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64 results for Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879:
Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin A. Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: June 11, 1855
Marcus J. Parrott wrote from the Shawnee Methodist Mission in Kansas Territory to his brother, Edwin A. Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus reported to Edwin that he was in need of money, and told him of his plan to borrow some from their father to invest. He expressed his support for the free state cause, but disagreed with recent violent acts that had occurred on the part of a free state man. Marcus also referred to the Territorial Legislature, which would convene at Pawnee, and anticipated "a grand row and smash up as a result".

Keywords: Free state perspective; Johnson County, Kansas Territory; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pawnee, Kansas Territory; Shawnee Indians; Weston, Missouri; Westport, Missouri


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Father [Thomas Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: July 28, 1855
Marcus Parrott, a lawyer and free state man, wrote to his father, Thomas Parrott, from the Shawnee Methodist Mission in Kansas Territory. Marcus told his father of his desire to purchase land and build a home in Leavenworth City, for which he asked his father to send money for lumber. He also mentioned business and referred to his role in the defense of Cole McCrea, a free state man who had killed Malcolm Clark in Leavenworth the past April. Marcus also mentioned his prospect of being nominated as Reporter to the Supreme Court, which he saw as good advertising only.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Freight and freightage; Johnson County, Kansas Territory; Kansas Territory. Judicial system; Lawyers; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; McCrea, Cole; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Parrott, Thomas; Shawnee Mission; Timber


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 26, 1855
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 26, 1855
On Friday, October 26, 1855, the convention conducted some routine business but also entertained a motion by Mark W. Delahay of Leavenworth: "Resolved--That this Convention, approve the principles of non intervention in the local affairs of Kansas, as enunciated by the 'Nebraska, Kansas Act,' and that this Convention recommend to the people of Kansas a strict observance of the principles laid down in said act." In other words, he opposed the creation of a provisional government to rival the federally recognized territorial government--see Delahay's speech on this subject, as reported in "Kansas Freeman," November 14, 1855. The resolution was tabled.

Keywords: Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Kansas Nebraska Act; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 26, 1855
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 26, 1855
During the afternoon session on Friday, October 26, 1855, the convention returned to the issue raised by Delahay that morning, among other more mundane matters.

Keywords: Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Kansas Freeman; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory


Journal, Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 30, 1855
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: October 30, 1855
During this session of the constitutional convention, delegates dealt briefly with the question of "an immediate organization of a State Government," a highly controversial issue, and considered a report on the militia. Lively debate on the latter issue seems to have followed, although not much detail is given here, with Charles Robinson offering an amendment "striking out the word white--" This presumably would have had the effect of making African Americans and Indians eligible for service, but the amendment failed seven to twenty-four.

Keywords: African Americans; Constitutions; Delahay, Mark W.; Free State Party; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Militia; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Smith, Samuel C.; Suffrage; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Topeka, Kansas Territory; Voting


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin A. Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: November 25, 1855
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth City, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin A. Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marc told his brother about his recent efforts in defending Cole McCrea, on trial before Judge Lecompte for murder. He also urged his brother to come to Kansas Territory by describing business and land purchase opportunities there. Marc also referred to an upcoming meeting of free state men, which would serve "as a counterblast to the proslavery one".

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Balls (parties); Business enterprises; Free state activities; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; McCrea, Cole; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. General Land Office


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Father [Thomas Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 13, 1855
Marcus Parrot wrote from Leavenworth City, Kansas Territory, to his father, Thomas Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus told him that the local citizens had been in "a state of war for the last ten days", referring to the events of the Wakarusa War. Marcus had raised his own company of free state men to fight the invading Missourians, and was captured by them, but freed at the conclusion of the skirmish. He also mentioned a duel which was supposed to take place (but never occurred) between James Lane and G.P. Lowery, in which he himself was to be Lane's "second".

Keywords: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lowrey, G.P. (Grosvenor P.); Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Parrott, Thomas; Wakarusa River; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, unsigned [Marc Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 15, 1855
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus recounted the events of the Wakarusa War, and described the actions of the Missourians prior to their attack, which supported his idea that it was premeditated. He told about his experience as a prisoner in the Missourians' camp and his interview with Governor Shannon regarding a peace treaty between the two groups. Marcus was pleased with the terms of the treaty, but was wary of Shannon's motives, saying that he was trying to "ring in" the free state party.

Keywords: Ammunition; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Barber, Thomas W.; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Weapons (see also Guns)


People's Proclamation
Authors: Emery, James Stanley; Foster, Charles A.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Y.; Robinson, Charles ; Smith, George W.; Sylvester, S. D.; Wakefield, J. A.
Date: 1855
This broadside represented the efforts of free state supporters to encourage residents to vote in the election for the delegate to represent Kansas Territory in Congress that was held October 9, 1855. It listed the polling places, the instructions to judges, and the qualifications for "lawful" voters. This document was probably related to a circular letter signed by Charles Robinson that encouraged free state supporters to see that elections were conducted according to the printed procedures for both the election for delegates to Congress and for delegates to the constitutional convention. The broadside indicated that it had been signed by nearly 1000 persons but space allowed for the printing of the following names only: C. K Holliday, J. A. Wakefield, C. Robinson, J. H. Lane, C. A. Foster, M. J. Parrott, S. D. Sylvester, W. Y. Roberts, G. W. Smith and J. S. Emery. This election was held under the auspices of the Topeka Movement.

Keywords: Elections; Emery, James Stanley; Foster, Charles A.; Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Free state supporters; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, George W.; Sylvester, S. D.; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Wakefield, John A.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus, on a political trip to discuss the 'Kansas Question" with members of the U.S. Congress, told him that the "dead-lock in the House has paralyzed [Washington] society" and that social engagements had been "quiet". He wrote Edwin of his surprise to hear an abolitionist speech as a Sunday sermon, and of his desire to speak with Tom Hendricks, Commissioner of the Land Office, regarding the prospective decline in availability of land warrants.

Keywords: Kansas question; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus, on a political trip to discuss the 'Kansas Question" with members of the U.S. Congress, told him that the "dead-lock in the House has paralyzed [Washington] society" and that social engagements had been "quiet". He wrote Edwin of his surprise to hear an abolitionist speech as a Sunday sermon, and of his desire to speak with Tom Hendricks, Commissioner of the Land Office, regarding the prospective decline in availability of land warrants.

Keywords: Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; Violence


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: February 9, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus described the events of his ride home from a business meeting in Lawrence, where he encountered a funeral procession for his friend T. C. Shoemaker, who had been beaten to death for "abusing" Mayor William E. Murphy. Marcus equated this murder to the assault on William Phillips in May 1855, and anticipated that there would only be a "so-called" trial for the men responsible. He also told his brother to be prepared to come to Kansas Territory in April.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Murphey, William E; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: February 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother Edwin Parrott in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus described his experiences mixing his social engagements with politics, having to navigate through discussions with members of different parties. He mentioned the distrust he had for certain acquaintances that were also active in the government, and seemed frustrated by his only modestly successful attempts to discuss the Kansas question with them.

Keywords: Iverson, Alfred; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Medill, William; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: April 30, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott of Dayton, Ohio, regarding his current economic situation. Marcus was quitting his private law practice for lack of demand, and remarked that there was "little chance of fair play in the courts" anyway. He intended to invest in real estate, and asked his brother and father for any money they might spare. Marcus also referred to a mass migration of men from Alabama, lead by Major Buford, who had come to settle in K.T. in support of slavery.

Keywords: Buford, Jefferson; Business enterprises; Economic conditions; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Real estate investment; Town development


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 9, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent events, which were "unfathomably deep in the waters of territorial trouble". He described the movement of armed men towards Lawrence, a mix of U.S. troops and militiamen from Missouri. Marcus also referred to the current situations of Robinson, Reeder, Lane, and other men who were to play important roles in the imminent Sack of Lawrence. Despite these threats, Marcus still commented on his own economic situation and again asked for money from his brother and father.

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Telegraph; Town development


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory to his brother, Edwin Parrott, updating him on the situation in K.T. in the days leading up to the Sack of Lawrence. Marcus told him of attempts to arrest both Andrew Reeder and Charles Robinson, and how Reeder claimed that he was privileged from arrest. He also discussed the movement of the troops and his plans to visit Neosho in the coming few days, provided that the political tensions subside.

Keywords: Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Missouri River; Neosho River, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: May 15, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote to his brother, Edwin Parrott, from Leavenworth, K.T. He told Edwin that the border ruffians had made their first move into Lawrence the night before, defeating the "Lawrence party". Marcus added that morale in the town was exceptionally low after the departure of both Reeder and Robinson, and believed that the two men, plus the editors of the "Herald of Freedom" and the "Kansas Free State" were imprisoned. He also believed that, this victory gone to the border ruffians, with the support of Governor Shannon, the free soilers would be cleansed from the area.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Buford expedition; Free soil; Miller, Josiah; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Platte County, Missouri; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sumner, Edwin Vose, 1835-1912


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: September 19, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote to his brother, Edwin Parrott, from Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Marcus described to his brother the situation in the area stemming from the Battle of Hickory Point, which occurred six days earlier. He said that the free state men involved in the battle were arrested and held in prison in Lecompton without examination, while the proslavery men met no consequence. Marcus mentioned other incidents that led him to believe crimes and schemes were taking place against free state supporters. He also brought up money and land investments again, requesting money.

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hickory Point, Battle of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Real estate investment; Town development


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: September 29, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the aftermath of the Battle of Hickory Point, which had occurred on September 13. Marcus told him that border ruffians had seized his personal letters, home, and furniture, and were questioning him about a phrase Edwin had written to him in a letter, which suggested the assassination of Judge Lecompte. Marcus stated that Governor Geary had done more damage to the Free State cause than all of his predecessors together, and feared that, if Fremont was defeated in the upcoming Presidential election, their cause would be completely lost.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Brindle, William; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free soil; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hickory Point, Battle of; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Father [Thomas Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: September 30, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his Father, Thomas Parrott. In this letter, Marcus told his father about the events that had befallen him, his letters and possessions being seized by border ruffians. He added that a letter from his brother, Edwin, in which Edwin suggested the assassination of Judge Lecompte, was drawing attention to the two of them. Marcus describes Lawrence as a dangerous place for free state supporters at this time, stating that Governor Geary "has failed to accomplish anything" in his consideration of the uprisings between free state and proslavery men.

Keywords: Bleeding Kansas; Border ruffians; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hickory Point, Battle of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Parrott, Thomas


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Father [Thomas Parrott]
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: October 7, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his father, Thomas Parrott. Marcus told him of his preparation to defend the free state men accused of murder for their role in the recent skirmishes surrounding the Battle of Hickory Point; he was not optimistic of the outcome, calling his position "embarrassing". Marcus added news of the recent election of a new Territorial Legislature, and shared poll statistics that showed a vast majority of free state supporters in several voting areas. Though this was a positive turn, he stated again that the free state cause would be in the hands of the new President.

Keywords: Courts; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free state support; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Parrott, Thomas; Proslavery activities


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: October 27, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, having recently arrived there to participate in a Constitutional Convention. Marcus instructed him to watch the newspapers for current developments as the New York Tribune, as well as other regional papers, had reporters on site. He again suggested to his brother to come to Kansas and experience the "matchless magnificence" of his home, the proslavery faction having been conquered "finally and forever", by Marcus's words.

Keywords: Constitutional conventions; Newspapers; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Marcus J. Parrott to H. Miles Moore
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 12, 1857
Parrott, the representative of Kansas Territory to the U.S. Congress, wrote to Moore from Washington offering his assessment of the upcoming session of Congress. Parrott predicted that the Congress would reject the Lecompton Constitution. He also offered Moore, a Free State advocate recently elected to the Kansas Territorial House of Representatives, advice on activities to pursue in the Territorial Legislature.

Keywords: Constitutions; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Father [Thomas Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: July 20, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his father, Thomas Parrott. Marcus began by telling him of new land sales near Paola, Kansas Territory, the extreme heat they had been having lately, and news about family friends. He spoke about a recent proclamation given by Governor Walker, who had set up camp near Lawrence, which condemned the municipal government in that city as unauthorized. Marcus added that the Free State Convention in Topeka had delegated him as their representative to Congress; he had accepted, despite worries that his private business would suffer because of the appointment.

Keywords: Free state activities; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Paola, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Parrott, Thomas; Railroads; Territorial politics; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Weather


Letter, A. A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: August 14, 1857
A. A. Lawrence, from Boston, wrote to Charles Robinson, giving his impressions of recent political and business events. Lawrence gave his support for the upcoming Missouri election, which he believed would break up the pro-slavery party. He praised Robinson's handling of Lawrence's trust funds and properties, stating "Old Brown ought to report to you. It is bad policy to have a ranger like him with money and arms at his disposal, and only accountable to people here."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Finance; Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 27, 1857
In this letter from Lawrence, K.T., Marsh reported that despite opposition from Judge Martin Conway, the delegates at the Grasshopper Falls Convention on August 26 "voted to go into the [October] Election with all the power they have." So, the stage was set for the campaign that needed all the financial support Stearns's committee could give it through Marsh.

Keywords: Congressional delegate; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Convention; Grasshopper Falls, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, [Thomas J.] Marsh to Dear Sir [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 29, 1857
From Lawrence, K.T., Thomas J. Marsh wrote to George Stearns on August 29, 1857, to describe the political situation in the territory and the results of the Grasshopper Falls Convention which had taken place three days before. Those favoring participation in the October legislative election carried the day (see Annals of Kansas, 176) and subsequently "a Grand Ratification meeting" endorse the conventions action, including the nomination of Marcus J. Parrott for delegate to Congress.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Grasshopper Falls Convention; Hutchinson, George W.; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Music; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Schuyler, Philip Church; Smith, George W.; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: September 28, 1857
In this letter to Stearns, Marsh expressed confidence that the October election would turn in favor of the Free State Party. Marsh had been traveling in the "Southern Counties" and was encouraged: "You may rest assured, that the people are united and earnest." He predicted a victory for Marcus Parrott and "a good working majority" for the Free State Party in both houses of the legislature. Unless he received further instructions from the committee, Marsh planned to leave Kansas about three days after the election.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Crusader of Freedom; Doniphan, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Marsh, Thomas J.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, John T. Jones to Mr. John Brown
Authors: Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy)
Date: October 13, 1857
"Ottawa Jones," a mixed-blood Indian who lived on Ottawa Creek in Franklin Co., wrote John Brown on October 13, 1857, regarding a financial claim/account that he was trying unsuccessfully to collect on for his friend, Brown. Jones closed by asking God to bless and reward Brown in his struggle "to bring about liberty for all men."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Finance; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Ottawa Creek, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dr Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 10, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent dramatic political events. Marcus referred to Democrat Stephen Douglas' "breaking" with President Buchanan. Both men supported popular sovereignty in Kansas, as well as the solidarity of the Union. However, the President, unwilling to override the work of what he considered a legitimate Lecompton Constitutional Convention or to cancel a local election result, asked Congress to approve the Lecompton Constitution, make Kansas momentarily a slave state, and thus enable the people there to make any new constitution they wished. But Douglas, outraged by such a distortion of his vision of popular sovereignty , broke with Buchanan and joined with the Republicans to defeat the admission of Kansas.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio, regarding Congress' apparent lack of efficiency, acting as a "circumlocution office", in which little is accomplished in the way of policy-making towards resolution of the Kansas question. Marcus described his private interview with President Buchanan, who did not seem to impress him, and mentioned that the President's party [Democratic] seemed to be "thinning" in the South.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Davis, Jefferson; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Wm. Stanley to Dear [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Stanley, William
Date: January 12, 1858
Shortly after Halderman left Leavenworth for a trip east (Washington, D. C., it is nearly certain), William Stanley wrote him from Leavenworth regarding some "excitement" that had occurred there the very day Halderman left. Many were fearful of "attack" and thus the alarms were "sounded. . . . Hundreds of free state men were soon in arms, and the proslavery party exhibited more of apprehension than I have ever witnessed before." He mentions proslavery men leaving for Shawnee, the fact that many free-state men had recently been driven out of nearby Kickapoo, that John Calhoun was given a military escort to Lecompton, and his confidence that the [Lecompton] constitution would pass the Congress.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state; Free state militia; Halderman, John Adams; Kickapoo, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Proslavery; Stanley, William


Letter, John [Brown, Jr.] to Dear Father [John Brown]
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: February 13, 1858
From Lindenville, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, John Jr. wrote his father on February 13, 1858, to report that he was ready to travel to Washington, D.C., if Brown wanted him to and to enlist the assistance of Marcus Parrott if needed. (It is unclear what kind of legislative business he intended to pursue there.) John Jr. closes by making what appears to be a veiled reference to the Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania and by relating his plan to move soon to North Elba.

Keywords: Ashtabula County, Ohio; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; North Elba, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Underground railroad; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Geo. L. Stearns Esq.
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 30, 1858
Whitman's April 30, 1858, letter to Stearns described the harmonious work conducted by the "State Convention" and its nomination of state officers under the Leavenworth Constitution. That movement, he told Stearns, would probably not "amount to much if the Lecompton Constitution is rejected. He also mentioned continued tension in Bourbon County and the route of U.S. troops by "the free State boys" of Fort Scott.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Convention; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Army; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My Dear Friend [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 30, 1858
Among other things, Whitman wrote to Sanborn from Lawrence on April 30, 1858, regarding increased activity on the region's U.G.R.R. due in part to the fact that proslavery men in Missouri knew they had lost the battle for Kansas and "large gangs of slaves are already made up for Texas and the Extreme South, in case Lecompton fails to pass. Political harmony had, for the most part, returned to the Free State Party and "we have broken the back bone of the Slave power."

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Free state cause; Jefferson City, Missouri; Missouri; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Slave power; Slaveholders; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Underground railroad; United States. Army; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Marc Parrott to O. E. Learnard
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: June 12, 1858
Marcus Parrott, Representative of Kansas Territory to the U. S. Congress, wrote to Oscar Learnard from Washington, D. C. reacting to the news of Gaius Jenkins' death at the hand of fellow free state man, James Lane. He referred to several friends and colleagues with whom he was eager to reunite upon his return to Lawrence soon after the 25th of the month.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Free state activities; Jenkins, Gaius; Land claim disputes; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus told his brother of his experience in Washington: "awfully dull, nothing like an exciting party or an interesting debate thus far". He discussed to his social life and upcoming trips to Cuba, and also to Boston to meet with the Directors of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Marcus did elaborate on one message that had been clearly communicated to him in the House: that opponents of the "Lecompton party" were not encouraged to unite.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh Boyle; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; United States. Congress. House; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Milton Fithion]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: March 14, 1859
Recently back in Leavenworth after spending the winter in Washington conducting railroad business, Thomas Ewing, Jr., wrote to Milton Fithion [?] of Urbana, Ohio, regarding payment for what was apparently a bogus "Wyandot float." Such a claim, if valid, "would be worth from $1,500 to $2,000," but Marcus Parrott, who had agreed to buy the float had discovered that the named "Wyandot" was not included in the "treaties as entitled to land."

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fithion, Milton; Indian treaties; Land claims; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Urbana, Ohio; Wyandot Float


Letter, [Marc Parrott] to Dr. Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: c. 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, of Ohio. Marcus inquired about the "mixed politics" he had heard about in Ohio. He also remarked that he anticipated being a candidate for Congress, and expressed his interest in visiting Pike's Peak. Marcus added that he would leave the following morning for Wyandotte in order to attend the Constitutional Convention there, and projected that there would be trouble since the Republicans held a heavy majority.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Free State Party; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Report of Edward Hoogland, H.J. Adams and S.A. Kingman, Commissioners of Claims
Authors: Adams, Henry J.; Hoogland, Edward ; Kingman, Samuel A.
Date: July 11, 1859
Hoogland, Adams, and Kingman, Commissioners of Claims appointed by resolution of Governor Medary, continued investigating property and monetary losses suffered by the citizens of Kansas Territory after H.J. Strickler vacated the post. The new Claims Commissioners also believed that the responsibility for paying these loss claims rested with the General (Federal) Government. They reassessed the claims reported by Strickler, obtaining more information about the claimants and their losses, which included each claimant's political affiliation (free state or proslavery), their specific damages (house, horses, crops, etc), and who caused the damage (on behalf of either the free state or proslavery cause); this information is summed up in a supplemental table. The Claims Commissioners believed that the total value of losses occurring between November 1, 1855, and December 1, 1856, approximated at least $2,000,000; they also concluded that during skirmishes free state men had caused $94,500 in property damage, while proslavery men were believed to have caused nearly $319,000.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Border disputes and warfare; Damage claims; Free state activities; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hoogland, Edward; Kingman, Samuel A.; McKay, William; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Newspapers; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Proslavery activities; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Skirmishing; Strickler, Hiram Jackson


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: July 27, 1859
In this letter to Hugh Ewing in Washington, D.C., Ewing, Jr. sought his brother's consent to donate "a lot" to Leavenworth's German Catholic to help with the construction of a "new building" (the pastor wanted to hold a raffle for the property to raise money). Perhaps more importantly, Ewing, Jr. wrote of political developments in which their business associate Hamp Denman was a likely Democratic nominee for governor, and he (T.E., Jr.) felt "strongly inclined to take the place on our [the Republican] ticket of Chief Justice of Supreme Court (a nomination he received in October; Ewing subsequently won election to that office in the December general election). Ewing also observed that the Republican Party was weaker in Leavenworth County than he anticipated and predicted that "the new Constitution [Wyandotte] will be unpopular in this County & and lose us many votes--not so much for its failure to exclude negroes as for its unjust & dishonest apportionment . . ."

Keywords: African Americans; Apportionment; Catholic Church; Churches; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denman, Hamp B.; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Halderman, John Adams; Johnston, Sanders W.; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Miege, John Baptist; Mitchell, Robert Byington; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: October 13, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus had been traveling around Fort Riley and prepared for a trip from Manhattan to Topeka. He asked his brother how his election went, and contrasted what must be Edwin's election experience with his own, over which the "fear of a fraudulent defeat" always hovered. Despite this fear of fraud, Marcus stated that his Black Republican friends would support him, "ready to correct any errors".

Keywords: Black Republicans; Election fraud; Elections; Fort Riley, Kansas Territory; Hunting; Junction City, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Mormon Church; Ohio; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. Robinson to My Dear Sir [Amos A. Lawrence]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: November 12, 1859
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, expressing his concern that Lawrence's name was not included on a college proposal submitted by S.N. Simpson, which indicated he was not among the supporters of the enterprise. Robinson mentioned the upcoming election for Territorial delegate to Congress, in which Marcus Parrott, a Republican, was a favorite. He also sought advice from Lawrence about a complicated financial matter.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Elections; Finance; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Universities and colleges


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: November 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus, up for reelection as delegate to Congress and anxious to receive the voter returns, shared his feelings with his brother. He mentioned a problem in Pikes Peak that was delaying the results, and advised Edwin that he should look for him in Ohio in two weeks. Marcus also suggested that Edwin accompany him to Washington, stating "it would be good training ground for the Ohio Legislature".

Keywords: Election fraud; Elections; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Ohio; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: December 16, 1859
Ewing wrote Republican Congressman John Sherman in Washington, D.C., to implore him not to support the appointment of William Montgomery (D., Pa.) to the Committee on Public Lands. The Pennsylvania congressman was heavily invested in Atchison and could be expected to continue to support an inequitable Public Land bill.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Land acquisition; Land speculation; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, William; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [John Hanna]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 26, 1860
In this letter to a friend in Greencastle, Indiana, Ewing made numerous observations about the state of Kansas politics, of which he wrote: "Politics in Kansas you know are a business to those caught in the whirlpool." Ewing thought the state government was "pretty well officered" but was concerned about prospects for the senatorial contest. "Lane is nearly dead with the politicians. . . But he is a power with the people. . . . I look on Lane as a decidedly bad man," even though he recognized Lane's positive "service to the cause before the [Lawrence free-state] Convention in Decr 1857."

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Hanna, John; Journalism; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Moore, H. Miles (Henry Miles), b. 1826; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate; Vaughan, Champion


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: February 2, 1860
In a lengthy letter to his father back in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing, Jr., provided some observations and analysis of the Kansas political scene, especially as it pertained to the forthcoming election of U.S. senators. The counties north of the Kansas River would likely get either Marcus J. Parrott or Samuel C. Pomeroy, and the latter worried Ewing primarily because he was an Atchison promoter.

Keywords: Apprenticeship; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Denman, Hamp B.; Ewing, Thomas, 1789-1871; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lancaster, Ohio; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Machinists; Moore, Ely; Ohio; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Russell, William H (of Russell, Majors and Waddell); United States. Congress. Senate; United States. General Land Office


Letter, Marcus J. Parrott to Isaac T. Goodnow
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: March 4, 1860
Marcus Parrott, Kansas Territory's elected delegate to Congress, wrote to Isaac Goodnow from Washington, D.C. Parrott reported the status of a bill recently submitted on behalf of the Trustees of Bluemont College, which would give them the legal title to the College site. Parrott did not foresee any obstacles to its passing, save the "procrastination of business by the House of Reps."

Keywords: Bills, legislative; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress. House; Universities and colleges


Letter, M. J. Parrott to S. N. Wood
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: March 28, 1860
From Washington, D.C., the territory's delegate to Congress, Marcus J. Parrott wrote Wood about several issues, including the establishment of mail routes and railroad matters. Regarding the latter, he briefly discusses pending legislation and possible outcomes.

Keywords: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Postal service; Railroad legislation; Railroads; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, R. S. Stevens to S. N. Wood
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 2, 1860
R. S. Stevens, a Democratic attorney who had a variety of financial interests in Kansas during the 1850s and 1860s, wrote this letter to Wood from Washington, D.C., where he (Stevens) seemed to be lobbying for a number of concessions for himself and Kansas Territory. Specifically, he wrote of mail routes and "grants for R Rr" [railroads], which would not be forthcoming because of the Republicans who "care[d] nothing about us [Kansas] except so far as political capital can be made." Much of the letter is a condemnation of the Republican Party, which he also wrote was holding up Kansas admission so it could be used against the Democrats, and the final page addressed action, or inaction, with regard to Indian treaties and land.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Indian lands; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Railroads; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Stevens, Robert S.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, Joseph Denison to Br. [Isaac] Goodnow
Authors: Denison, Joseph
Date: May 21, 1860
Joseph Denison wrote from Powhattan, Brown County, K.T., to Isaac Goodnow regarding issues of management of the church and college they had recently constructed. Denison had discovered that, due to the state of their treasury, some property needed to be sold in order to pay the taxes on the church lots. He also worried about the state of Bluemont College, as it had thus far only attracted 20 students.

Keywords: Bills, legislative; Bluemont Central College; Business enterprises; Churches; Denison, Joseph; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Taxation; United States. Congress; Universities and colleges; de Vivaldi, Charles F.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Parrott [Marcus J. Parrott]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: September 27, 1860
In late September 1860, Ewing wrote Marcus J. Parrott, the territory's delegate to Congress (Washington, D.C.) regarding prospective railroad legislation. Ewing thought it was time Parrott made himself "heard on this momentous question"--specifically, the focus was then on the "Vandiver bill" in Congress and the influence the Topeka (Railroad) Convention might have on congressional action.

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pawnee and Western Railroad; Railroad conventions; Railroads; United States. Congress


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Dear [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: November 2, 1860
This letter was written to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, by S. C. Pomeroy regarding their relief efforts during the drought of 1860. Pomeroy mentioned in this letter a convention that was called to meet in Lawrence on November 14, 1860. He pasted the advertisement for this convention to the first page of the letter, it had been published in the (Leavenworth?) Daily Times on October 31, 1860.

Keywords: Droughts; Famines; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Hyatt, Theodore; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Relief


Circular, An appeal from Kansas!
Authors: Byrd, J. H.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Reynolds, Charles ; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877
Date: December 14, 1860
This circular detailed the beginnings of the Territorial Executive Committee, which was in charge of collecting relief to aid the struggling settlers of Kansas during the drought of 1860. This committee met in Lawrence, Kansas Territory on November 14, 1860 and passed several resolutions. From 24 Kansas counties 101 delegates were present, and out of this number four men were elected officers, including Samuel Pomeroy. The circular concluded with "Suggestions and Directions to those who purpose Aiding us in our Distress."

Keywords: Bodwell, Lewis; Byrd, J. H.; Circulars; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Fairchild, George H.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lines, C. B.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Relief; Reynolds, Charles; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 19, 1860
On December 19, 1860, Charles Robinson again wrote to his wife from Washington, D.C., where he was lobbying members of Congress and other officials on behalf of Kansas and himself. Numerous Kansans, including Robinson, who conducting a vigorous campaign for appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, were seeking positions in the new administration. "Unless men lie beyond all comprehension," wrote Robinson the ultimately unsuccessful office seeker, "I don't see how I can fail of the appointment."

Keywords: Blair, Montgomery; Conway, Martin Franklin; Gray, Alfred; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1860
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the political situation there. Marcus suspected that an organization existed, on the part of Virginia and Maryland, to block the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, and stated that, if the national situation did not better itself, that he had "no doubt that he [Lincoln] will sacrifice his life" improving it. He added that economic conditions were poor, and that many Congressmen were left unpaid.

Keywords: Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Economic conditions; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Secession; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marcus J. Parrott to Isaac Goodnow
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 30, 1860
Marcus Parrott, Kansas Territory's delegate to Congress, wrote from Washington D.C. to Isaac Goodnow, confirming with him that he could safely count on the passage of his "College Bill" this legislative session. Goodnow, along with the other members of the Board of Trustees of Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, had submitted a bill to the legislature that would grant them legal title to the College and the land it occupied.

Keywords: Bills, legislative; Bluemont Central College; Business enterprises; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress


Starving Kansas
Authors: Stockmyer, G.
Date: December, 1860
This broadside was prepared by G. Stockmyer, agent for Kansas Relief. It included descriptions of the conditions in most parts of Kansas Territory from individuals such as Thaddeus Hyatt, Allen Hodgson, and W. F. M. Arny and excerpts from various newspapers. Relief efforts were being coordinated by Samuel C. Pomeroy from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Freight and railroad companies provided free shipping for relief goods sent to K. T.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Atchison, Kansas Territory; Ballard, J. F.; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Chase County, Kansas Territory; Droughts; Grimes, W. H.; Hodgson, Allen; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas Relief Committee; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Relief; Reynolds, Charles; Stockmyer, G; Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory; Winchell, J. M.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Hugh [Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 17, 1861
To his brother Hugh Ewing, who was apparently visiting family in Lancaster, Ohio, Thomas Ewing wrote concerning his upcoming trip to New York and Washington. His major focus was the prospect of Charles Robinson being appointed Commissioner of Indian affairs in the new administration, and his (Ewing's) likely selection to the U.S. Senate if Robinson captured that position.

Keywords: Civil war; Ewing, Hugh; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lancaster, Ohio; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; New York, New York; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1861
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C. to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Ohio. Marcus began his letter berating his brother for his inconsistent correspondence; he himself, though very busy, managed to write Edwin regularly. Marcus also voiced his frustration with Congress, declaring this to be his last week as a Delegate, and predicted that both Republicans' and Democrats' stubbornness would cause the country to permanently divide. Kansas would become a state on January 29, only three days later.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Blair, Frank; Brown, Thomas; Democratic Party (U.S.); National politics; Ohio; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Secession; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Sol Miller to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Miller, Solomon
Date: February 28, 1861
Written less than a month after Kansas became a state, Miller comments on the developing political situation as a carry over from the territorial period, reflecting, for example, on the conflict between the governor and James H. Lane and the selection of U.S. senators for Kansas. Miller had supported Robinson in the past and was now seeking appointment to a particular "Agency," but he refused "sell" his support to anyone for such a position.

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Miller, Solomon (Sol); Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Patronage, political; Political corruption; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Senate (see Unites States. Congress. Senate); Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Congress. Senate


Photograph, Marcus J. Parrott
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1857
A portrait of Marcus J. Parrott, a lawyer and politician from Leavenworth. He was a member of the Topeka Constitutional Convention, 1855. In 1857, Parrott was a delegate to the Free-State Conventions at Topeka, Centropolis, and Grasshopper Falls. In 1857 and 1859, he was elected the Kansas Territorial delegate in Congress.

Keywords: Engravings; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Photographs and Illustrations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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