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16 results for Proslavery settlers:
Members and Officers, First Legislative Assembly of Kansas Territory
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 2, 1855
This catalogue lists members and officers of the council and both houses of the first legislative assembly in Kansas Territory. It includes demographic information including how long each settler was in the territory, their political affiliations (most were pro slavery), and other remarks.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Proslavery settlers


Copy of letter, S. L. Adair to Mrs. H. L. Hibbard
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: August 14, 1856
Adair, writing from Osawatomie, reported on conditions in Kansas. Mrs. Hibbard was the president of the Woman's Kansas Aid and Liberty Association of Chicago, Illinois. He reported that many recent emigrants were ill and others were using up their reserves to help others, hoping they would be repaid by aid received in Kansas. He also reported that a group of Georgians camped near Osawatomie and ran off more than 18 horses. Some free state men were prepared to confront them but they left the area. Adair wrote of rumors that a large force was coming to burn Osawatomie.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Chicago, Illinois; Emigration and immigration; Free state perspective; Hibbard, Mrs. H. L.; Illness; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Migration, internal; Osawatomie, Battle of; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Proslavery settlers; Women


Settlers on the Marais des Cygnes River
Authors: Stewart, John E.
Date: c. 1856 or 1857
This document, presumably compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, lists the pro-slavery and free state settlers who resided on the Marais des Cygnes River in Kansas Territory. The author also included a listing of where the free-state settlers lived before coming to Kansas.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Illinois; Indiana; Kentucky; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes River; Missouri; Ohio; Pennsylvania; Proslavery settlers; Settlement


Settlers on Little Sugar Creek
Authors: Stewart, John E.
Date: c. 1856 or 1857
This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border ruffians; Churches; Free state settlers; Illinois; Indiana; Iowa; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Missouri; Ohio; Proslavery settlers; Schools; Settlement; Timber; Titus, Henry Theodore; Violence; Westport, Missouri


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to My Dear Cleaveland
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: January 4, 1857
This rather inspiring letter, written by Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling in Kansas, demonstrates Hyatt's commitment to the National Kansas Committee and his passion for the free state cause. Apparently there was some sort of conflict within the committee that threatened its ability to function, but nevertheless Hyatt was determined to aid the struggling free state settlers in Kansas. He spoke in great detail about some of his travels around the territory, including the inclement weather and his perspective on the pro-slavery and free state settlers that he encountered during his stay.

Keywords: Bickerton, Thomas; Food; Free state cause; Free state settlers; Horses; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas Central Committee; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes River; National Kansas Committee; Proslavery settlers; Relief; Settlement; Weather


Letter, Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles
Authors: Mendenhall, Richard
Date: January 19, 1857
Richard Mendenhall was a missionary at the Shawnee Friends Mission in the 1840s. He returned to Indiana for a time but moved back to Kansas Territory in the fall of 1855. He was in Kansas during the territorial era and wrote Wattles describing an attact on the Friends Mission on August 20, 1856 by proslavery forces. He indicated that they were told to leave or the mission would be burned. However, Mendenhall wrote that David Atchison and other proslavery supporters asked that the Friends be left out of the violence. Mendenhall also described an attempt to form a settlement by men from Georgia about 3 miles from Osawatomie. He wrote that they were friendly at first but they later committed depredations. In response, about 100 free state men ran them off, took $500 in clothing and provisions, and burned a fort they had built. Mendenhall believed that the Battle of Osawatomie was a response to this.

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Free state support; Friends Mission, Lykins County; Georgia; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Mendenhall, Richard; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Missionaries; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Proslavery settlers; Society of Friends; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear Brother"
Authors: Anderson, J. G.
Date: August 23, 1857
Writing to his brother from Barnesville (Bourbon County) on August 28, 1857, Jeremiah Goldsmith Anderson, a native of Indiana and follower of James Montgomery in southeast Kansas, described a variety of mundane matters regarding conditions in Kansas, including land claims and the construction of a steam sawmill on the river.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; County seats; Crops; Farmers; Free state settlers; Missouri; Proslavery settlers; Sawmills; Sickness (see Illness); Timber claim


Summary Report of the number of residents
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
This document summarizes the results from a number of other documents that recorded the number of free state and proslavery settlers in various areas of Kansas Territory. It records 118 free state men and 94 proslavery men. It also cites the number of free state families in need of assistance and the number of good claims still available. The author acknowledges that these numbers are close, but not completely accurate.

Keywords: Big Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Land claims; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers


Residents on the Little Osage
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
This brief report describes the settlers along the Little Osage River, stating that it is occupied mostly by proslavery settlers; there are only three or four free state residents. The report mentions Enoch Osbourne (presumably a free state settler) who was driven from his land, and also notes that there is a need for free state men on this creek.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Free state settlers; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers


Residents on the Marais des Cygnes, commencing at the state line
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
This report provides a listing of the total number of residents along the Marais des Cygnes River, including free state residents, proslavery residents, and free state residents "in distress." It also contains brief accounts of specific individuals and information about the surrounding area, such as the availability of land claims.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Marais des Cygnes River; Proslavery settlers


Residents on Lost Creek, a tributary of the Little Osage
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
This document lists the names and origins of the proslavery and free state settlers that lived along Lost Creek, on the north edge of Bourbon County. The first page details information about specific families in the area and states that Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, made arrangements to aid those settlers who are listed as being "in distress."

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Lost Creek, Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers


Residents on Big Sugar Creek
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: c. 1857
This account contains the names and origins of both free state and pro slavery settlers that lived on Big Sugar Creek. The document begins with a brief description of the area and mentions particular cases of settlers who had noteworthy experiences. Of the 25 pro slavery residents, two owned slaves. It was presumably collected by Thaddeus Hyatt or some other member of the National Kansas Committee.

Keywords: African Americans; Big Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers; Slaves


Residents on Marmiton Creek
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
This document lists the names and origins of the residents of Marmiton (Marmaton) Creek, including whether each settler was free state, pro slavery, or noncommittal. The first page lists the total number of settlers and also includes a brief description of the area.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state settlers; Marmaton, Kansas Territory; Marmiton Creek; Proslavery settlers


Letter, William Hutchinson to "Dear Helen"
Authors: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904
Date: January 3, 1859
A resident of Lawrence and correspondent from the New York Tribune, William Hutchinson wrote his wife Helen from Mapleton, northern Bourbon County, right after the first of the year, 1859, to tell her about "the wars" in the southern part of the territory and about the activities of "Old" John Brown and his followers. Hutchinson met with the "war council," as well as with James Montgomery, advised against "rash measures," and, with Montgomery, participated in a large meeting of the citizens "to devise a plan for peace." (A note on the back of page 4, by R.J. Hinton, reads, "Copied by my wife from original. Interesting." A good number of the documents in this folder are copies--mostly handwritten.)

Keywords: Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamilton, Charles A.; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Missouri; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Paola, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers; Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, E. N. [Ephraim Nute] to Unidentified recipient
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: February 24, 1859
Ephaim Nute of Lawrence provides an interesting description of the plight of one of the Doy party's fugitive slaves, captured and jailed at Platte City until his escape and dangerous flight back to Lawrence. "We have him now hid & are to day making arrangements to have him set forward tomorrow 30 miles to another depot. I think they (there are 2 others to go) will not be taken again without bloodshed." Nute also mentioned his involvement in the "Charley Fisher affair in Leavenworth." Fisher, a black fugitive, had actually come to Nute's house "disguised in female attire."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Canada; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, John; Fisher, Charley; Free state cause; Fugitive slaves; Jefferson County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Nute, Ephraim; Platte City, Missouri; Proslavery settlers; Underground railroad


Letter, James Hanway to R. J. Hinton
Authors: Hanway, James
Date: December 5, 1859
In response to the Redpath/Hinton notice in the Lawrence Republican, Hanway wrote from his home in Shermansville, Franklin County, to share his story about "our friend John Brown," and he hoped their efforts would convey to all Brown's "the character" and "motives" and "place him in his true light before the world." Hanway highlights the attempted "rescue of Lawrence" in May 1856; the subsequent "'Tragedy'" on Pottawatomie Creek, about which Brown personal told Hanaway, "it was a just act, to take the lives of those 5 pro-slave ruffians"; how John Brown was a surveyor who used his profession to gather intellegence among proslavery settlers; the fact, according to Hanway, that the Doyles and others were actively engaged in efforts to run free state settlers out of the area; and specifically denies the story that Frederick Brown was "insane."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Hanway, James; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery settlers; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shermansville, Kansas Territory; Slave power; Surveyors


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.