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45 results for Objects:
Surveying Equipment
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1845-1855
Albert D. Searl used this equipment to survey Kansas Territory town sites in 1854. Lawrence was surveyed on Sept. 25th and Topeka on Dec. 20th. Searl's efforts to set town limits for free-staters in Lawrence were met with violence from pro-slavery forces nearby. Searl would later survey Manhattan, Osawatomie, Burlington, & El Dorado.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Burlington, Kansas Territory; Coffey County, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Free state cause; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Objects; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Searl, Albert D.; Skirmishing; Surveyors; Topeka, Kansas; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Violence


John Brown Melodeon
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1846-1857
Abolitionist John Brown gave this melodeon to his daughter, Ruth Brown Thompson, as a wedding present. It was played at John Brown's funeral on Dec. 8, 1859. He originally purchased the melodeon from a musician in New York. Patent dates stamped on the instrument range from 1846 to 1857. It was manufactured by Carhart & Needham Organs and Melodeons of New York.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Carhart & Needham Organs and Melodeons; Entertainment; Funerals; Marriage; Music; New York; Objects; Thompson, Ruth (Brown); Violent deaths


Kansas Territorial Seal
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 30, 1854
The Kansas territorial seal supposedly was engraved by Robert Lovett of Philadelphia from a design developed by Andrew H. Reeder, the first Territorial Governor of Kansas. Encircling the border of the two-inch brass die is the text, "SEAL OF THE TERRITORY OF KANSAS / ERECTED MAY 30, 1854." The face features a pioneer holding a rifle and hatchet opposite Ceres (the goddess of agriculture) who stands next to a sheaf of grain. At their feet lie a tree and the axe that felled it. Between these two figures is a shield with a plow in the top compartment and a hunter stalking a buffalo below. Above the shield is a banner reading, "POPULI VOCE NATA." This Latin motto has been translated to read "Born by the voice of the people" or "Born of the popular will." The motto speaks directly to the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, creating the territory and establishing popular sovereignty whereby voting residents would decide if Kansas became a slave or free state.

Keywords: Agricultural implements; Agriculture; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas Territory; Objects; Popular sovereignty; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Territorial government


Walker Shotgun
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1854
Shotgun of Captain Samuel Walker, brought by him to Kansas in June, 1854, and used in the Battle of Fort Titus.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state cause; Guns; Objects; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas; Weapons (see also Guns)


Writing Case
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1854
A writing case used to hold business papers, used by Charles E. Fox. Fox settled in Doniphan County in the 1850s.

Keywords: Business; Businessmen; Doniphan County, Kansas Territory; Fox, Charles E.; Objects


Pro-slavery Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855
This flag was created by pro-slavery Missourians who captured Free State supporter Reverend Pardee Butler of Atchison in April 1855. The pro-slavery men sent Butler adrift on a raft down the turbulent Missouri River with this flag flying from it. The Missourians wanted others to know that the minister had helped slaves escape. Although he was expected to drown, Butler survived.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Butler, Rev. Pardee; Butler, Rev. Pardee; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Flags and banners; Greeley, Horace, 1811-1872; Missourians; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Slavery; Underground railroad; Violence


Kansas pioneer staking his squatter claim, 1855
Authors: Reader, Samuel James
Date: July 26, 1855
Samuel Reader painted this watercolor of himself staking a claim at Indianola. Reader moved to Kansas from Illinois in 1855, attracted by "rich, cheap farm land" (as stated in his autobiography). The inscription on the painting reads, "Samuel J. Reader. July 26, 1855." The artist drew many Kansas territorial and Civil War scenes.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Daily life; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Indianola, Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Land claims; Objects; Photographs and Illustrations; Reader, Samuel James; Settlement; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Squatters


Quilt, New England Emigrant Aid Company
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855
Fragment of comforter made by women from the Boston-based New England Emigrant Aid Society. The comforter was sold at a charity raffle in Lawrence in 1855. Proceeds were given to free-state settlers. The fabric is believed to have been taken from Revolutionary War uniforms. Dr. Sylvester B. Prentiss purchased the comforter, which was later divided into sections and distributed among his family members.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Emigrant aid companies; Free state; Free state cause; House furnishings; Immigration and early settlement; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Objects; Prentiss, S.B.


Abbott Sword
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855
Major James B. Abbott acquired this Model 1840 Noncommissioned Officer's sword in 1855. He carried it through the territorial period.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Border disputes and warfare; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Militia; Objects; Swords and daggers; Weapons (see also Guns)


John Brown Surveyor's Compass
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855
While in Kansas John Brown was employed as a surveyor, an occupation which allowed him to move around freely to locate and observe proslavery camps. This compass was made by Phelps and Gurley of Troy, New York.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Free state supporters; New York; Objects; Phelps and Gurley; Surveyors


John Brown portrait
Authors: Ruggles, Quartus
Date: 1855-1859
John Brown portrait by Quartus Ruggles, 1889. Brown was an abolitionist who came to Kansas in 1855. Although in the territory for only about three years, he was involved in several skirmishes and helped free some Missouri slaves. Brown was hanged for treason on December 2, 1859 for attempting to overtake the U.S. arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Objects; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Ruggles, Quartus; Slavery


Portrait, Andrew H. Reeder
Authors: Hall, Cyrenius
Date: 1855
Portrait of Andrew H. Reeder, first territorial governor. In 1855 Reeder was removed from office by President Pierce and was forced to leave Kansas when threatened by a pro-slavery grand jury. He escaped with the help of Thomas and Julia Stinson, who dressed him in women's clothing. Later, Reeder disguised himself as a woodcutter (as depicted in this painting) and escaped via a steamer on the Missouri River. Artist Cyrenius Hall painted this portrait in 1880.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Border disputes and warfare; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Objects; Proslavery activities; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Stinson, Julia; Stinson, Thomas N.; Violence


Immigrant's Violin
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855
James Limerick brought this violin from Kentucky to Kansas Territory in 1855. Limerick played the violin around campsites in the evenings. The Limerick family settled at Rock Creek in Pottawatomie County, near the James Darnell family whom they met on the trail. Limerick eventually gave the violin to the Darnells.

Keywords: Darnell, James; Entertainment; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Irish; Limerick, James; Music; Objects; Pottawatomie County, Kansas Territory; Settlement


"Southern Rights" flag
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 21, 1856
Pro-slavery forces carried this flag while attacking the anti-slavery stronghold of Lawrence. Sheriff Samuel Jones led the group in sacking the town on May 21, 1856. A group of South Carolinians known as the Palmetto Guards participated in the attack, and flew their "Southern Rights" flag over the "Herald of Freedom" newspaper offices and the Free State Hotel before destroying the buildings.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Flags and banners; Free State Hotel; Herald of Freedom; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Objects; Palmetto Guards; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; South Carolina; Violence


Fremont Campaign Ribbon
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 30, 1856
Kansas was a major issue in the 1856 presidential election. John C. Fremont was the candidate of the newly formed Republican Party, which wanted Kansas admitted as a free state. This silk ribbon is printed with an image of Fremont, and the text, "Let Freedom Conquer! . . . For President, John C. Fremont, of California. Vice President, Wm. L. Dayton of New Jersey. Young Men's Convention, Dayton, O. July 30th, 1856."

Keywords: Dayton, William Lewis; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Objects; Ohio; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Painting, Directing John Brown to the Free State Camp
Authors: Reader, Samuel James
Date: August 3, 1856
Painting of John Brown being led to a Free State camp by Samuel Reader. John Brown disguised himself as a surveyor to monitor the activites of proslavery forces in the Kansas Territory. Here, the artist depicts himself leading Brown to a camp on Pony Creek in Brown County on August 3, 1856.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Brown County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state; Free state activities; Objects; Reader, Samuel James; Surveyors


Titus Sword
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Three months after the sack of Lawrence, the Free State Milita attacked the pro-slavery stronghold of Fort Titus. Free State forces were lead by Colonel James A. Harvey. Named after Colonel Henry T. Titus, a local pro-slavery commander, Fort Titus actually was a cabin located in Lecompton. After the Free State victory on August 16th, 1856, Colonel Titus surrendered this sword to Colonel Harvey.

Keywords: Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Harvey, James A.; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Objects; Swords and daggers; Titus, Henry Theodore; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


Painting, Battle of Hickory Point
Authors: Reader, Samuel James
Date: September 13, 1856
Painting by Samuel Reader depicting the Battle of Hickory Point. Reader, an early settler of Shawnee County, was a member of a volunteer Free State company. On September 13, 1856, General James Lane heard that proslavery men were committing outrages in the town of Grasshopper Falls (Valley Falls). Lane marched to Ozawkie and recruited Free State settlers. Shortly thereafter, he heard that the proslavery forces were at Hickory Point, north of Oskaloosa, and so redirected his men there. The proslavery forces, which included about 40 South Carolinians, were under the command of Captain H. A. Lowe. According to Reader's accounts, only one Free State man was injured, but between 5-6 proslavery men were killed when these forces collided.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Battles; Border disputes and warfare; Free state; Hickory Point, Battle of; Jefferson County, Kansas Territory; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lowe, H. A.; Objects; Reader, Samuel James; South Carolina; Violence


Buffum Tombstone
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Sept. 17, 1856
Tombstone of David C. Buffum, a free-stater from Massachusetts who was killed by the pro-slavery Kickapoo Rangers on Sept. 17, 1856. Buffum was plowing a field on his farm near Lawrence when the Rangers (including Henry Titus and Sheriff Samuel Jones) stole his horse and shot him. Before he died, Buffum was heard to express the sentiments chiseled on his tombstone: "I am willing to die for the cause of Freedom in Kansas."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Buffum, David C.; Casualties; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Free state perspective; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Kickapoo Rangers (militia); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; Objects; Proslavery activities; Titus, Henry Theodore; Tombstones; Violence; Violent deaths


Reeder Dagger
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Many free-state leaders were charged with treason by the pro-slavery legislature in May 1856. Former territorial governor Andrew Reeder escaped arrest by leaving Kansas disguised as a woodcutter. Reeder carried this dagger for defense when he fled the territory.

Keywords: Free state cause; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Pawnee/Shawnee Mission; Objects; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Swords and daggers; Treason; Weapons (see also Guns)


James Lane Telescope
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855-1857
Spyglass used by James Lane and other free-state leaders of Lawrence in observing the movements of Missourians.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Free state activities; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Objects


Admit Me Free Flag
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
In 1856 this flag was used in a rally at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for Republican presidential nominee John C. Fremont. The oversized 34th star and the words, "Admit Me Free" in the canton of the flag are in support of Kansas admittance as a free state.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Flags and banners; Free state; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Objects; Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


Abbott Howitzer
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Major James Burnett Abbott traveled east to raise funds and purchase arms for the free-state cause. In New York Abbott met Frederick Law Olmsted, who assisted in raising funds for the howitzer from the Ames Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts. The howitzer was taken to Lawrence, where it was captured by proslavery forces on May 21, 1856. It was recaptured at Fort Titus on August 16, 1856. Afterwards the howitzer was used in Linn County and by James H. Lane's brigade during the Civil War.

Keywords: Abbott howitzer; Abbott, James Burnett; Ames Manufacturing Company; Border disputes and warfare; Cannons; Civil war; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; Objects; Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


"God Save Kansas" Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Banner used in New Hampshire during the 1856 presidential campaign, illustrating the national interest in Kansas territorial affairs. Fremont/Dayton banner was made of silk and used at Lancaster, N.H. Inscribed "God Save Kansas" and "From the ladies of Lancaster to Fremont Club No. 244."

Keywords: Dayton, William Lewis; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Flags and banners; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; New Hampshire; Objects; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


John Brown Sword
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
The sword is believed to have been brought to Kansas Territory from Ohio by John Brown in 1856. That year, pro-slavery forces destroyed the homes of John Brown's sons in Franklin County. While leaving the state, the Brown family camped at the home of Otis Potter, near Lawrence. In gratitude, the Browns presented this sword to Potter.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Free state; Free state cause; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Objects; Ohio; Potter, Otis; Swords and daggers; Weapons (see also Guns)


Quindaro Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856-1861
Walnut desk used by abolitionist Fielding Johnson in Quindaro, Kansas. The word "Quindaro" is painted on the back of the desk. The town of Quindaro was settled by anti-slavery activists. Johnson, a merchant and agent to the Delaware Indians, was known to aid fugitive slaves.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Daily life; Delaware Indians; Fugitive slaves; Furniture; House furnishings; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Johnson, Fielding; Merchants; Objects; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Settlement; Underground railroad; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Pro-slavery man's musket
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Flintlock musket carried by J. H. Meyer in 1856, while a member of the pro-slavery Kansas Terriorial Militia.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Firearms; Guns; Meyer, J. H.; Militia; Objects; Proslavery activities; Proslavery perspective; Weapons (see also Guns)


George Clarke Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Desk brought to the Kansas Territory in 1855 by George Clarke, who was a Pottwatomie Indian agent and slave holder. Clarke was a notorious proslavery leader during the border war period. He was suspected of killing a free state man, Thomas W. Barber of Lawrence in 1855. While Clarke was sitting at this desk in his Lecompton home in 1856, a shot was fired at him. He was uninjured, but the bullet put a hole in his desk. Clarke was driven out of the territory in 1858.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; House furnishings; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Quilt from Kentucky
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1857
Whitework quilt brought to Kansas from Kentucky in 1857. The bedcover dates from 1840 to 1850, and is made of plain white cotton fabric. The designs are the result of quilting and extra stuffing which gives a relief effect. Jeremiah King brought the quilt to Kansas, settling in Wyandotte County.

Keywords: Daily life; House furnishings; Immigration and early settlement; Kentucky; King, Jeremiah; Objects; Settlement; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Lombard Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
Students of Lombard College at Galesburg, Illinois, presented this banner to Abraham Lincoln on October 7, 1858. Lincoln's fifth debate with Stephen A. Douglas was held at Galesburg that evening. Lincoln later presented the banner to Mark W. Delahay of Leavenworth, who was related to Lincoln by marriage. Delahay used the banner in the 1860 presidential election.

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Elections; Flags and banners; Illinois; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lombard College; Objects


Leslie's Illustrated, Panoramic View of Lecompton
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: December 25, 1858
Illustration from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper depicting panoramic view of Lecompton. Scene includes steamboats on the Kansas River and immigrant wagons. Captioned, "City of Lecompton, Territorial Capital of Kansas."

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Immigration and early settlement; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Objects; Periodical illustrations; Photographs and Illustrations; Settlement


Leslie's Illustrated, Stories of Kansas Cities
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
Article from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, December 25, 1858. Entitled "The Cities of Kansas," it includes accounts of Lawrence, Leavenworth, Lecompton, and Topeka.

Keywords: Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Objects; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Leslie's Illustrated, Ship of the Plains at Sea.
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
Illustration from an unknown publication, probably Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. The scene depicts wagons crossing the prairies.

Keywords: Commerce; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Objects; Periodical illustrations; Photographs and Illustrations; Settlement; Transportation


John Brown pike
Authors: Collins and Company
Date: October 18, 1859
Pike used by slaves at the insurrection planned by John Brown at the U.S. arsenal in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, October 18, 1859. Armed with pikes and guns, Brown's army, primarily slaves, took hostages from the community and took over the arsenal. Brown's army was overwhelmed by U.S. troops led by Colonel Robert E. Lee. Brown was tried and hanged for treason on December 2, 1859.

Keywords: Blair, Charles; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Collinsville, Connecticut; Courts; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Objects; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Swords and daggers; United States Government; Violence; Violent deaths; Weapons (see also Guns)


John Brown "Parallels" Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: January, 1859
This secretary was used in the home of Augustus Wattles at Moneka, Linn County. Family tradition holds that John Brown, while visiting Wattles in January, 1859, wrote his "Parallels" defense at this desk. The tradition further relates that the Wattles children watched Brown as he wrote, peering through cracks in the floor above. To hide his own location and to protect Wattles from retaliation, Brown indicated the "Parallels" were written at Trading Post instead of at Moneka. In this document Brown compares the authorities' hunt for him (for liberating Missouri slaves) to the lack of a search for the perpetrators of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre.

Keywords: Antislavery; Brown, John, 1800-1859; House furnishings; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Objects; Underground railroad; Wattles, Augustus


Tintype of African American woman
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1860
Tintype of unidentified African American woman, circa 1860. This photo was passed down through generations of the Platt family. Jireh Platt was an active abolitionist in Mendon, Illinois. His sons Enoch and Luther, members of the Beecher Bible and Rifle Colony, settled in Wabaunsee County where they operated a station on the Underground Railroad. The Platts may have helped this woman escape to freedom. The fact that she is wearing a wedding ring is significant, as slaves weren't legally allowed to marry.

Keywords: Abolitionists; African Americans; Beecher Bible and Rifle Colony; Fugitive slaves; New Haven, Connecticut; Objects; Photographs and Illustrations; Platt, Enoch; Platt, Jireh; Platt, Luther H.; Underground railroad; Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory


Bowie Knife
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1861
Knife made in a blacksmith shop operated by James Howell near Clay, Arkansas, for the purpose of fighting Kansans. Manufactured in 1861, it was used in the Civil War battles of Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove in Arkansas, and Wilson's Creek and Price's Raid in Missouri. Abolitionists and freestaters stereotyped pro-slavery defenders as always carrying Bowie knives. Indeed, Benjamin Stringfellow advised fellow slavery supporters in 1855 to "enter every election district in Kansas . . . and vote at the point of the bowie knife and the revolver.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border disputes and warfare; Bowie knife; Civil war; Howell, James; Missouri; Objects; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Swords and daggers; Violence


Lane Lithograph
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1861
Lithograph of James Henry Lane, probably done shortly after he became a United States Senator.

Keywords: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Objects; Photographs and Illustrations


J.W.H. Golden Rifle
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1862
Rifle made by J.W.H. Golden while superintendent of the Fort Leavenworth Arsenal, 1862. Golden settled in Leavenworth in October, 1854 and was shot by border ruffians near Tonganoxie on September 6, 1856. The bullet remained in his throat until his death in 1894.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Firearms; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Golden, J.W.H.; Guns; Objects; Weapons (see also Guns)


Harper's Weekly, Exoduster Illustrations
Authors: Worrall, Henry
Date: July 5, 1879
Illustrations from Harper's Weekly magazine depicting Exodusters. As life in the South worsened for Blacks after the Civil War, many left for more promising lands. Thousands came to Kansas in a great exodus (hence the name "Exodusters") during the 1870s, attracted by the state's free-state reputation established during the territorial era. These three illustrations are captioned, "The Colored Exodus - - Scenes at Topeka, Kansas - - From Sketches by H. Worrall." Worrall was an early Kansas artist.

Keywords: African Americans; Exodusters; Immigration and early settlement; Objects; Periodical illustrations; Photographs and Illustrations; Settlement; Topeka, Kansas; Worrall, Henry


Sculpture of Slave Auction Block
Authors: Douglas, Frederick I.
Date: 1920-1927
Carved figure inside a glass bottle, depicting a slave auction. Figure was carved by Frederick I. Douglas to represent a story passed down by his father, Thomas O. Douglas, who had been sold in a similar manner in Tennessee. Thomas Douglas was an Exoduster who settled in Wabaunsee County in 1879. His son Frederick's carvings won ribbons when exhibited at a Topeka fair in 1927.

Keywords: African Americans; Art; Artist; Douglas, Frederick I.; Douglas, Thomas Oliver; Exodusters; Objects; Slave auctions; Slavery; Slaves; Tennessee


Doy Rifle
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
Dr. John Doy used this Sharps rifle fighting border disputes in Franklin County and at Ft. Titus. In Jan. 1859, Doy was captured near Lawrence by pro-slavery Missouri forces and charged with aiding in the abduction of fugitive slaves. For six months Doy was held in a St. Joseph, MO, jail. Doy was rescued by ten of his free-state friends, lead by Major James Abbott. Engraved in the rifle's stock is the phase, "Successful Agent of the Irrepressible Conflict."

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Antislavery; Border disputes and warfare; Doy, John; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Objects; Sharps rifles; St. Joseph, Missouri; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


Educational globe from Delaware Baptist Mission
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1837-1867
Globe made by the Halbrook School Apparatus Company and used in he Delaware Baptist Mission in Wyandotte County, near Edwardsville, Kansas. The Delaware Indians came to Kansas in the mid-1830s, followed by the missionaries who came to educate and convert them to Christianity. The mission was founded by Ira D. Blanchard in 1837 and later run by John G. Pratt.

Keywords: Baptists; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Delaware Indians; Halbrook School Apparatus Company; Missionaries; Objects; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Schools; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Portrait, Stephen Douglas
Authors: Lussier, Louis
Date: 
Portrait of Stephen Douglas by Louis Lussier. Douglas helped write the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which called for the repeal of the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Kansas and Nebraska were opened up for settlement but the people living there, not the national government, would determine whether these states would be free or slave. Douglas had been a member of Congress and a United States Senator from Illinois from 1847 until his death in 1861. He ran for President, unsuccessfully, against Abraham Lincoln in 1860.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lussier, Louis; Objects; Popular sovereignty


Leslie's Illustrated, Lecompton and Lawrence
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: Dec. 25th, 1858
Brief descriptions of territorial towns Lawrence and Lecompton, published in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly Newspaper in 1858. The article mentions constuction of a state capital in Lecompton and the destruction of the Free State Hotel in Lawrence.

Keywords: Free State Hotel; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Objects; Periodical illustrations; Photographs and Illustrations; Settlement


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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