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10 results for Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856:
Manuscript Volume, Items of 1856
Authors: Hanway, James
Date: 1856
This little journal/ledger contained a five-page account of the May 24, 1856, killings on Pottawatomie Creek, apparently written by James Hanway shortly after the incident. He mentioned the five victims by name and wrote: "The settlement is plunged into a perfect commotion. A meeting of the settlers was held on the 26th and they mutually agreed to protect each other from foreign or internal foes. All men of real good sense, condemned these midnight assassinations and also the killing of men who are attending to their concerns". This was a somewhat different perspective of the situation than expressed by Hanway in his 1860 letter to James Redpath. Nevertheless, the responsibility for "all such blood tragedies" is with the pro-slave men.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Doyle, James P.; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hanway, James; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery activities; Violence; Violent deaths; Wilkinson, Allen


Testimony taken before grand jury investigating the Pottawatomie murders
Authors: Hall, Amos ; Jackson, Harvey ; McDaniel, I. R.; Shaw, Isaac
Date: May 1856
A portion of the testimony taken before a Franklin County grand jury, under the direction of Judge Sterling G. Cato, charged with identifying the parties involved in the May 24, 1856 killings on Pottawatomie Creek.. Included are the statements of Harvey Jackson, Amos Hall, I. R. McDaniel, Luther ?, and Isaac Shaw. Hall stated that he had seen "Old Man Brown" [John Brown] in a wagon on May 22, 1856. A one page explanation of the testimony signed by Edward Hoogland is attached.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Free state activities; Hall, Amos; Hoogland, Edward; Jackson, Harvey; McDaniel, I. R.; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Shaw, Isaac


Affidavits concerning William and Henry Sherman and Allen Wilkinson
Authors: Day, Mary ; Grant, John T.; Grant, William ; Morse, Francis
Date: June 12, 1856
Someone copied or took down statements from the people listed as authors concerning the personal habits of William and Henry Sherman and Allen Wilkinson. They were described as "intemperate" men. William Sherman and Allen Wilkinson were among those killed in the Pottawatomie massacre. The document is written in the same hand. All of the people making statements were free state supporters.

Keywords: Day, Mary; Doyle, James P.; Free state supporters; Grant, John T.; Grant, William; Massacres; Morse, Francis; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Sherman, Henry; Sherman, William; Wilkinson, Allen


Letter, H. H. Williams and others, to Rev. Sir [Samuel Adair]
Authors: Williams, Henry H.
Date: June 14, 1856
H. H. Williams wrote from Tecumseh, where he was imprisoned along with seven other suspects in the Pottawatomie massacre, informing Rev. Samuel Adair of their situation. The letter is also signed by the seven other prisoners--William Partridge, Jason Brown, S. W. Kilbourne, John Brown Jr., S. B. Morse, Jacob Benjamin, and P. D. Maness. He indicated that they were charged with high treason. He also reported on John Brown, Jr.'s health. Williams asked Adair to try to raise some funds for their legal defense as they had hired a lawyer.

Keywords: Benjamin, Jacob; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, Jr.; Kilbourne, S. W.; Maness, P. D.; Massacres; Morse, S. B.; Partridge, William; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Prisoners; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Treason; Williams, Henry H.


Letter, O.E. Learnard to Dear Father [S. T. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: July 23, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote his father, S.T. Learnard, that he was disappointed in the attitude of people in Vermont and throughout the North who continued to support the Pierce administration. If they did so because they were Democrats, they should learn from Andrew H. Reeder, J. H. Lane, William Y. Roberts, and others who had seen the light. Learnard admitted "a few cases" of free state retaliation "upon their oppressors," and then gave some "facts" about the "Patawotamie" incident, while not mentioning John Brown by name. Learnard believed that the reports about mangled bodies were untrue.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Northern Democrats; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Roberts, William Young; Vermont; Violence; Violent deaths


Letter, E. L. [Mrs. William] Partridge to Mr. [Samuel] Adair
Authors: Partridge, E. L. (Mrs. William)
Date: December 28, 1856
Mrs. William Partridge reported on the condition of her husband while a prisoner at Tecumseh. Mr. Partridge was one of the free state men arrested after the Pottawatomie massacre. She described his health and his prospects for being released.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Massacres; Partridge, E. L (Mrs. William); Partridge, William; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Prisoners; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory


Letter, James Hanway to R. J. Hinton
Authors: Hanway, James
Date: December 5, 1859
In response to the Redpath/Hinton notice in the Lawrence Republican, Hanway wrote from his home in Shermansville, Franklin County, to share his story about "our friend John Brown," and he hoped their efforts would convey to all Brown's "the character" and "motives" and "place him in his true light before the world." Hanway highlights the attempted "rescue of Lawrence" in May 1856; the subsequent "'Tragedy'" on Pottawatomie Creek, about which Brown personal told Hanaway, "it was a just act, to take the lives of those 5 pro-slave ruffians"; how John Brown was a surveyor who used his profession to gather intellegence among proslavery settlers; the fact, according to Hanway, that the Doyles and others were actively engaged in efforts to run free state settlers out of the area; and specifically denies the story that Frederick Brown was "insane."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border ruffians; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Hanway, James; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Proslavery settlers; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shermansville, Kansas Territory; Slave power; Surveyors


Letter, Salmon Brown to R. J. Hinton
Authors: Brown, Salmon
Date: January 10, 1860
From North Elba, New York, Salmon Brown wrote R. J. Hinton briefly regarding his father role in the Pottawatomie Creek killings of May 24, 1856. Reportedly, Gov. Charles Robinson had told James Redpath that John Brown had confessed to him that "he helped kill the Doyles" but "if Gov. R said so he lies." Brown would not have confided in Robinson, since he had not "put any confidence in Robinson after that Lawrence treaty" (ending Wakarusa War in December 1855). Salmon doesn't answer the question, but portrays the killing of "those spies" as the heoric "first blow with the sword against Slavery in this county" and insists that "they were life preservers and they saved Kansas."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Salmon; Free state cause; Hinton, Richard Josiah; North Elba, New York; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, James Hanway to My dear Sir [James Redpath]
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 12, 1860
From Shermansville, Franklin County, K.T., James Hanway, a friend and follower of John Brown during the Kansas troubles, wrote to an associate, presumably James Redpath, about a book entitled The Public Life of John Brown. Redpath was not named in document, but he wrote this book on John Brown, which was published by "Thayer & Eldridge" in 1860. Hanway enjoyed the book, thought it was, "on the whole," "a correct life of the old man," but offered to author "the facts," especially as regards the Pottawatomie massacre of May 1856. In this lengthy, detailed letter, Hanway, who was with John Jr., and some others who were not on Pottawatomie Creek when the killings took place, argued that the action was fully justified under the circumstances and that Brown gave the orders, even though he personally killed none of the victims.

Keywords: Brown, Frederick; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Hanway, James; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Massacres; Ottawa Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Thompson, Henry


Statement, C. A. Foster, Was John Brown present and participating in the masacre at Pottowatomie Creek
Authors: Foster, Charles A.
Date: July 12, 1860
Signed C. A. Foster, Boston, July 12, 1860, this brief statement asserts that John Brown "was not present" at the Pottawatomie Massacre, "but that he knew that it was going to be done" and "he approved it."

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Foster, Charles A.; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.