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27 results for Proslavery:
Resolutions, Legislature of South Carolina, House and Senate [1849]
Authors: South Carolina, House of Representatives
Date: February 12, 1849
This Resolution, approved by both the House and Senate of South Carolina in 1849, resolved that the principles of the Wilmot Proviso would not be applied to the recently acquired Mexican territory. The Wilmot Proviso, passed in the U. S. House of Representatives in 1846 and 1847, resolved that, upon the acquisition of the Mexican territory, "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of said territory, except for crime, whereof the party shall first be duly convicted." The Wilmot Proviso was never passed in the U. S. Senate.

Keywords: Mexican territory; Mexico, Republic of; National politics; Proslavery; Slavery; South Carolina; Wilmot Proviso, 1846


Letter, John Doy to Mr. Strong
Authors: Doy, John
Date: October 19, 1854
John Doy, writing from Lawrence, K. T. to a Mr. Strong, described an incident in which a Westport, Missouri man charged him extra money for notary services because he "was a Yankee."

Keywords: Antislavery; Doy, John; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Notaries; Proslavery


Letter, [anonymous/unsigned] to General Samuel C. Pomeroy
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 14, 1855
The author of this length epistle, chose not to sign his name but offered his observations about Kansas affairs "which may or may not be of service to you." In essence the correspondent offers a free staters perspective--not an abolitionist one--on the "modus operandi" of the pro-slave party for KT. Slavery, or the slave system, meant "despotism" to this individual, and he believed "pro slavery men will use every means" to control the territory, which would soon go to free state "if the contest were a fair and even one." It was critical that Americans elect a president in 1856 who would "do right, a man who loves the Union the whole Union as it is . . . ."

Keywords: Despotism; Election, Presidential, 1856; Free state; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Proslavery; Slave power


Pro-slavery Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855
This flag was created by pro-slavery Missourians who captured Free State supporter Reverend Pardee Butler of Atchison in April 1855. The pro-slavery men sent Butler adrift on a raft down the turbulent Missouri River with this flag flying from it. The Missourians wanted others to know that the minister had helped slaves escape. Although he was expected to drown, Butler survived.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Butler, Rev. Pardee; Butler, Rev. Pardee; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Flags and banners; Greeley, Horace, 1811-1872; Missourians; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Slavery; Underground railroad; Violence


Statement, William Phillips, Sworn before Samuel Lecompte, Chief Justice of Kansas Territory
Authors: Phillips, William
Date: May 23, 1855
William Phillips, a Leavenworth resident, testified before Chief Justice Samuel Lecompte and described an incident in which Phillips, an anti-slavery proponent, was tarred and feathered by a group of Weston, Missouri pro-slavery supporters.

Keywords: Antislavery; Border ruffians; Chief justice; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Phillips, William; Proslavery; Proslavery activities


Proslavery Meeting
Authors: Tebbs, W. H.
Date: August 2, 1855
The documented summarized the proceedings of a meeting held by proslavery supporters to determine the proper time and place to hold a convention in which they would nominate a candidate to the U. S. Congress. They decided to have the convention on August 29, 1855 at the Shawnee Manual Labor School.

Keywords: Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Proslavery support; Shawnee Manual Labor School; Territorial politics; United States. Congress


Public Speaking!
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: September, 1855
This broadside listed six places where John W. Whitfield planned to speak during his campaign for reelection as the delegate to Congress from Kansas Territory. Whitfield was a proslavery supporter. The speeches were to be given between September 24 and September 29, 1855. He planned to speak at Dr. Chapman's, Otta Creek; Henry Sherman's; Old Pottawatamie Mission; Sugar Mound; crossing of the Little Osage, and Fort Scott. A barbecue was scheduled for Fort Scott on September 29.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Chapman, J.B.; Elections; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Sherman, Henry; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879


History of Kansas: and Emigrant's Guide.
Authors: Chapman, J. Butler
Date: 1855
The title page of the printed volume indicated that it contained "a description geographical and topographical--also climate, soil, productions and comparative value with other states and territories, including its political history, officers-candidates-emigrant colonies-election, abolition, squatter and pro-slavery contentions and inquisitions; with the prospects of the territory for freedom or slavery. Mr. Chapman was a resident of the territory and the information in the booklet was compiled by traveling through Kansas Territory in 1854. The description covers most of the territory and includes information about Native American tribes and lands.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Delaware Indians; Economic conditions; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Emigrant aid companies - Pro-slavery; Emigration and immigration; Free state prospects; Land; Landscape; Native Americans; Proslavery; Settlement; Wyandot Indians


Photograph, Camp Saunders, Kansas Territory
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
View of Camp Saunders, a Pro-Slavery stronghold, located 12 miles southwest of Lawrence, Kansas Territory, 1856.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Camp Saunders, Kansas Territory (see also Fort Saunders); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Fort Saunders, Kansas Territory (see also Camp Saunders); Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery


"Southern Rights" flag
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 21, 1856
Pro-slavery forces carried this flag while attacking the anti-slavery stronghold of Lawrence. Sheriff Samuel Jones led the group in sacking the town on May 21, 1856. A group of South Carolinians known as the Palmetto Guards participated in the attack, and flew their "Southern Rights" flag over the "Herald of Freedom" newspaper offices and the Free State Hotel before destroying the buildings.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Flags and banners; Free State Hotel; Herald of Freedom; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Objects; Palmetto Guards; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; South Carolina; Violence


Articles of Association
Authors: Proslavery Association of Clay County, Missouri
Date: June 7, 1856
Written document concerning the formation of a organization in Missouri with the purpose of making Kansas a slave state. Includes the purpose of the organization and three articles.

Keywords: Kansas question; Missouri; Money; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Proslavery prospects; Proslavery support


The voice of Kansas; let the South respond.
Authors: Anderson, Joseph C.; Atchison, David R.; Boone, Albert G.; Buford, Jefferson ; Russell, William ; Stringfellow, B. F.
Date: June 24, 1856
The Law and Order Party made this appeal to southerners to provide support for the proslavery cause in Kansas, in the form of emigration, financial donations, and/or moral support. The text of the main portion of this pamphlet was written by David Atchison,William H. Russell, Joseph C. Anderson, A. G. Boone, B. J. Stringfellow, and J. Buford. A printed note at the end of the text was addressed to Col Jefferson Buford and encouraged him to go to the South to solicit support for the proslavery advocates in Western Missouri and Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Anderson, Joseph C.; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Boone, Albert G.; Buford, Jefferson; Law and Order Party; Proslavery; Proslavery support; Russell, William H (of Russell, Majors and Waddell); Southern emigrants; Southerners; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.


Letter, W. W. Updegraff to William Hutchinson
Authors: Updegraff, W. W.
Date: August 5, 1856
W. W. Updegraff, writing from Osawatomie, KT, described pro-slavery forces stealing horses from free state supporters, the need of free state settlers in the Osawatomie area for financial assistance, and his views on the potential for war in the event of John C. Fremont's election as president in the November 1856 election.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Horse stealing; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Relief; Updegraff, W. W.


Letter, Jonathan Crews to Thomas N. Stinson
Authors: Crews, Jonathan
Date: November 21, 1856
Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

Keywords: Business; Courts; Crews, Jonathan; Indiana; Proslavery; Stinson, Thomas N.


George Clarke Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Desk brought to the Kansas Territory in 1855 by George Clarke, who was a Pottwatomie Indian agent and slave holder. Clarke was a notorious proslavery leader during the border war period. He was suspected of killing a free state man, Thomas W. Barber of Lawrence in 1855. While Clarke was sitting at this desk in his Lecompton home in 1856, a shot was fired at him. He was uninjured, but the bullet put a hole in his desk. Clarke was driven out of the territory in 1858.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; House furnishings; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles
Authors: Mendenhall, Richard
Date: January 19, 1857
Richard Mendenhall was a missionary at the Shawnee Friends Mission in the 1840s. He returned to Indiana for a time but moved back to Kansas Territory in the fall of 1855. He was in Kansas during the territorial era and wrote Wattles describing an attact on the Friends Mission on August 20, 1856 by proslavery forces. He indicated that they were told to leave or the mission would be burned. However, Mendenhall wrote that David Atchison and other proslavery supporters asked that the Friends be left out of the violence. Mendenhall also described an attempt to form a settlement by men from Georgia about 3 miles from Osawatomie. He wrote that they were friendly at first but they later committed depredations. In response, about 100 free state men ran them off, took $500 in clothing and provisions, and burned a fort they had built. Mendenhall believed that the Battle of Osawatomie was a response to this.

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Free state support; Friends Mission, Lykins County; Georgia; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Mendenhall, Richard; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Missionaries; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Proslavery settlers; Society of Friends; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, Edw. [Edward] Hoogland to Thos. N. Stinson
Authors: Hoogland, Edward
Date: January 21, 1857
Edward Hoogland, writing from Dundee, Yates County, New York, expressed his views on how to turn Tecumseh, Kansas Territory into a "flourishing" town. He suggested to Thomas N. Stinson, a Tecumseh resident that the town, if properly advertised, would be attractive to settlers not comfortable residing in free state towns like Topeka or Lawrence.

Keywords: Hoogland, Edward; Proslavery; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Stinson, Thomas N.; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Town development; Town promotion


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: May 18, 1857
This brief letter from Samuel Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee was dated May 18, [1857), from Boston, Massachusetts. Among other business matters, he reported the fact that the two men now owned "one half of the 'Squatter Sovereign' (Stringfellows organ)" and "[Robert] McBratney of Ohio owns the other half--We have hoisted a Free State Flag!"

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Boston, Massachusetts; Business enterprises; Free state; Freedom's Champion; Hyatt, Thaddeus; McBratney, Robert; Proslavery; Squatter Sovereign; Stringfellow, John H.


Lecompton Constitution (as printed in D.W. Wilder's Annals of Kansas (1868)).
Authors: Lecompton Constitutional Convention
Date: November 7, 1857
The Lecompton Constitution, the second constitution drafted for Kansas Territory, was written by proslavery supporters. The document permitted slavery (Article VII), excluded free blacks from living in Kansas, and allowed only male citizens of the United States to vote. There were three separate votes on the Lecompton Constitution: December 21, 1857, January 4, 1858, and August 2, 1858. In the final vote, residents of Kansas Territory rejected the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Constitutions; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Slavery


Lecompton Constitution (manuscript version)
Authors: Lecompton Constitutional Convention
Date: November 7, 1857
The Lecompton Constitution, the second constitution drafted for Kansas Territory, was written by proslavery supporters. The document permitted slavery (Article VII), excluded free blacks from living in Kansas, and allowed only male citizens of the United States to vote. There were three separate votes on the Lecompton Constitution: December 21, 1857, January 4, 1858, and August 2, 1858. In the final vote, residents of Kansas Territory rejected the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Constitutional conventions; Constitutions; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Slavery


Letter, Wm. Stanley to Dear [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Stanley, William
Date: January 12, 1858
Shortly after Halderman left Leavenworth for a trip east (Washington, D. C., it is nearly certain), William Stanley wrote him from Leavenworth regarding some "excitement" that had occurred there the very day Halderman left. Many were fearful of "attack" and thus the alarms were "sounded. . . . Hundreds of free state men were soon in arms, and the proslavery party exhibited more of apprehension than I have ever witnessed before." He mentions proslavery men leaving for Shawnee, the fact that many free-state men had recently been driven out of nearby Kickapoo, that John Calhoun was given a military escort to Lecompton, and his confidence that the [Lecompton] constitution would pass the Congress.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state; Free state militia; Halderman, John Adams; Kickapoo, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Proslavery; Stanley, William


Letter, Geo. W. Clarke to Saml. J. Jones
Authors: Clarke, George W.
Date: June 2, 1858
George W. Clarke, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Samuel J. Jones (Sheriff Jones), described a May 30, 1858 incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declared that he was innocent of the charges and viewed Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also described the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamelton, Charles A.; Jayhawkers; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; United States. Army; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to Jas. W. Denver
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: June 3, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on events of May 30, 1858 involving Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker's attempt to arrest George W. Clarke on charges that Clarke participated in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Smith questioned Walker's authority to arrest Clarke, observing that Walker's arrest warrant had been issued by a justice of the peace from a township, Mapleton, that did not yet exist. Smith commented on the general state of unrest in the area and declared that the "County is in fact in open rebellion . . . . complete anarchy prevails." He encouraged Governor Denver to come to Fort Scott to assess the situation for himself and to help restore order.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Smith, H. P. A.; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, Jason Brown to Rev. S. L.. Adair
Authors: Brown, Jason
Date: April 4, 1859
Jason Brown wrote to Samuel Adair from Akron, Ohio. Evidently, Adair had written him concerning placing a claim for property lost while in Kansas. Brown wrote that he doesn't think any radical anti-slavery supporters would receive any funds from Congress in the near future. He believed that if he had been on the pro-slavery side his claim would be paid. He also inquired about marking the grave of his son.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Akron, Ohio; Antislavery; Brown, Jason; Damage claims; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Ohio; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Tombstones


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [G. W. Brown]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: April 13, 1859
With regard to the formation of the Republican Party at the forthcoming Osawatomie convention, Ewing told George W. Brown, editor of Lawrence's Herald of Freedom, why he believed this was the right course for the "opposition" to take at this time. The Free State Party had, in his opinion, accomplished its objectives, and the Democratic Party contained a proslave faction and was affiliated with the administration. Ewing's objective was "to secure an organization of the Republican or opposition party at Osawattomie [sic], on a just and rational platform, and led by honest & conservative men."

Keywords: Big Springs Convention; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free State Party; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Osawatomie convention; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Proslavery; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Letter, C. Robinson to "Dear Madam" [Emma Willard]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to Willard's letter of March 22, Robinson wrote from Quindaro that he was "gratified" to learn of her interest in Kansas history and that she was "disposed to examine for yourself the random thrusts of the press." Robinson went on to make some interesting observations regarding his interpretation of Kansas events and the importance of the various factions, free state and proslavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Kansas question; Law and Order Party; Lecompton Constitution; Millard, Emma; Proslavery; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Bowie Knife
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1861
Knife made in a blacksmith shop operated by James Howell near Clay, Arkansas, for the purpose of fighting Kansans. Manufactured in 1861, it was used in the Civil War battles of Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove in Arkansas, and Wilson's Creek and Price's Raid in Missouri. Abolitionists and freestaters stereotyped pro-slavery defenders as always carrying Bowie knives. Indeed, Benjamin Stringfellow advised fellow slavery supporters in 1855 to "enter every election district in Kansas . . . and vote at the point of the bowie knife and the revolver.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border disputes and warfare; Bowie knife; Civil war; Howell, James; Missouri; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Swords and daggers; Violence


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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