run free state settlers out of the area; and specifically denies the story that Frederick Brown was "insane."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Hanway, James; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery settlers; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shermansville, Kansas Territory; Slave power; Surveyors


Letter, William F. Creitz to "Col. James Redpath"
Authors: Creitz, William F.
Date: December 17, 1859
William F. Creitz of Holton, who had served under Aaron Stevens as captain of a Kansas militia company, wrote Redpath regarding "the particulars of 'Old John Brown's' final departure from this territory." Brown and company, which included "eleven fugitives," reached Holton on January 27, 1859, and Creitz described the events that followed, to which he was an "eyewitness" and participant, including the Battle of the Spurs. Creitz's "article" was prepared "to assist you [Redpath] in your praiseworthy undertaking that of publishing the lives of those heroic men." Redpath published "Echoes of Harper's Ferry" in 1860, and Richard J. Hinton used this material in his "John Brown and His Men (1894).

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Battles; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state militia; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Holton, Kansas Territory; Jackson County, Kansas Territory (see also Calhoun County, Kansas Territory); Kagi, John Henry; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Militia; Nebraska Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sharps rifles; Slave power; Spurs, Battle of the; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Topeka, Kansas Territory; Underground railroad; United States marshals


Letter, C. G. Allen to Redpath and Hinton
Authors: Allen, C. G.
Date: December 1859
Allen, a "minister of the Gospel" at Cottonwood Falls, K.T., wrote in response to the Redpath/Hinton call for "anecdotes & reminiscences" concerning "the brave & philanthropic [John] Brown," who the preacher first met in Lawrence in 1856. Allen left Lawrence when a call came for volunteers to aid in the defense of Osawatomie in August of that year and while there engaged saw his first "Border Ruffians," who he described as "miserable specimens of humanity. They were ragged & dirty. Their cloths & faces were to a considerable extent covered with tobacco spit." Allen and the men he was with actually missed the Battle of Osawatomie by moving south before the attack in an effort to find the attackers before they reached the town.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Child, Lydia Maria Francis, 1802-1880; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Free state settlers; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Osawatomie, Battle of; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sharps rifles; Stanton, Kansas Territory


Letter, L. F. Parsons to "Dear Friends Redpath & Hinton"
Authors: Parsons, Luke F.
Date: December 1859
Parsons, "a soldier under John Brown" in Kansas, who fought in the battles of Black Jack and Osawatomie (see, Twenty-fifth Biennial Report, KSHS, 135-136), wrote this letter from Osawatomie to James Redpath and Richard J. Hinton in response to their "notice in the Republican in regard to publishing the life of John Brown & associates at Harpers Ferry & your request for information." In addition to his Kansas activities, Parsons was with Brown and company in Iowa during the winter of 1857-58 and mentions, as did Kagi and others, the "Lyceums" conducted by Brown around their evening campfires and the "thorough course of military instruction under Col. Whipple as Drillmaster." Parsons, who was obviously proud of his association with Brown, apparently just missed being in on the Harpers Ferry raid--he had returned to KT during the long wait and was not recalled.

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Owen; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Coppoc, Barclay; Coppoc, Edwin; Forbes, Hugh; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas City Metropolitan; Kansas City, Missouri; Leeman, William H.; Moffett, Charles; Osawatomie, Battle of; Parsons, Luke F.; Pate, Henry Clay; Quakers (see Society of Friends); Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Rice, Benjamin; Springdale, Iowa; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tabor, Iowa; Tidd, C. P.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Salmon Brown to R. J. Hinton
Authors: Brown, Salmon
Date: January 10, 1860
From North Elba, New York, Salmon Brown wrote R. J. Hinton briefly regarding his father role in the Pottawatomie Creek killings of May 24, 1856. Reportedly, Gov. Charles Robinson had told James Redpath that John Brown had confessed to him that "he helped kill the Doyles" but "if Gov. R said so he lies." Brown would not have confided in Robinson, since he had not "put any confidence in Robinson after that Lawrence treaty" (ending Wakarusa War in December 1855). Salmon doesn't answer the question, but portrays the killing of "those spies" as the heoric "first blow with the sword against Slavery in this county" and insists that "they were life preservers and they saved Kansas."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Salmon; Free state cause; Hinton, Richard Josiah; North Elba, New York; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, James Hanway to My dear Sir [James Redpath]
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 12, 1860
From Shermansville, Franklin County, K.T., James Hanway, a friend and follower of John Brown during the Kansas troubles, wrote to an associate, presumably James Redpath, about a book entitled The Public Life of John Brown. Redpath was not named in document, but he wrote this book on John Brown, which was published by "Thayer & Eldridge" in 1860. Hanway enjoyed the book, thought it was, "on the whole," "a correct life of the old man," but offered to author "the facts," especially as regards the Pottawatomie massacre of May 1856. In this lengthy, detailed letter, Hanway, who was with John Jr., and some others who were not on Pottawatomie Creek when the killings took place, argued that the action was fully justified under the circumstances and that Brown gave the orders, even though he personally killed none of the victims.

Keywords: Brown, Frederick; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hanway, James; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Massacres; Ottawa Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Thompson, Henry


Letter, Wm Handy to Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Handy, William
Date: April 3, 1860
This letter, written in Boston by William Handy, was addressed to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a radical abolitionist minister from Worcester, Massachusetts. In this letter, Handy proposed strategies to deal with the potential arrest of James Redpath in the aftermath of Harper's Ferry. Higginson and Redpath had both supported John Brown's raid on the arsenal in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in 1859. After John Brown's execution some of his followers had fled the country, but Higginson and Redpath had both remained in the United States. Handy feared that Redpath would be arrested, so he wanted to figure out the best way to protect Redpath's rights.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Courts; Handy, William; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; United States Government


Letter, [William] Handy to My Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Handy, William
Date: April 6, 1860
This letter was written by William Handy of Boston and was addressed to Thomas W. Higginson, a supporter of John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia. Handy wanted to let Higginson know about a meeting in Boston to decide upon a plan of action. By this point, John Brown had been executed and several of his followers had fled the country. Most of those who remained in the United States wanted to resist the government; consequently, Handy emphasized that at this meeting "none but fighters are eligible." Handy believed that it would not be wise to rely on the legal system to give Brown's supporters a fair trial. Handy also spoke of a beautiful pistol that would soon be presented to Miss Sanborn "for her bravery in defending her brother." He also mentioned that Franklin Sanborn had been arrested in Concord for some misdemeanor; he was unsure of the details.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Courts; Handy, William; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917


Political Anti-Slavery Convention
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 29, 1860
This announcement called for a political anti-slavery convention to be held in Boston on May 29, 1860. The men who called the convention, who were listed at the end of the announcement, believed that neither of the current political parties truly represented their anti-slavery sentiments. They stated their goal in terms of liberty for all people, both black and white.

Keywords: African Americans; Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Political conventions; Proslavery supporters; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Slave power; Slavery; Slaves; United States Government; United States. Constitution


Letter, Sam F. Tappan to Rev Thomas W Higginson
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: June 24, 1860
Samuel Tappan wrote this letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Thomas Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts. Tappan was leaving for Colorado in a week or two, presumably to meet some family members working the gold fields. He also mentioned Theodore Parker, a supporter of John Brown who had a terminal illness and passed away while in Italy. The Leavenworth Times had also mentioned his death, albeit briefly. Tappan also spoke of James Redpath's biography of John Brown, including a portion of the book that discussed a mail coach robbery in the summer of 1856.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Colorado; Crime; Gold mines and mining; Higginson, Charles J.; Pikes Peak gold rush; Postal service; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Violence


Photograph, James Redpath
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
James Redpath came to Kansas Territory as a reporter for the New York Tribune, but he soon became a participant in the free state cause. He was involved with John Brown and wrote a biography on him that was published in 1860. He reported on the free state movement in Topeka.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Card photographs; Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Journalists; Photographs and Illustrations; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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