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32 results for Proslavery supporters:
Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Mr. [Amos Adams] Lawrence
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 22, 1854
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Samuel Pomeroy wrote from a settlement, which would come to be called Lawrence, in Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Lawrence was an investor who sponsored the emigrant group who would settle the town of Lawrence. Pomeroy reported that Charles Robinson had been elected President of the Lawrence Association, the first governing body of the town. He was enthusiastic about the abundance of timber resources in the area, which, once secured from the Indians, would make for a good business enterprise. Emigrants were arriving in droves, filling the hotels and increasing demand for land claims. Though he remained positive, Pomeroy warned "Don't make yourselves believe that the slave holders have given up Kansas!" and anticipated a political battle during the upcoming Territorial Legislature election.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Branscomb, Charles H.; Business enterprises; Elections; Emigration and immigration; Hotels; Illness; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Timber; Town development


Letter, S. H. W. to Dear Bro Isaac [Goodnow]
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: June 15, 1855
S. H. W. wrote from New England to Isaac Goodnow in Kansas Territory, reporting on the proceedings of the Philadelphia National Kansas Nebraska Convention, an organization that he described as "Pro Slavery to the Back Bone!". He implored that New Englanders of Kansas have "Back Bone", and fight against slavery. The author further narrated "the north is uniting. The plot thickens, and the struggle comes", and disparaged President Pierce's administration, hoping for an anti-slavery one in the future. The letter includes a short note from Mrs. S. H. W., which exclaimed at Ellen Goodnow's traveling to Kansas alone.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; National politics; Pierce administration; Proslavery supporters; Women


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: October 13, 1855
One week after arriving at his sons' settlement ("Brownville") near Osawatomie, Brown wrote the family back east that although most were sick when he first arrived, they "appear now to be mending." The trip across Missouri was without incident, except for problems with a sick horse and their "heavy load." Brown then wrote briefly of the Adairs, the "most uncomfortable situation" in which he found his children upon his arrival, and other things including prairie fires and finally the political situation in the territory. In fact, at this early date, John Brown "believe[d] Missouri is fast becoming discouraged about making Kansas a Slave State & think the prospect of its becoming Free is brightening every day."

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Agriculture; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Election, Topeka Constitution delegates to convention, October 1855; Free state; Free state settlers; Missouri; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Settlement; Weather


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: December 16, 1855
Soon after his return from Lawrence, where he and other volunteers had successfully defended that place, John Brown wrote from Osawatomie to give his family "a brief account of the invasion," the so-called Wakarusa War. As it turned out, Brown provided some interesting details about their preparations and arrival in the besieged city and the negotiations that were ongoing when the Browns came on the scene. The Free State leaders, according to Brown, skillfully accomplished and signed an agreement with Governor Shannon that was "much to their own liking."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Barber, Thomas W.; Bogus legislature; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Coleman, Franklin M.; Dow, Charles W.; Free state cause; Free state militia; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery supporters; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, M. S. Cecilia Sherman To Mrs. [Sara] Robinson
Authors: Sherman, Margaret S. C.
Date: May 25, 1856
Margaret Sarah Cecilia (Mrs. John) Sherman wrote Sara Robinson on May 25, 1856, regarding Governor Robinson's captivity to date. He had been arrested on May 10 at Lexington, Missouri, and subsequently returned to the territory. At this time he was being held in Leavenworth, where Sherman and many other of Robinson's friends had the opportunity to visit with him, and Sherman was able to attest to his good treatment. She makes interesting, favorable reference to Robinson's stay in Lexington and to "Captain [John W.] Martin of the Kickapoo rangers," who "seemed to have charge" of the governor in Leavenworth. (Congressman John Sherman of Ohio was the brother of William T. Sherman, later of Leavenworth, and a member of the Howard Committee, investigating the Kansas affair.)

Keywords: Damage claims; Free state cause; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lexington, Missouri; Martin, John W.; Preston, Colonel; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sherman, John, 1823-1900


List of participants and casualties at the battle of Black Jack
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: June 2, 1856
According to this document listing the participants and those "men wounded in the battle of Palmyra or Black Jack," son-in-law Henry Thompson was "dangerously wounded."

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Black Jack, Kansas Territory; Bondi, August; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Oliver; Brown, Owen; Brown, Salmon; Carpenter, A.O.; Free state militia; Militia; Missourians; Palmyra, Kansas Territory`; Pate, Henry Clay; Proslavery supporters; Thompson, Henry; Whitman, E. B.


George Clarke Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Desk brought to the Kansas Territory in 1855 by George Clarke, who was a Pottwatomie Indian agent and slave holder. Clarke was a notorious proslavery leader during the border war period. He was suspected of killing a free state man, Thomas W. Barber of Lawrence in 1855. While Clarke was sitting at this desk in his Lecompton home in 1856, a shot was fired at him. He was uninjured, but the bullet put a hole in his desk. Clarke was driven out of the territory in 1858.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; House furnishings; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Dr. [Franklin Crane]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 1, 1857
Cyrus Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to Franklin Crane, a prominent doctor in Topeka. Holliday was anxious to get back to Kansas, but family illness had prevented his departure for the territory. He reported on several people who had been involved in Kansas including such pro-slavery supporters Colonel Titus and Preston Brooks, who had died recently. He also commended Gov. Roberts (?) for his efforts on behalf of Kansas.

Keywords: Brooks, Preston Smith; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Free state prospects; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Proslavery supporters


Letter, E. Nute to Mr. [Amos Adams] Lawrence
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: March 4, 1857
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. In a letter marked "private", Ephraim Nute wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Nute responded to Lawrence's suggestion that the college sit on the "broad table land on Mt. Oread or Capitol hill"; he supported the idea but feared that issues surrounding the land title would compromise the plan. Nute agreed with Lawrence about the importance of establishing schools, but he also concerned that the current political situation was not conducive to it, as the Territorial government was in the hands of "usurpers". He felt that "only one life now stands between us and the reopening of the civil war."

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Border disputes and warfare; Land claims; Land titles; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Mount Oread; Nute, Ephraim; Proslavery supporters


Letter, Charles Mayo to G.W. Collamore, Esq.
Authors: Mayo, Charles
Date: June 11 1857
Charles Mayo, writing from Olathe, Kansas Territory, described to George Collamore the budding township and his experiences there. Mayo had invested shares in the town and hoped it would become the county seat. He encouraged Collamore to influence free state men to go to Olathe and settle there, in order to out populate the proslavery majority already established.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Johnson County, Kansas Territory; Mayo, Charles; Olathe, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Santa Fe road; Shawnee Indians; Town companies; Town development


Letter, Charles Mayo to G.W. Collamore
Authors: Mayo, Charles
Date: June 17, 1857
Charles Mayo wrote from Olathe, Kansas Territory, to George Collamore, seeking his advice. Mayo told Collamore that the proslavery citizens of Olathe were urging him to accept the appointment of Magistrate in the county, though Mayo worried how that might affect his standing with the free state party.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Collamore, George W.; Free state perspective; Johnson County, Kansas Territory; Lawyers; Mayo, Charles; Olathe, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: September 7, 1857
Nearly two months into his K.T. assignment and stay in Lawrence, Marsh reported several significant observations about the Free State Party: Governor Walker's apparent commitment to a fair canvas, the rapidly approaching territorial election (October 1857), and the money so far spent and needed for the campaign. He also observed that the Constitutional Convention was opening in Lecompton, and wrote: "If you could see the town, and people of Lecompton, and had the opportunity that I have had to witness their Plantation Manners--I think you would at once be reminded of the Scriptural inquiry, 'Can any good thing, come out of Nazareth?'"

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, S. [Samuel] L. Adair to Mr. J. B. [John Brown]
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: October 2, 1857
Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Daily life; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state prospects; Free state support; Health; Land claims; Lecompton Land Office; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Preemption law United States; Proslavery supporters; Sickness (see Illness); Slave power; Tabor, Iowa; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: October 16, 1857
Joseph H. Trego wrote from his cabin in Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife Alice in Rock Island, Illinois, about his journey from Kansas City to Sugar Mound. His friends, Thomas Ellwood Smith (Ell) and his brother Edwin (Ed), and himself were poorly prepared as they expected to stay in public houses during the journey, not camp outside as their wagon transportation preferred. As the road they took went right down the Missouri state line, Trego contrasted the well-established farms to the East with the "open, wild prairie" to the West. He and his brother, upon arriving at their cabin, found that they had "Hoosier" neighbors (from Indiana), who were pleasant but proslavery. Trego recounted the difficulty they had acquiring home furnishings and food, fighting adverse weather at every turn. He spoke at length of how he was comforted by writing to his wife, as he and his friends greatly missed their families.

Keywords: Daily life; Domestics; Hunting; Kansas City, Missouri; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes River; Merchandise; Proslavery supporters; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Transportation; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Wagons; Weather


Letter, Your affectionate Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: December 21, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego, in addition to elaborating on hunting and mill work, described at length the skirmishing between local free state and proslavery men, which had been continuous throughout the summer and fall. He reported the manner in which Missourians had seized and occupied lands in the absence of their owners, who were free state men. "Bogus courts" had brought the free state men who defended their lands to court, which resulted in so many fees owed that the men had to sell their land to pay them; the new owners were usually Missourians. Trego accused proslavery supporters of fabricating stories about destruction caused by warring Abolitionists in order to draw the support of the U.S. troops. Controversy over the Lecompton Constitution flourished in free state circles; the Free State Legislature in Topeka had repealed the "bogus laws" of the Territorial Legislature and appointed James Lane the head of a free state militia.

Keywords: Bogus laws; Bogus legislature; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Business enterprises; Free state legislature; Free state militia; Hunting; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Military; Mills and mill-work; Missourians; Proslavery supporters; Sharps rifles; Skirmishing; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Report of the President of the Council and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas, on the result of the vote of December 21st for the Lecompton Constitution, and on the result of the election of Januray 4th under said Constitution.
Authors: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 14, 1858
This printed document reported the votes on the Lecompton Constitution from elections held on December 21, 1857, and January 4, 1858. It was prepared by G. W. Deitzler, Speaker of the House and C. W. Babcock, president of the Council of the territorial legislature. The vote showed a majority of 5,574 for the constitution with slavery but 3,012 of those votes came from areas the authors felt were sparsely settled and thus indicated fraudulent votes. The same charges of fraud applied to the election for state officials, though the free state candidates claimed a small majority in all races. The results of the vote on the Lecompton Constitution on January 4, 1858, showed a majority of 10,000 against the Lecompton Constitution as presented in a proclamation from J. W. Denver, Secretary and Acting Governor.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Elections; Free state activities; Free state supporters; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters


Letter, William Franklin Johns to Dear Uncle [J. W. Denver]
Authors: Denver, Mary C. ; Johns, William Franklin
Date: February 7, 1858
Williams Franklin Johns wrote from Wilmington, Ohio, to his uncle, James William Denver, who was "Acting Governor" in Kansas Territory. Johns told his uncle about his recent return to school and of his desire to travel to Lecompton. He also recounted the comments of a family friend, Mr. Creamer, who made Kanzas sound like an "awful place" full of villianous "Yanks" who should be swept out. The last page is a short letter from Mary C. Denver, which contained news of family and friends, but also included commentary about Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Denver, Mary C.; Education; Emigration and immigration; Johns, William Franklin; Ohio; Proslavery supporters


Letter, Lucian J. Eastin to My Dear Sir [Gov. James Denver]
Authors: Eastin, Lucian J.
Date: February 20, 1858
Lucian J. Eastin, a proslavery supporter and editor of the Herald in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, wrote to Governor James Denver praising him for his efforts and congratulating him for his successes. Eastin told Denver that he feared the Lecompton Constitution would not pass, and he referred to recent incidents of election fraud. He also requested money from Denver so that he could print Denver's recent address and proclamation to the Kansas people.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Eastin, Lucian J.; Economic conditions; Election fraud; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Newspapers; Proslavery supporters; United States. Congress


Letter, Galusha A. Grow to Gov. C. Robinson
Authors: Grow, Galusha Aaron
Date: May 5, 1858
Congressman Galusha Aaron Grow, a Pennsylvania Republican, wrote Robinson regarding the Lecompton debate and the need to get a large free state vote against that proposed constitution. If it were "the dough faces will be exterminated next fall."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; English Bill; Grow, Galusha Aaron; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery supporters; United States. Congress


Letter, [C. Robinson] to "My Dear Sir" [Henry Wilson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 12, 1858
This important document is reportedly a copy of a letter from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, May 12, 1858, to Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson in which the Kansas governor expresses confidence that the Lecompton Constitution will be overwhelmingly defeated in the upcoming election and makes numerous observations about the state of politics--present and future--in Kansas. Robinson believed that half the Democrats would oppose the Lecompton instrument because they knew that freestaters would dominate any state government that would be admitted under it and subsequently "the Constitution would be changed in the 'twinkling of an eye.'" Thus, he predicted no Kansas admission until at least December 1859, and in the meantime expected Democrats to "take the lead in aiding in developing the resources of Kansas, & [the Democratic Party] will claim to be the special friends of our infant State."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Election, Lecompton Constitution, August 1857; English Bill; Factionalism; Free State Party; Free state supporters; Journals; Lecompton Constitution; Partisan press; Press and politics; Press and propaganda; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to General [James W. Denver]
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: May 16, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported that conditions were peaceful in the southeast section of the territory. Smith stated that he had accompanied a group of dragoons on an unsuccessful mission to find and arrest James Montgomery and other free state supporters who allegedly had engaged in violent activities in the area. Smith commented that in his view the "ultra Pro Slavery party" was partly responsible for the unrest in southeast Kansas Territory, but he also believed that "moderate free state" supporters should act to stop the violence.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; Smith, H. P. A.; United States. Army; Violence


Letter, Geo. W. Clarke to Saml. J. Jones
Authors: Clarke, George W.
Date: June 2, 1858
George W. Clarke, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Samuel J. Jones (Sheriff Jones), described a May 30, 1858 incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declared that he was innocent of the charges and viewed Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also described the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamelton, Charles A.; Jayhawkers; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; United States. Army; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: June 10, 1859
From Sumner on June 10, 1859, just days after the election for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote his father about the "well fought" contest in a county (Atchison) that was "an old stronghold of pro-slavery democracy." Ingalls won, of course, even though he at first "regarded the contest as a hopeless one," but still feared that the Democrats could control the convention; if so, "Kansas may be a Slave State after all. . . . It is Estimated that there are five hundred slaves in the territory today by virtue of the Dred Scott decision. A family recently came to this place from Kentucky with five."

Keywords: Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Democratic Party (U.S.); Dred Scott decision; Election, Wyandotte Constitution delegates to convention, June 1859; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Osawatomie convention; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Slaves in Kansas Territory


Letter, C. G. Allen to Redpath and Hinton
Authors: Allen, C. G.
Date: December 1859
Allen, a "minister of the Gospel" at Cottonwood Falls, K.T., wrote in response to the Redpath/Hinton call for "anecdotes & reminiscences" concerning "the brave & philanthropic [John] Brown," who the preacher first met in Lawrence in 1856. Allen left Lawrence when a call came for volunteers to aid in the defense of Osawatomie in August of that year and while there engaged saw his first "Border Ruffians," who he described as "miserable specimens of humanity. They were ragged & dirty. Their cloths & faces were to a considerable extent covered with tobacco spit." Allen and the men he was with actually missed the Battle of Osawatomie by moving south before the attack in an effort to find the attackers before they reached the town.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Child, Lydia Maria Francis, 1802-1880; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Free state settlers; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Osawatomie, Battle of; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sharps rifles; Stanton, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. Robinson to "Dear Madam" [Emma Willard]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to Willard's letter of March 22, Robinson wrote from Quindaro that he was "gratified" to learn of her interest in Kansas history and that she was "disposed to examine for yourself the random thrusts of the press." Robinson went on to make some interesting observations regarding his interpretation of Kansas events and the importance of the various factions, free state and proslavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Kansas question; Law and Order Party; Lecompton Constitution; Millard, Emma; Proslavery; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Political Anti-Slavery Convention
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 29, 1860
This announcement called for a political anti-slavery convention to be held in Boston on May 29, 1860. The men who called the convention, who were listed at the end of the announcement, believed that neither of the current political parties truly represented their anti-slavery sentiments. They stated their goal in terms of liberty for all people, both black and white.

Keywords: African Americans; Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Political conventions; Proslavery supporters; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Slave power; Slavery; Slaves; United States Government; United States. Constitution


Battle of Indianola from Autobiography, volume 1
Authors: Reader, Samuel James
Date: 1906
The section of Samuel Reader's autobiography deals with the Battle of Indianola, which occurred on August 30, 1856. The autobiography is based on notes from his diary for the same period. The reminiscence describes events near Indianola, Shawnee Co. when the local militia gathered to prevent theft and burning by pro slavery supporters but no fighting actually occurred.

Keywords: Free state militia; Indianola, Battle of; Indianola, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Reader, Samuel James; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory


Photograph, Colonel Albert Gallatin Boone
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Albert G. Boone was a resident of Westport, Missouri and was a pro-slavery supporter. He served as U. S. Indian Agent for the Cheyenne, Arapahoe, Kiowa, Comanche and Plains Apache tribes from 1859 through 1861. He was a grandson of Daniel Boone.

Keywords: Boone, Albert G.; Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery supporters; Westport, Missouri


Photograph, David Rice Atchison
Authors: Whitehurst, Jessie H.
Date: 1850
David Rice Atchison was a proslavery leader from Missouri. He represented that state in the U.S. Senate from 1843 to 1855. He was involved in various aspects of the territorial conflict, allegedly riding with the raiders who sacked Lawrence in 1856. The town of Atchison and Atchison County were named for him.

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Daguerreotypes; Missouri; Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery supporters; Whitehurst, Jessie H.


Photograph, John Henry Stringfellow
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
John Henry Stringfellow was a resident of Atchison and a proslavery supporter. He was in charge of some of the territorial troops that were mentioned in the Strickler report on damages from altercations in Kansas Territory. He held several elective positions including Speaker of the House in the 1855 territorial legislature.

Keywords: Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Card photographs; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Militia; Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Stringfellow, John H.


Illustration, Battle of Hickory Point
Authors: Breyman, W.
Date: undated, ca. 1856
This illustration was based on the eye-witness experience of W. Breyman. The Battle of Hickory Point took place 5 miles east of Ozawkie, in Jefferson County. Pro-slavery forces surrendered to Free state forces, led by James Harvey, only six hours after they were first attacked. However, Harvey's 101 men were later captured and charged with murder in the first degree; about twenty of those men were convicted and sentenced to five years in the Penitentiary.

Keywords: Battles; Bickerton, Thomas; Breyman, W.; Free state militia; Harvey, James A.; Hickory Point, Battle of; Illustrations; Militia; Proslavery supporters


Photograph, Lucian Eastin
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Lucian Eastin was a proslavery supporter. He was the head of the proslavery militia and the editor of the Herald in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory for a period of time. This image is a copy from a painting.

Keywords: Eastin, Lucian J.; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Militia; Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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