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25 results for Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869:
Cartoon, Liberty, the Fair Maid of Kansas in the Hands of the Border Ruffians
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Undated
This cartoon depicts William L. Marcy, James Buchanan, Franklin Pierce, Lewis Cass, and Stephen Douglas harassing Liberty, the representation of Kansas Territory. A former U.S. senator from New York, Marcy was a leader of the conservative Democrats, with pro-Southern leanings much like those of presidents Pierce and Buchanan; Marcy served as secretary of war (1845-1849) under James K. Polk and secretary of state (1853-1857) under President Pierce, during the worst of the Kansas troubles.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Cartoons; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Political cartoons


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus, on a political trip to discuss the 'Kansas Question" with members of the U.S. Congress, told him that the "dead-lock in the House has paralyzed [Washington] society" and that social engagements had been "quiet". He wrote Edwin of his surprise to hear an abolitionist speech as a Sunday sermon, and of his desire to speak with Tom Hendricks, Commissioner of the Land Office, regarding the prospective decline in availability of land warrants.

Keywords: Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; Violence


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus, on a political trip to discuss the 'Kansas Question" with members of the U.S. Congress, told him that the "dead-lock in the House has paralyzed [Washington] society" and that social engagements had been "quiet". He wrote Edwin of his surprise to hear an abolitionist speech as a Sunday sermon, and of his desire to speak with Tom Hendricks, Commissioner of the Land Office, regarding the prospective decline in availability of land warrants.

Keywords: Kansas question; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress


Letter, A. A. Lawrence to My dear Sir [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: January 31, 1856
From Boston, January 31, 1856, Amos Lawrence wrote to advise his friend Charles Robinson submit to the authority of recognized officers of the U.S. government, no matter how unjust their actions appeared. He suggested that Robinson follow the "Fabian policy" of non-violent, peaceful resistance, and do what he could to discourage "all aggression" on the part of free-state men.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Massachusetts; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slave power; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement)


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: February 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother Edwin Parrott in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus described his experiences mixing his social engagements with politics, having to navigate through discussions with members of different parties. He mentioned the distrust he had for certain acquaintances that were also active in the government, and seemed frustrated by his only modestly successful attempts to discuss the Kansas question with them.

Keywords: Iverson, Alfred; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Medill, William; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, M. W. Delahay to Genl. C. Robinson, Col. J. H. Lane & Others
Authors: Delahay, Mark W.
Date: February 16, 1856
From Washington, D.C., on February 16, 1856, Mark Delahay, the Free State Party's would be representative to the 34th Congress, wrote to his free state colleagues regarding President Franklin Pierce's directive to Governor Wilson Shannon. The latter was "to arrest and punish all who may take part in the making and putting inforce any law in oposition to the Territorial laws now upon the Statute Book." Delahay warned against "the organization of an independent State Government" and wrote "we are upon the brink of a crisis of serious import." (See D.W. Wilder, Annals of Kansas, 109-110.)

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Free state government; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, A. H. Reeder to Dear Doctor [Charles Robinson]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 16, 1856
From "Washington City" on February 16, 1856, former K.T. governor Andrew Reeder wrote Charles Robinson regarding his (Reeder's) efforts to influence Kansas policy in the nation's capital. Reeder was working through friends, since he no longer had personal influence with President Pierce, and he was not pleased with the president's February 11 proclamation, which he called "the low contemptible trickstering affair which might expected from Pierce, and is like the Special Message [of January 24] a slander on the Free State Party." Nevertheless, Reeder thought it could have been worse and insisted that Robinson and the other free-state leaders "should not organize the State Govt." Pierce would just use that action to justify aggressive moves to suppress the movement.

Keywords: Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Washington, D.C.


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 26, 1856
Cyrus K. Holliday reported an uncertain peace from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. President Franklin Pierce's January 24th announcement had commanded assemblies organized against the constitutional territorial government to disperse, and whether Missourians would carry out a threatened attack at the March 4th meeting in Topeka was unknown. Cyrus hoped to visit Meadville and sent a message to Professor Hammett. He also told Mary of his commission as Brigadier General of the Free State military.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Missourians; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, J.C. Fremont to Gov. Charles Robinson
Authors: Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890
Date: March 17, 1856
From New York, on March 17, 1856, three months before accepting the Republican Party nomination for president, John C. Fremont wrote this letter of support and encouragement to Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas. The two men had participated together in the political affairs of California a few years earlier, and Fremont compared the current controversy over the "Kansas question" with the previous incident. Fremont only briefly addressed Robinson's questions about a possible presidential bid.

Keywords: Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; New York; Pierce administration; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Army


House Executive Documents, 34th Congress, 1st Session, v.9, Executive Document No.66, Executive Minutes of the Territory of Kansas
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: March 24, 1856
President Franklin Pierce, along with his Secretary of State, complied with a resolution brought forth by the House of Representatives, which requested the "transmission of documents touching the affairs of the Territory of Kansas." The contents of these span from January 1, 1855- June 1855, and include the description of judicial districts and voting precincts as constructed by Territorial Governor Andrew Reeder. Also transmitted are Records of Oath for various Territorial justices and constables, voter census tables, and Territorial Legislature election returns of March 1855. Claims of election fraud in each district are also addressed by Governor Reeder.

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, March 1855; Executive departments - Kansas Territory; Kansas Territory. Judicial system; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 9, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent events, which were "unfathomably deep in the waters of territorial trouble". He described the movement of armed men towards Lawrence, a mix of U.S. troops and militiamen from Missouri. Marcus also referred to the current situations of Robinson, Reeder, Lane, and other men who were to play important roles in the imminent Sack of Lawrence. Despite these threats, Marcus still commented on his own economic situation and again asked for money from his brother and father.

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Telegraph; Town development


Letter, Geo. W. Smith, et al to the Friends of Law and Order convened at Topeka
Authors: Brown, Jr., John ; Deitzler, George W.; Jenkins, Gaius ; Robinson, Charles ; Smith, George W.; Williams, Henry H.
Date: July 1, 1856
From a "camp near Lecompton," George W. Smith and the other Free State captives, including Charles Robinson and John Brown, Jr., wrote to state their views on issues facing the Topeka legislature as it convened. First, Smith and company argued that the freestaters had a "right to meet as a Legislature, complete the State organization and pass all laws necessary to the successful administration of Justice," but the assembly should not resist "Federal officer in the service of the legal process" unless they threaten the state organization. Smith, et al, believe success of the cause depended on "a right position and, second upon calm, and unflinching firmness."

Keywords: Blood, James; Brown, John, Jr.; Deitzler, George W.; Federal troops; Free state cause; Free state government; Jenkins, Gaius; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory; United States Government; Williams, Henry H.


Letter, O.E. Learnard to Dear Father [S. T. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: July 23, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote his father, S.T. Learnard, that he was disappointed in the attitude of people in Vermont and throughout the North who continued to support the Pierce administration. If they did so because they were Democrats, they should learn from Andrew H. Reeder, J. H. Lane, William Y. Roberts, and others who had seen the light. Learnard admitted "a few cases" of free state retaliation "upon their oppressors," and then gave some "facts" about the "Patawotamie" incident, while not mentioning John Brown by name. Learnard believed that the reports about mangled bodies were untrue.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Northern Democrats; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Pottawatomie Massacre, May 1856; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Roberts, William Young; Vermont; Violence; Violent deaths


Letter, C. Robinson, Camp Sacket, to Hon. J. C. Fremont
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: July 28, 1856
While a prisoner at Camp Sackett near Lecompton, Robinson informed Fremont that James Emery was traveling east and should be used in Fremont's presidential campaign as a stump speaker as he "can do good service to the cause." Robinson also indicated that he did not know if the Pierce administration had decided whether or not to hang Robinson and his fellow prisoners.

Keywords: Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Emery, James Stanley; Free state cause; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Prisons; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, [I. Sabin] to Chad Kellogg
Authors: Sabin, I.
Date: August 8, 1856
I. Sabin wrote to Chad Kellogg regarding real-estate transactions and troubles along the Missouri-Kansas border. Sabin, the commander of a 40-man company against pro-slavery forces, described the amount of firearms needed by each fighting man and his lack of money with which to purchase them. The letter is written on a printed circular "Appeal of Kansas to the Voters of the Free States," which enumerates various offenses done to free state men, focusing particularly on the contested election of 1856.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Brown, Frederick; Buford, Jefferson; Free state perspective; Guns; Kellogg, Chad; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Popular sovereignty; Sabin, I.; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Madam [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 3? 1856
Amos A. Lawrence, in Boston, wrote to Sara Robinson regarding her husband's desire to retire from the Emigrant Aid Company, advising her that he not do so until after the November presidential elections. Lawrence also suggested to her that, when writing to President Pierce, she might call him "President" and not "Mister", in order to further her cause. He admitted to Mrs. Robinson, though, that he "has no more love for him" than she does.

Keywords: Davis, Jefferson; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to S. N. Simpson
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 6, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to Samuel Simpson in Kansas Territory, complaining to him that he had not received the map and information on the newly purchased Wyandotte lands Simpson was to send him. Hill expressed a desire to purchase two or three town shares if they were not too expensive, bringing the value of his investments in Kansas to almost half of his total worth. His aim, as he expressed it, was "first to make money, secondly help the Caus [sic] of freedom". Hill also communicated his dislike for President Pierce's recent statements, and that the free state supporters lobbying in Washington were having "pretty warm work."

Keywords: Armstrong, Silas; Hill, Hiram; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town companies


Pamphlet, "Affairs in Kansas"
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This pamphlet contains a proclamation made by President Franklin Pierce and a speech by Senator Isaac Toucey. Also included are printed copies of letters and papers which date from December 1, 1855 to February 18, 1856, and communicate between Governor Wilson Shannon and other officials in Kansas Territory and the President and officials of the federal government which relate to "difficulties" in Kansas Territory. In this document, free state efforts are described as those of a "secret military organization" working against the legitimate Territorial Government.

Keywords: Buckley, H.H.; Calhoun, John; Clarke, George W.; Davis, Jefferson; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Free state militia; Hargis, S.N.; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marcy, William L.; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Richardson, William P.; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Shawnee Mission; Skirmishing; Strickler, Hiram Jackson; Toucey, Isaac; Weapons (see also Guns); Westport, Missouri


Letter, draft of, written by Amos Lawrence for Sara Robinson
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: 1856
According to Frank W. Blackmar, who reprinted this document in the appendix of his book, The Life of Charles Robinson (1901), it was "a draft of a letter sent by Amos A. Lawrence to be re-written and signed by Mrs. Robinson and addressed to Mrs. Lawrence, [a "relative" of President Pierce and] the mother of Amos A. Lawrence. The letter," which concerns Charles Robinson's imprisonment (May 10-Sept. 10, 1856 ) in K.T., was sent by Mrs. Lawrence to Mrs. Pierce, wife of the President who gave it to the President to read."]

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Bogus legislature; Election fraud; Free state cause; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Treason


Letter, B. Darrach to Rev. S. L. Adair
Authors: Darrach, Barstow
Date: January 8, 1857
Darrach at New York Hospital commented on events at the national level and the prospect of little support for the free state cause from Congress or the President. He reported that John Brown was in New York speaking about Kansas and trying to raise some funds and other support.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Darrach, Barstow; Free state perspective; National politics; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869


Letter, O. [Owen] C. Brown to My dear Brother [Samuel Adair]
Authors: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: January 21, 1857
O. C. Brown wrote from Utica, New York, to Samuel Adair, in Osawatomie, KansasTerritory. He wrote about speaking engagements on behalf of Kansas. He mentioned Gov. Geary and President Pierce.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Free state support; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); National politics; New York; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Relief; Utica, New York


Letter, J. [John] W. Whitfield to Dear [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Whitfield, John W. (Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879
Date: February 1, 1857
John W. Whitfield, the Kansas Territory's delegate to Congress to March 3, 1857, wrote to Halderman from "Washington City" regarding the "H__l of a fight" they had had "over Lecompte." (Samuel D. Lecompte, chief justice of the KT from December 1854 to March 1859; President Pierce had appointed James O. Harrison to replace Lecompte in December 1856, but Congress refused to confirm him.) Whitfield thought it likely that it would be left to "Old Buck" (President elect James Buchanan) to settle things. He also wrote concerning his own political prospects and what he was accomplishing for Kansas (e.g. railroad legislation).

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Chief justice; Harrison, James O.; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Pacific railroads; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.; Whitfield, John W. (John Wilkins), ca. 1826-1879


Letter, J. Henry Muzzy to Dear Sir [Eli Thayer]
Authors: Muzzy, J. Henry
Date: March 3, 1857
J. Henry Muzzy wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Muzzy informed Thayer that free state supporters in Kansas were not, as Thayer had predicted, discouraged by James Buchanan's election as president in November 1856. He observed that the territory had been quiet during the winter of 1856-1857, but warned that the "ruffians" likely would engage in efforts during the spring of 1857 to discourage eastern emigration to Kansas. Muzzy also commented on the dilemma that free staters faced in deciding whether to pay the taxes levied by the proslavery "bogus legislature." He and his fellow free state supporters were not inclined to pay taxes imposed by a "foreign power," but they also realized that if Governor Geary called in U.S. troops to enforce the law they would have no choice but to pay. Muzzy concluded by stating that he was thankful for the end of the "reign of Frank Pierce," contending that "any change at Washington can hardly be for the worse."

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Muzzy, J. Henry; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Relief; Taxation; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [G. W. Brown]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: April 13, 1859
With regard to the formation of the Republican Party at the forthcoming Osawatomie convention, Ewing told George W. Brown, editor of Lawrence's Herald of Freedom, why he believed this was the right course for the "opposition" to take at this time. The Free State Party had, in his opinion, accomplished its objectives, and the Democratic Party contained a proslave faction and was affiliated with the administration. Ewing's objective was "to secure an organization of the Republican or opposition party at Osawattomie [sic], on a just and rational platform, and led by honest & conservative men."

Keywords: Big Springs Convention; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free State Party; Herald of Freedom; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Osawatomie convention; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Proslavery; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Photograph, Franklin Pierce
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
Portrait of Franklin Pierce, President of the United States from 1853-1857.

Keywords: Engravings; Photographs and Illustrations; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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