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17 results for Proslavery perspective:
Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 7, 1855
Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts en route to Kansas City and ultimately to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, wrote from Richmond, Missouri to his brother. He relayed the murder of an unnamed free state man (likely Charles W. Dow), the gathering of 1,100 free state and 800 proslavery men at Lawrence, and other Wakarusa War events. Hill, a free state supporter, felt that the information he received from Missourians was inaccurate or exaggerated. He doubted reports that 60 proslavery men had been killed at Lawrence, or of abolitionists driving proslavery settlers from their homes. Hill reported the arrests of free state men including Judge Johnson and General Pomeroy, who he heard had escaped.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Cannons; Dow, Charles W.; Free state perspective; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery perspective; Sharps rifles; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 8, 1855 - December 9, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Westport, Missouri to his wife as he received new information concerning the Wakarusa War at Lawrence. Hill was frustrated by these reports, which conflicted and were from the proslavery perspective, and which concerned the number of free state and proslavery soldiers, the status of the war, and government action taken to prevent conflict. Hill was also troubled by shameless "traveling and drinking and swearing" and gunshots on the Sabbath. The last page of the letter expresses his relief at news of peace in Lawrence, where he would learn "the other syde of the story" upon arrival. The murder of Thomas W. Barber, who rode outside Lawrence and was shot by a proslavery supporter on December 6th, was mentioned. Hill also described an eventful stagecoach journey.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Cannons; Daily life; Free state militia; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery perspective; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Stagecoaches; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, H Hill to [Brother]
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 9, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Weston, Massachusetts to his brother, describing his stagecoach journey from Richmond. Although 47 miles from Lawrence, he had not received a trustworthy update concerning the Wakarusa War. Hill mentioned Thomas W. Barber's murder, numbers of men and weapons involved in the war, and his plans to briefly visit Lawrence. He vowed never to travel to Kansas Territory in winter again. Hill also showed concern for Russell, who tended his cattle in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Free state militia; Hill, Hiram; Proslavery perspective; Stagecoaches; Travel; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Weather


Letter, S. C. P. [Samuel Clarke Pomeroy] to Dr. [Thomas H.] Webb
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: December 19, 1855
Samuel Pomeroy, writing from Boonville, Missouri, to Dr. Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, described a dinner he attended in Lexington, Missouri with pro-slavery Missourians who had participated in the Wakarusa War. Pomeroy expressed the opinion that the Missourians drank too much alcohol but he reported that he had been allowed to express his anti-slavery views to the group. Pomeroy indicated that the Missourians were particularly upset with Governor Wilson Shannon's intervention in the Wakarusa War.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Missouri; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery perspective; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, H. J. Strickler to [Thomas N.] Stinson
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: September 2, 1856
Hiram Jackson Strickler, adjutant general of Kansas Territory, writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, briefly described for Thomas N. Stinson the Battle of Osawatomie that took place on August 30, 1856. In the battle, pro-slavery forces led by John W. Reed defeated free state forces led by John Brown. Brown's son Frederick was killed in the engagement. Strickler's comments indicated that he held a pro-slavery perspective.

Keywords: Battles; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Battle of; Proslavery perspective; Reed, John W.; Stinson, Thomas N.; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Town companies


Complaint about seizure of Briscoe Davis's house and family in Linn County
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: November 18, 1856
According to an explanation written by Edward Hoogland on the outside of the document, Briscoe Davis' sister (unnamed) wrote this complaint describing the October 24, 1856 looting of Mr. Davis' house in Linn County by free state supporters led by a Captain Holmes (likely James R. Holmes, a Free State Militia captain). The seizure of Davis' home took place shortly after Governor John Geary's October 1856 visit to southeastern Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Davis, Briscoe; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Holmes, James H.; Hoogland, Edward; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Proslavery perspective; Violence


Pro-slavery man's musket
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Flintlock musket carried by J. H. Meyer in 1856, while a member of the pro-slavery Kansas Terriorial Militia.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Firearms; Guns; Meyer, J. H.; Militia; Objects; Proslavery activities; Proslavery perspective; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, A. Pierse to Dear Sir [Eli Thayer]
Authors: Pierse, A.
Date: March 31, 1857
A. Pierse wrote from Washington, D.C. to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pierse was born in North Carolina and lived most of his life in the South but had been living in Minnesota Territory for the past seven years. He told Thayer that he planned to move to Kansas in the spring of 1857. Pierse offered Thayer his opinion on what free state supporters should do in Kansas Territory. He informed Thayer that, although he had "Southern opinions on the subject of slavery" and believed the federal government had no right to prohibit slavery in the territories, he was "without prejudice for or against either side" in the debate over slavery in Kansas Territory. Pierse suggested that the best course for free staters to take would be to accept the Dred Scott decision, actively participate in the political process in Kansas Territory, and work for the admission of Kansas as a state with or without slavery. Once Kansas was admitted, he contended, free state supporters would be on firmer legal ground to advocate for the prohibition of slavery, since it was generally accepted that "the people have the power to prohibit slavery in their state." He concluded by stating that once Kansas was a state, free staters could make the case that property would be worth 3 or 4 times more if slavery was prohibited in the state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Dred Scott decision; Free state prospects; Pierse, A.; Proslavery perspective; Slavery; Southern emigrants; Southerners; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Letter, J. Thompson to My Dear [James W.] Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: January 29, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to James W. Denver from the U. S. Department of the Interior regarding the current debate over the Lecompton Constitution. Thompson advised Denver to stand his ground in support of it, regardless of what the President might say; "to turn aside now is downright weakness" and a show of cowardice. Thompson's opinion was that a Territorial decision to abolish slavery would be against the Dred Scott decision, and therefore unconstitutional.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; Dred Scott decision; Elmore, Rush; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Proslavery perspective; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, J. Williams to Governor [James W.] Denver
Authors: Williams, J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Williams, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, complained about the activities of James Montgomery and "his murderers & robbers" in Bourbon County. Williams, who displayed moderate views, condemned both proslavery and free state violence and maintained that the citizens of Bourbon County simply wanted to live in peace.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Griffith, William Riley; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Violence; Williams, J.


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to General [James W. Denver]
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: May 16, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported that conditions were peaceful in the southeast section of the territory. Smith stated that he had accompanied a group of dragoons on an unsuccessful mission to find and arrest James Montgomery and other free state supporters who allegedly had engaged in violent activities in the area. Smith commented that in his view the "ultra Pro Slavery party" was partly responsible for the unrest in southeast Kansas Territory, but he also believed that "moderate free state" supporters should act to stop the violence.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; Smith, H. P. A.; United States. Army; Violence


Letter, Geo. W. Clarke to Saml. J. Jones
Authors: Clarke, George W.
Date: June 2, 1858
George W. Clarke, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Samuel J. Jones (Sheriff Jones), described a May 30, 1858 incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declared that he was innocent of the charges and viewed Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also described the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamelton, Charles A.; Jayhawkers; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; United States. Army; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to Jas. W. Denver
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: June 3, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on events of May 30, 1858 involving Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker's attempt to arrest George W. Clarke on charges that Clarke participated in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Smith questioned Walker's authority to arrest Clarke, observing that Walker's arrest warrant had been issued by a justice of the peace from a township, Mapleton, that did not yet exist. Smith commented on the general state of unrest in the area and declared that the "County is in fact in open rebellion . . . . complete anarchy prevails." He encouraged Governor Denver to come to Fort Scott to assess the situation for himself and to help restore order.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Smith, H. P. A.; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to Lewis Cass, Secretary of State
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: November 19, 1858
Acting Governor Hugh S. Walsh wrote from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to Secretary of State Lewis Cass. Walsh requested permission to use $3000 remaining from funds appropriated for the August 1858 election as a means to offer rewards for the capture of James Montgomery, John Brown, and other Free State supporters allegedly engaged in violence in southeastern Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cass, Lewis, 1782-1866; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Violence; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


The Issue Fairly Presented: The Senate Bill for the Admission of Kansas as a State
Authors: Democratic National Committee
Date: ca. 1858
This pamplet, voicing the opinions of the Democratic National Committee, charged Black Republicans with inciting violence by their opposition to Kansas' admission to the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. As abolitionists, their "fanatical organization" purposely prolonged the conflict by promoting chaotic Territorial politics via their support of the Topeka movement. The document pointed out the role of emigrant aid societies in settling Kansas, blaming them as a source of conflict since Nebraska had had no aid sociey assistance and was not experiencing violence. Also included in the pamphlet was a summary of a debate in which Michigan's settlement and admission to the Union was compared to the current situation in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Black Republicans; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state government; Michigan; Proslavery perspective; Territorial government; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Letter, Paul Shepherd to James Redpath
Authors: Shepherd, Paul
Date: January 3, 1860
From Dover, Michigan, Paul Shepherd--formerly of Kansas Territory--wrote Redpath to pass along "some useful information, in repect to John H. Kagi." Of most interest, perhaps is Shepherd's account of the "shoot out" at Tecumseh between Kagi and Judge Rush Elmore, who Kagi had accused of "being a prime mover in the murderous attack upon him" at Lecompton in mid-January 1857.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Border ruffians; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Elmore, Rush; Free state cause; Free state militia; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Kagi, John Henry; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Moffett, Charles; National Era; Newspapers - Free State; Proslavery perspective; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature); Topeka boys; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Violence


Letter, Thos. R. Bayne to Miss Zoe Adams
Authors: Bayne, Thomas R.
Date: September 11, 1895
Mr. Bayne wrote from Williamstown, Kansas describing slaves that he had owned. He also listed a number of other families who owned slaves in Kansas during the territorial period in southern Jefferson and northern Douglas counties. He offered a southerners perspective on owning slaves. This item is from information collected by F. G. Adams and Miss Zu Adams in 1895. They contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society.

Keywords: African Americans; Bayne, Thomas R.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Elmore, Rush; Jefferson County, Kansas Territory; Proslavery perspective; Skaggs, James; Skaggs, Thomas; Slaveholders; Slavery; Slaves; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Wallis, John


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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