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33 results for Prisoners:
Letter, Sarah [presumably Sarah T. D. Lawrence] to My Dear Mrs. [William B.] Stowe
Authors: Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: January 9 1851
This letter, written by Sarah [presumably would be Sarah T.D. Lawrence, Charles Robinson's future wife] from Belchertown, MA, to Mrs. William B. Stowe, in West Brookfield, MA, contains excerpts of a letter written by Charles Robinson to Sarah. Robinson described his conditions of imprisonment in California (where he had traveled prior to settling in Kansas); he had been jailed for supporting squatter's rights and anti-slavery causes. He makes reference to a Dr. J.G. Holland, who had been a friend and colleague of his at home in Massachusetts.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; California; Massachusetts; National politics; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Squatter sovereignty


George Washington Brown to Mr. Fowler
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: May 13, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. Written from Kansas City, Missouri, to a friend on the day before his arrest, Brown expressed concern that his life could be in danger. He enclosed an outline for a "Documentary History of Kansas" and asked Fowler to publish a book based on the outline.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Free state cause; Herald of Freedom; Journalism; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Newspapers; Prisoners; Treason


Letter, George Washington Brown to his mother
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: May 13, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. Writing to his mother on the day before his arrest, Brown expressed concern that his life could be in danger. He instructed his mother to use his estate to provide support for the Herald of Freedom.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Free state cause; Herald of Freedom; Journalism; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Newspapers; Prisoners


Letter, C. Robinson to My Dear S. [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 29, 1856
Charles Robinson wrote to his wife, Sara Robinson, his first letter during his detention, which would last until Sept 10, 1856. He reported to her that so far he had been treated like a gentleman, and that his quarters were comfortable and would also accommodate her, if she would like to join him. Robinson also expressed regret at the destruction of their home during the sack of Lawrence.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Treason


Photograph, Charles Robinson and Deputy
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 1856
Portrait of Charles Robinson, free state leader, under arrest by a Deputy, in May 1856. Robinson was arrested in Lexington, Missouri, with his wife, Sarah, as they traveled East. He was taken to Westport, the proslavery camp near Lawrence, back to Kansas City, to Leavenworth, and then to Lecompton. Robinson was arrested on charges of treason, and was held prisoner four months before being released on bail.

Keywords: Free state activities; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, G. W. Brown to Eli Thayer, Esq.
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: June 4, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Free state perspective; Herald of Freedom; Journalism; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Press; Prisoners; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Slave power; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Treason


Letter, H. H. Williams and others, to Rev. Sir [Samuel Adair]
Authors: Williams, Henry H.
Date: June 14, 1856
H. H. Williams wrote from Tecumseh, where he was imprisoned along with seven other suspects in the Pottawatomie massacre, informing Rev. Samuel Adair of their situation. The letter is also signed by the seven other prisoners--William Partridge, Jason Brown, S. W. Kilbourne, John Brown Jr., S. B. Morse, Jacob Benjamin, and P. D. Maness. He indicated that they were charged with high treason. He also reported on John Brown, Jr.'s health. Williams asked Adair to try to raise some funds for their legal defense as they had hired a lawyer.

Keywords: Benjamin, Jacob; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, Jr.; Kilbourne, S. W.; Maness, P. D.; Massacres; Morse, S. B.; Partridge, William; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Prisoners; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Treason; Williams, Henry H.


George Washington Brown, Near Lecompton, KT to I.B. Donaldson
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: July 9, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. Brown wrote to Israel B. Donaldson, the U.S. Marshal in Kansas, requesting that he terminate and settle a contract with his wife, Mrs. Lois Brown, for boarding the prisoners. Brown asked to board with fellow prisoners John Brown, Jr. and Henry H. Williams and sought to distance himself from Charles Robinson and his followers.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Mrs. George Washington; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Herald of Freedom; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States marshals; Williams, Henry H.


Letter, C. Robinson, Camp Sacket, to Hon. J. C. Fremont
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: July 28, 1856
While a prisoner at Camp Sackett near Lecompton, Robinson informed Fremont that James Emery was traveling east and should be used in Fremont's presidential campaign as a stump speaker as he "can do good service to the cause." Robinson also indicated that he did not know if the Pierce administration had decided whether or not to hang Robinson and his fellow prisoners.

Keywords: Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Emery, James Stanley; Free state cause; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Prisons; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, [John Brown, Jr.] to [John Brown]
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: August 14, 1856
Although this document is unsigned, it is almost certainly a letter from John Brown, Jr., to his father. The former was at a "camp" near Lecompton, still in the custody of territorial officials, and he wanted his father to come for a visit. John, Jr. provides instructions on how this might be done safely; he believed it could be, but warned, "don't let them get you."

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Free state cause; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners


Letter, [John Brown, Jr.?] to [John Brown?]
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: August 16, 1856
Two days after encouraging his father to visit him at the prisoners' "camp" near Lecompton, John Brown, Jr., wrote to say "I had not better try to meet you just now." He thought things looked "favorable" for the free state prisoners and wrote of what he had heard of the Battle of Fort Titus, which took place that very day, August 16, 1856.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state cause; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Sackett, Delos B.; Titus, Henry Theodore


Pamphlet, "A Ride Through Kanzas"
Authors: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Date: 1856
These "letters", function as diary entries and were published collectively under the above title, written by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, an ardent Northern abolitionist and agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. Higginson describes his travels through Kansas in the aftermath of the Battle of Hickory Point and includes accounts of the experience of free state prisoners held in Lecompton, as well as those of various citizens of the territory, free state and proslavery alike. He concludes his entries with an assessment of the future in Kanzas, stating that "the more thorough an Abolitionist any man is, the more correct are his prophecies as to American affairs".

Keywords: American Anti-Slavery Society; Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hickory Point, Battle of; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas Territory; Landscape; Law and Order Party; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Prisoners; Travel


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 29, 1856
Again from Lawrence, Charles Robinson wrote to his wife was traveling east via Chicago. After kidding her about how well-known she was becoming, he commented unfavorably on Governor John W. Geary, who "thinks he is awful smart & is getting rediculous fast." Robinson also mentioned the forthcoming legislative election (October 6, 1856)--"We shall not vote."

Keywords: Elections; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara Tappan Doolittle (see Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911)


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Madam [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 3? 1856
Amos A. Lawrence, in Boston, wrote to Sara Robinson regarding her husband's desire to retire from the Emigrant Aid Company, advising her that he not do so until after the November presidential elections. Lawrence also suggested to her that, when writing to President Pierce, she might call him "President" and not "Mister", in order to further her cause. He admitted to Mrs. Robinson, though, that he "has no more love for him" than she does.

Keywords: Davis, Jefferson; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Page from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: October 4, 1856
This front page of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper is half-filled with an illustration of the "Free State Prisoners": George W. Brown, John Brown, Jr., Judge G.W. Smith, Charles Robinson, Gaius Jenkins, Henry Williams, and George Deitzler, at their camp near Lecompton, Kansas Territory. All had been arrested during the past May, either for charges of treason or for bearing arms against the Government.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Brown, John, Jr.; Deitzler, George W.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Illustrations; Jenkins, Gaius; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Williams, Henry H.


Receipt, Kansas State Central Committee
Authors: Colburn, Willard
Date: October 22, 1856
In light of the receipts that precede this one, dated Lawrence, October 22, 1856, it might be assumed that the provisions and clothing listed here were intended for the Lecompton prisoners. The list was signed by Willard Colburn and included shirts, pants, quilts, etc.

Keywords: Free state support; Kansas State Central Committee; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Receipts


Letter, M. C. Dickey to Mr. [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Dickey, Milton C.
Date: October 23, 1856
This letter to Thaddeus Hyatt of the National Kansas Committee, written by Milton Dickey from Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, informed Hyatt of Dickey's journey west. The author described the hardships endured by Kansas settlers, as well as the enthralling tale of a free state man who escaped from the prison at Lecompton.

Keywords: Cannons; Dickey, Milton C.; Donalson, Israel B.; Emigration and immigration; Firearms; Free state perspective; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; Prisoners; Prisons; Relief; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Sharps rifles; Slavery; United States. Army


Letter, R. J. Hinton to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Hinton, R. J.
Date: November 6, 1856
This letter from R. J. Hinton was written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory and was addressed to Rev. Higginson, a radical abolitionist and agent of the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. The letter is filled with information about the struggle for Kansas. Hinton mentioned the trials of the free state prisoners at Lecompton and Governor Geary's order to arrest other free state figures. Colonel Titus was also threatening to help the U. S. troops arrest free state men. Apparently a Captain Homes [sic] from New York had become so frustrated that he had collected several followers and was determined to administer his own brand of justice. Hinton did not completely approve of such action, claiming that while it was understandable, it was "not generally beneficial to our cause." Hinton had experienced some personal troubles as well, when some thieves who claimed to be free state men carried off the belongings of his company, settled at Lexington. The letter concluded with updates about the various men in his company.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Dunning, John; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Proslavery activities; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Titus, Henry Theodore; United States. Army; White, Martin


Names of prisoners in custody at Lecompton
Authors: Hoogland, Edward
Date: November 12, 1856
A list of free state prisoners in custody at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Most of the prisoners had been captured at the Battle of Hickory Point on September 13, 1856. The list records each prisoner's name, previous state of residence, and reason for imprisonment. The last page of the document lists prisoners who had been released. The list was prepared by Edward Hoogland by order of Governor John Geary.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Hickory Point, Battle of; Hoogland, Edward; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners


Letter, Samuel C. Smith to Dear Friend [Rev. T. W. Higginson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: November 26, 1856
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory by Samuel Smith, was addressed to Rev. T. W. Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts. The letter began with several small matters regarding aid for Kansas, and then turned quickly to the most recent events in the struggle between proslavery and free state forces. Apparently, thirty two of the free state prisoners held by U. S. troops at Tecumseh had managed to escape, and Smith rather sarcastically commented that the troops had done a favor to "Uncle Sam" by relieving the government of the cost of supporting all those prisoners. The author also spoke of [Thaddeus] Hyatt's presence in the territory, and of George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom. He also informed Higginson that Col. Eldridge and Thomas Eldridge have had complaints filed against them, stating that "nature never designed them for distributions of charity." The letter concludes with information regarding land sales in Leavenworth, and the founding of a new city, Quindaro. In general, Smith's writing style is quite humorous, as well as informative.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Donalson, Israel B.; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Eldridge, Thomas B.; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas Central Committee; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Relief; Smith, Samuel C.; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Titus, Henry Theodore; Town development; United States. Army; Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, Caleb S. Pratt to My Dear Sir [Rev. T. W. Higginson]
Authors: Pratt, Caleb S.
Date: December 1, 1856
This letter was written by Caleb Pratt from Lawrence, Kansas, to Thomas W. Higginson in Worcester, Massachusetts. He thanked Higginson for the revolvers that he had furnished for Pratt's artillery company; Pratt truly appreciated "the high minded reflecting men of the north." Pratt also spoke of the uneasy peace, stating that the free state population were still prepared to fiercely resist any encroachment on their liberty, although they were at times discouraged and war-weary. He also mentioned the election of President Buchanan less than a month before. Pratt informed Higginson of the escape of the free state prisoners from Tecumseh, although he was sure that Higginson was already aware of the incident. Apparently, Pratt had hoped to help with their escape, but he was too late. Other prisoners had also effected an escape from the Lecompton prison.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state militia; Free state perspective; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Pratt, Caleb S.; Prisoners; Stubbs militia company; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Titus, Henry Theodore


Testimony of S. P. Hand
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: December 2, 1856
This testimony, a part of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was apparently collected by the president of the National Kansas Committee, Thaddeus Hyatt. It relates the tale of S. P. Hand, a soldier in the free state militia who took part in the battle of Fort Titus and was captured at the battle of Hickory Point. His account provides a great deal of information regarding troop movements and the workings of the free state militia.

Keywords: Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Central Relief Committee; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Fort Saunders, Kansas Territory (see also Camp Saunders); Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state militia; Hand, S. P.; Harvey, James A.; Hickory Point, Battle of; Hoyt, David Starr; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Shombre, Henry J.; Skirmishing; Titus, Henry Theodore


Testimonies of Nathaniel Parker, Horace L. Dunnell, Hinton S. Dunnell, Alexander MacArthur, James Hall, Jerome Hazen, and Charles Henry Caulkins
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: December 5, 1856 - December 7, 1856
These testimonies, presumably taken down on paper by Thaddeus Hyatt of the National Kansas Committee, include personal information about each settler, such as their age, occupation, etc., as well as their experiences in Kansas and their involvement in border warfare and skirmishes with pro-slavery settlers. Each account is descriptive and provides tremendous detail about their individual experiences. The testimonies of MacArthur, Hall, and Hazen are combined into one, with this group testimony split into two separate sections.

Keywords: Battles; Black Jack, Battle of; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Caulkins, Charles Henry; Cutter, Calvin M.; Dunnell, Hinton S.; Dunnell, Horace L.; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Guns; Hall, James; Harvey, James A.; Hazen, Jerome; Hickory Point, Battle of; Hoyt, David Starr; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Iowa; Iowa City, Iowa; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; MacArthur, Alexander; Missouri River; Parker, Nathaniel; Prisoners; Prisons; Proslavery activities; Skirmishing; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas; Weapons (see also Guns); Weston, Missouri; Wounds and injuries


Experiences of R. S. Griffithe, N. W. Spicer, and J. A. Harvey
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 6, 1856
These testimonies, collected by the National Kansas Committee, record the experiences of these three settlers during the turbulent times of Bleeding Kansas. These testimonies focus on each settler's involvement in free state activities and their interaction with border ruffians. Griffithe and Spicer both served in the free state militia, and Harvey, who had commanded an emigrant train from Chicago, was the commander of a free state company.

Keywords: Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Fort Saunders, Kansas Territory (see also Camp Saunders); Free state activities; Free state militia; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Griffithe, R. S.; Harvey, James A.; Hickory Point, Battle of; Hoyt, David Starr; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shombre, Henry J.; Skirmishing; Spicer, N.W.; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Titus, Henry Theodore; Topeka, Kansas; Violence


Letter, E. L. [Mrs. William] Partridge to Mr. [Samuel] Adair
Authors: Partridge, E. L. (Mrs. William)
Date: December 28, 1856
Mrs. William Partridge reported on the condition of her husband while a prisoner at Tecumseh. Mr. Partridge was one of the free state men arrested after the Pottawatomie massacre. She described his health and his prospects for being released.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Massacres; Partridge, E. L (Mrs. William); Partridge, William; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Prisoners; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory


Account of the Battle of Osawatomie
Authors: Brown, Spencer Kellogg
Date: c. 1856
This account of the battle and its aftermath, written by Spencer Kellogg Brown, was compiled from his shorthand diary. It describes the battle and his experiences as a young teenager taken prisoner by pro-slavery forces. He traveled with the Missouri troops and their other prisoners, and then for several weeks he lived under house arrest with Dr. James Keith from Lexington, Missouri. This particular account is unique because it gives very detailed descriptions of how ordinary citizens became entangled in the fighting.

Keywords: Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Spencer; Garrison, David R.; Keith, James; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Missourians; Osawatomie, Battle of; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Sears, W. A.; Westport, Missouri; White, Martin


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to Dear Governor [James Denver]
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: October 28, 1858
Hugh S. Walsh, Acting Governor of Kansas Territory, wrote to former Governor James Denver regarding recent political events. The first part relates incidents arising from the mishandling of prisoners by Marshals Robbins and Walker, who had arrested and imprisoned them, leaving them "without a bailiff or any charge whatever." The second part discusses political strategies for appeasing some free state party members in order to win their support. Among those, Walsh proposes that a Kentuckian man become the next governor and that during the Democratic Convention of November 25 they adopt the Cincinnati Platform, which would uphold popular sovereignty in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Cincinnati Platform; Coffey County, Kansas Territory; Davis, Alson C.; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Elmore, Rush; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sykes, T.B.; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, John N. Gardner to Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Gardner, John N.
Date: January 9, 1859
This letter, written from Buffalo by John N. Gardner, is addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Mr. Gardner related the tale of Mrs. H.G. Hyzen of Waitsfield, Vermont, an ardent supporter of John Brown who claimed to have a clairvoyant vision of him in his prison cell. The entire letter is a passionate piece of correspondence, speaking frequently of liberty and the "Total Annihilation of that Scourge of Humanity, Human Slavery." The letter also mentioned other abolitionists--Henry C. Wright and Mrs. Child--who wrote letters to John Brown.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Charles Town, Virginia; Gardner, John N.; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Prisoners; Prisons; Slavery; Vermont; Waitsfield, Vermont


Letter, Frank Walker to his family, presumably.
Authors: Walker, Frank
Date: March 24, 1859
Walker wrote from Mound City, Linn County, Kansas Territory. He indicated that he was working for $25 per month. He intended to preempt a claim the next fall but was going to plant corn on 18 acres. Part of the letter referred to some type of imprisonment but the details were not clear.

Keywords: Agriculture; Border disputes and warfare; Land claims; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Walker, Frank


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
J. N. O. P. (Dr. John P.) Wood filed claim #321 for costs resulting from boarding prisoners in Lecompton during 1856. His itemized claim also included various property and animals that were taken from him also during 1856. This is one of the few claims filed for costs that fell into the "public" class. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Clothing and dress; Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Food; Groceries; Household equipment; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Wood, John P.


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Charles Robinson presented this claim (# 61) for losses suffered at the hands of the "territorial militia and marshal's posse" on May 21, 1856. His list of losses included a frame house, barn, medical library and surgical instruments. He also claimed $10,000 for false imprisonment that was not approved. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Damage claims; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Guns; Medicine; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Weapons (see also Guns)


Report of H. J. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
William Hutchin of Linn County filed claim # 270 for various losses suffered in August, 1856. His statement described his experiences as a prisoner of G. W. Clarke and his men. His losses included horses, cash, guns, ammunition and miscellaneous items. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.

Keywords: Clarke, George W.; Damage claims; Guns; Horses; Hutchin, William; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Weapons (see also Guns)


Photograph, Gaius Jenkins
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 
Gaius Jenkins was born in New York state in 1812. He and his wife came to Kansas City, Missouri in 1853. He moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in 1854 and was active in the free state cause, serving as a Colonel in the Free State Militia. He was taken prisoner along with John Brown, Jr.; Charles Robinson and several others and held near Lecompton. He was killed in Lawrence on June 3, 1858, by James Lane over a land dispute.

Keywords: Ambrotypes; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Jenkins, Gaius; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Photographs and Illustrations; Prisoners


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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