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37 results for National politics:
Resolutions, Legislature of South Carolina, House and Senate [1849]
Authors: South Carolina, House of Representatives
Date: February 12, 1849
This Resolution, approved by both the House and Senate of South Carolina in 1849, resolved that the principles of the Wilmot Proviso would not be applied to the recently acquired Mexican territory. The Wilmot Proviso, passed in the U. S. House of Representatives in 1846 and 1847, resolved that, upon the acquisition of the Mexican territory, "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of said territory, except for crime, whereof the party shall first be duly convicted." The Wilmot Proviso was never passed in the U. S. Senate.

Keywords: Mexican territory; Mexico, Republic of; National politics; Proslavery; Slavery; South Carolina; Wilmot Proviso, 1846


Letter, Sarah [presumably Sarah T. D. Lawrence] to My Dear Mrs. [William B.] Stowe
Authors: Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911
Date: January 9 1851
This letter, written by Sarah [presumably would be Sarah T.D. Lawrence, Charles Robinson's future wife] from Belchertown, MA, to Mrs. William B. Stowe, in West Brookfield, MA, contains excerpts of a letter written by Charles Robinson to Sarah. Robinson described his conditions of imprisonment in California (where he had traveled prior to settling in Kansas); he had been jailed for supporting squatter's rights and anti-slavery causes. He makes reference to a Dr. J.G. Holland, who had been a friend and colleague of his at home in Massachusetts.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; California; Massachusetts; National politics; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Squatter sovereignty


Letter, S. H. W. to Dear Bro Isaac [Goodnow]
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: June 15, 1855
S. H. W. wrote from New England to Isaac Goodnow in Kansas Territory, reporting on the proceedings of the Philadelphia National Kansas Nebraska Convention, an organization that he described as "Pro Slavery to the Back Bone!". He implored that New Englanders of Kansas have "Back Bone", and fight against slavery. The author further narrated "the north is uniting. The plot thickens, and the struggle comes", and disparaged President Pierce's administration, hoping for an anti-slavery one in the future. The letter includes a short note from Mrs. S. H. W., which exclaimed at Ellen Goodnow's traveling to Kansas alone.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; National politics; Pierce administration; Proslavery supporters; Women


Letter, Robert Allyn to Bro. & Sis. Goodnow [Isaac and Ellen Goodnow]
Authors: Allyn, Robert
Date: October 11, 1855
Robert Allyn wrote from Providence, Rhode Island, to his friends Isaac and Ellen Goodnow in Kansas Territory. Allyn, like Goodnow an educator, updated the couple on the construction of a new local Academy. He also reacted to news he had heard of political conditions in K.T., having found that "the papers are full of dreadful things about you horrid abolitionists in Kanzas", and asking him, "How do you contrive to live under the Missouri laws?" Showing himself to be a staunch Abolitionist as well, Allyn provides his own strong opinions and insights regarding the Kansas troubles. Allyn also advised that "getting up a few. . .free schools" would prompt a great rush of emigration from the Northern States to the Territory

Keywords: Abolitionists; Allyn, Robert; Antislavery; Education; Free state supporters; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Missourians; National politics; Newspapers; Pierce administration


Pamphlet, Miscellaneous State Legislative Resolutions
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855-1856
Includes Resolutions from various State Legislatures concerning the extension of slavery into Kansas Territory, disturbances in Kansas Territory, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the admission of Kansas into the Union as a state.

Keywords: Iowa; Kansas Nebraska Act; Legal documents; Maine; Massachusetts; National politics; New Hampshire; Ohio; Rhode Island; Slavery; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; Violence


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: February 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother Edwin Parrott in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus described his experiences mixing his social engagements with politics, having to navigate through discussions with members of different parties. He mentioned the distrust he had for certain acquaintances that were also active in the government, and seemed frustrated by his only modestly successful attempts to discuss the Kansas question with them.

Keywords: Iverson, Alfred; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Medill, William; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Handbill advertizement for Concert in Honor of Governor Charles Robinson
Authors: Willey, Prof. G.F.
Date: June 5, 1856
This handbill advertised a concert of the Glee Class and Fitchburg Cornet Band, given "in honor of His Excellency Charles Robinson, Governor of Kansas." Each person in attendance would receive an original piece of music composed by Andrew Whitney, entitled "Gov. Robinson's Polka," in honor of Gov. Robinson.

Keywords: Entertainment; Fitchburg, Massachusetts; Free state government; Massachusetts; Music; National politics; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Whitney, Andrew


Letter, Milton M. Powers to Dear Friend, Cyrus K. Holliday
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: June 7, 1856
Milton M. Powers, Deputy Clerk of Court in Columbus, Ohio wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, Free State leader and founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Powers had read of Holliday's activities in northern newspapers. A presentation of the Wrongs of Kansas, emphasizing Andrew H. Reeder and Samuel N. Wood's experiences, had emotionally motivated Powers to write and assure Holliday of his support. Once a Jeffersonian Democrat, but convicted that the party had abandoned its principles, Powers had become a Republican. He stated that the entire nation was attuned to events in Kansas Territory, and he believed that these events would have intense impact on the nation's future.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Columbus, Ohio; Democratic Party (U.S.); Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; National politics; Newspapers; Powers, Milton M.; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter draft, unsigned [Hiram Hill] to S. N. Simpson
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: June 17, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts to Samuel Simpson in Kansas Territory, responding to the news of recent violence there. Hill reported that the public was excited over the Kansas troubles and the Kansas question in Congress. Hill demonstrated his resolve in supporting the free state cause, stating that "Slavery has got us so close in her embrase [sic] that it will take a mighty struggle to throw her off if we cannot change our government in no other way than by Revolution I don't care how soon it comes". He also responded to Simpson's reports regarding the construction of his home in KT, trouble with delinquent tenants, and the market for land sales.

Keywords: Free state support; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; National politics; Real estate investment; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town lots; Whitney, Thaddeus L.


Letter draft, unsigned [Hiram Hill] to S. N. Simpson
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: July 12, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to Samuel Simpson in Kansas Territory, suggesting to him at length that he write more slowly and clearly as Hill was having trouble deciphering his news regarding West Lawrence. Hill told Simpson that the people of his area were aroused enough by the continuing accounts of border ruffian violence that they called a meeting and raised $300 for Kansas. He believed that the future of the situation rested with the upcoming presidential election, "free Kansas free speech & free press & Fremont", to keep Congress from passing a "Compromises" bill with slavery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Free state supporters; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Hill, Hiram; Kansas Territory; National politics; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Skirmishing


Letter draft, unsigned [Hiram Hill] to S. G. How
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: July 26, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to S. G. How, of the "Kansas Committee for Receiving and Dispersing" funds. Hill inquired how and in what manner any money sent to Kansas would be applied: "I have some money in my hand and we can rais [sic] more if we can have any prospect of its getting to Kansas and doing any good".

Keywords: Free state supporters; Hill, Hiram; Kansas Territory; Money; National politics


Letter, Samuel Whitcomb to Respected & Dear Sir [Honorable G. Smith]
Authors: Whitcomb, Samuel
Date: August 30, 1856
This letter, written in Springfield by Samuel Whitcomb, is addressed to the Honorable G. Smith of Peterborg, New York. It is a passionate piece of correspondence that discusses slavery and liberty, demonstrating the conviction of this free-soil advocate. Whitcomb also expressed his frustration that the federal government was not more supportive of the free state cause in Kansas Territory, as well as his fear that the war was destined to spread out from Kansas.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Congress (See United States. Congress); Free state cause; National politics; Pierce administration; Sectionalism (United States); United States Government; United States. Army; United States. Congress; Whitcomb, Samuel


Letter, O. [Owen] C. Brown to My Dear Sir
Authors: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: November 12, 1856
Brown wrote Samuel Adair in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory from Utica, New York. He reported that he had spoken to ten different groups about needs in Kansas. He reported that Mr. Arny of the National Kansas Committee planned to visit Osawatomie and promised that the people there would get their fair share of aid. He asked Adair a number of questions about the situation there including questions about pro-slavery settlers. He discussed elections and the Know Nothing party.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Elections; Free state support; Know Nothing Party; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); National Kansas Committee; National politics; New York; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Relief; Utica, New York


Letter, H. B. Hurd to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Hurd, H. B.
Date: November 14, 1856
H. B. Hurd was secretary of the National Kansas Committee, and he wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson from the committee's office in Chicago. The main focus of the letter revolves around Higginson's plan of operation to garner support from free state governors. Hurd offered advice about which governors to approach first, also stating his opinion on various related matters. Included in the letter was another sheet, outlining Higginson's "Points to be suggested to the Executives of the States." The back of this sheet has some other notes and doodling.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hurd, H. B.; National Kansas Committee; National politics; United States Government


Pamphlet, "The Coming Struggle: or, Shall Kansas Be a Free or Slave State?"
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This pamphlet, authored anonymously by "One of the People" directs the question "Slavery or Liberty?" primarily to a Northern audience. The context of the argument supports Kansas achieving status as a free state, though it pointedly states that "the Free States desire not to control the internal arrangements of their sister States; but while they are willing that State rights should be respected, they will not submit to the nationalization of Slavery".

Keywords: Catholic Church; Democratic Party (U.S.); Missouri compromise; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Secession; Sectionalism (United States); Slavery


Letter, B. Darrach to Rev. S. L. Adair
Authors: Darrach, Barstow
Date: January 8, 1857
Darrach at New York Hospital commented on events at the national level and the prospect of little support for the free state cause from Congress or the President. He reported that John Brown was in New York speaking about Kansas and trying to raise some funds and other support.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Darrach, Barstow; Free state perspective; National politics; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869


Letter, O. [Owen] C. Brown to My dear Brother [Samuel Adair]
Authors: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: January 21, 1857
O. C. Brown wrote from Utica, New York, to Samuel Adair, in Osawatomie, KansasTerritory. He wrote about speaking engagements on behalf of Kansas. He mentioned Gov. Geary and President Pierce.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Free state support; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); National politics; New York; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Relief; Utica, New York


Letter, S .F. Burdick to Dear Brother [Oscar E. Learnard]
Authors: Burdick, S.F.
Date: April 12, 1857
S. F. Burdick, in this transcribed version of his letter to Oscar Learnard, wrote from Winooski, Vermont. Burdick communicated his feelings regarding recent political events in Kansas Territory, condemning President Buchanan's replacement of Governor Geary with the "Southern appointment" Robert Walker. He also advised Learnard to either "submit to slavery or fight", and saw no other alternative solution to the problem, though later he cautioned to only fight if first attacked. Burdick added that he wished to come to Kansas Territory, in spite of the troubles, but was held back by his wife's wishes.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Burdick, S.F.; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; National politics; Vermont; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar E. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: September 22, 1857
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. Learnard told Oscar of his desire to move the rest of the family to Kansas Territory, if only at least to see his "much praised and extolled land." He also commented on the recent slowing of the economy, and gave Oscar business advice. Throughout S.T. Learnard's letter, his strong opposition to slavery in Kansas is made clear.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Crops; Economic conditions; Herald of Freedom; Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; National politics; Vermont


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dr Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 10, 1857
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding recent dramatic political events. Marcus referred to Democrat Stephen Douglas' "breaking" with President Buchanan. Both men supported popular sovereignty in Kansas, as well as the solidarity of the Union. However, the President, unwilling to override the work of what he considered a legitimate Lecompton Constitutional Convention or to cancel a local election result, asked Congress to approve the Lecompton Constitution, make Kansas momentarily a slave state, and thus enable the people there to make any new constitution they wished. But Douglas, outraged by such a distortion of his vision of popular sovereignty , broke with Buchanan and joined with the Republicans to defeat the admission of Kansas.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Concurrent Resolutions, New York State Senate, Relative to Territorial Legislation
Authors: New York State Senate
Date: January 5, 1858
This resolution proposes guidelines for the creation of a constitution in Kansas Territory, stating that any adopted constitution must not conflict with laws of the "general government" [United States federal government], but also that it must be fairly approved by the voters of the territory and not imposed upon them by any governing body.

Keywords: Constitutions; Kansas Territory. Legislature; National politics; New York; New York State Senate; Popular sovereignty; United States Government


Letter, [S. F.] Burdick to Dear Brother, Oscar [Learnard]
Authors: Burdick, S.F.
Date: January 6, 1858
S. F. Burdick, referring to his friend, Oscar Learnard, as "brother", wrote to him from Learnard's home state of Vermont. Burdick asked Learnard if there was anything he might do "to advance the cause of liberty and justice", and told him that he had heard of troubles at Fort Scott, referring to an incident taking place on December 17, 1857, when free state men, who had been displaced from their claims in 1856, returned to take possession of them again. Firing was done on both sides, though no one was killed or arrested.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Burdick, S.F.; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Kansas Nebraska Act; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Missourians; National politics; Popular sovereignty


Concurrent Resolutions, New York State Senate, Relative to a Constitution for Kansas
Authors: New York State Senate
Date: January 6, 1858
This resolution proposed to support the creation, by peaceful and just electoral means, of a state constitution in the Kansas Territory. The resolution also suggested that if a constitution could be approved by the voters of the Kansas Territory, that the U. S. Congress accept the territory as a state.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Constitutions; Elections; National politics; New York; New York State Senate; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Violence


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: January 14, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, VT, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. The author mentioned various friends and relatives, several of whom had traveled to and settled in Kansas Territory. He reiterated his desire to move his family to Kansas Territory as well. S.T. also communicated his disgust with the Democrats, who "are chained to the car of slavery and are ready to do any dirty work the slave power wish them to do."

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Daily life; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Emigration and immigration; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; National politics; Vermont; Weather


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: January 19, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. S.T. commented on a proposition made to him by Oscar concerning his taking over Oscar's business in Kansas while Oscar himself would go West for gold mining. Oscar's father advised against this, and made other suggestions as to how his own accounts, as well as his son's, could be managed profitably. S. T. also asked about the state of the Territorial Legislature, dubbed the Border Ruffians "imps of darkness," and encouraged Oscar to continue the fight for liberty.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Business enterprises; Gold mines and mining; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; National politics; Real estate investment


Letter, J. Thompson to My Dear [James W.] Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: January 29, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to James W. Denver from the U. S. Department of the Interior regarding the current debate over the Lecompton Constitution. Thompson advised Denver to stand his ground in support of it, regardless of what the President might say; "to turn aside now is downright weakness" and a show of cowardice. Thompson's opinion was that a Territorial decision to abolish slavery would be against the Dred Scott decision, and therefore unconstitutional.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; Dred Scott decision; Elmore, Rush; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Proslavery perspective; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 3, 1858
Amos Lawrence wrote from Boston to Charles Robinson in Kansas Territory, regarding questionable ratification of the Lecompton Constitution. Lawrence advised that the best course of action to take was to "rid the territory of all traitors to the popular right", though such action should take place only if it could "avoid open hostilities altogether."

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Thos. A Hendricks to Dear Sir [Gov. James W. Denver]
Authors: Hendricks, Thomas A.
Date: April 3, 1858
Thomas Hendricks wrote from Washington D. C. to Governor James Denver in Lecompton, Kansas Territory, providing his reaction to news of recent events in Kansas Territory. Hendricks referred to James Lane's duel challenge to Denver, and advised Denver to "give him a thrashing" should he have trouble with Lane again. Hendricks expressed his wish that the "Kansas question" should be resolved as soon as possible, and he speculated on the outcome of the bill in Congress which proposed the recognition of the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Brindle, William; Crittenden Amendment; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; United States. Congress


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: June 9, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. S.T. mentioned his recent trip to Illinois and his efforts to obtain land warrants. He also requested that Oscar send him word on the status of his crops and mill, as his own friends were urging him to stay in business in Vermont. The author also referred to the upcoming August vote in which the English Bill, which essentially re-submitted the once-rejected proslavey Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory, would be approved or rejected by popular sovereignty.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Business enterprises; Daily life; English Bill; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Vermont


Pamphlet, Report of the Committee on Federal Relations Relative to the Admission of Kansas Into the Federal Union
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
This pamphlet includes the Resolutions proposed by the Texas Legislature's "Committee on Federal Relations relative to the Admission of Kansas into the Federal Union", produced in response to the Congressional debate whether or not to adopt Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. This document proposed that Kansas be adopted into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution as it was, supporting slavery or not, and have Kansans amend the document later as necessary. The intention of the Texas Legislature was to remove the Kansas question from the national platform, for they feared that Congressmen from Northern States, acting in their own interests, would never vote to adopt another proslavery territory into statehood.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus told his brother of his experience in Washington: "awfully dull, nothing like an exciting party or an interesting debate thus far". He discussed to his social life and upcoming trips to Cuba, and also to Boston to meet with the Directors of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Marcus did elaborate on one message that had been clearly communicated to him in the House: that opponents of the "Lecompton party" were not encouraged to unite.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh Boyle; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; United States. Congress. House; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Letter, E. C. Andreas to Friend [William] Goodnow
Authors: Andreas, E.C.
Date: January 25, 1859
E. C. Andreas wrote from New England to his friend William Goodnow in Kansas Territory. Andreas reacted to news he had heard regarding "commotion" in the Territory caused by "modern Democrats" and border ruffians, calling them "far worse than fever & ague." He communicated the opinion that there was little hope for Kansas to be admitted to the Union under the current Congress and Administration. Andreas also mentioned Goodnow's management of his land titles.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Buchanan administration; Crops; Democratic Party (U.S.); Goodnow, William E.; National politics; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas)


Letter, [Marc Parrott] to Dr. Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: c. 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to his brother, Edwin Parrott, of Ohio. Marcus inquired about the "mixed politics" he had heard about in Ohio. He also remarked that he anticipated being a candidate for Congress, and expressed his interest in visiting Pike's Peak. Marcus added that he would leave the following morning for Wyandotte in order to attend the Constitutional Convention there, and projected that there would be trouble since the Republicans held a heavy majority.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Free State Party; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pikes Peak, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to the New York Tribune (Copy No. 1)
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: August 24, 1860
This copy was titled "Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas, The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology!" Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, was trying to dispel information coming from Leavenworth that reported that conditions in Kansas were being exaggerated. He felt efforts to deny "the present deplorable condition of things" were motivated by economic concerns. Hyatt wrote that they suffered because of the drought, not their own actions, and that the free North should aid them. The letter was well written and contained a great deal of emotional rhetoric. The letter was copied (by hand) by W. F. M. Arny. The last page of the letter elaborated on its origins.

Keywords: Droughts; Economic conditions; Famines; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Herald; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; National politics; New York Tribune; Newspapers; Relief; Relief funds


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1860
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the political situation there. Marcus suspected that an organization existed, on the part of Virginia and Maryland, to block the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, and stated that, if the national situation did not better itself, that he had "no doubt that he [Lincoln] will sacrifice his life" improving it. He added that economic conditions were poor, and that many Congressmen were left unpaid.

Keywords: Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Economic conditions; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Secession; Washington, D.C.


Circular, Aid to Kansas
Authors: Ladies' Kansas Aid Society of Richmond
Date: c. 1860
This circular, issued by the Ladies' Kansas Aid Society of Richmond, announces the placement of a contribution box in town, with proceeds supporting the "suffering friends of Freedom in Kansas" in their fight against the "outrages of the Border Ruffians." The Aid Society is most likely based in a New England town named Richmond, though the exact location is unknown.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Circulars; Eddy, Jennie; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Free state support; Free state supporters; Howells, Mary A.; Ladies' Kansas Aid Society of Richmond; National politics; Relief; Vanderburg, Lydia A.


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1861
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C. to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Ohio. Marcus began his letter berating his brother for his inconsistent correspondence; he himself, though very busy, managed to write Edwin regularly. Marcus also voiced his frustration with Congress, declaring this to be his last week as a Delegate, and predicted that both Republicans' and Democrats' stubbornness would cause the country to permanently divide. Kansas would become a state on January 29, only three days later.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Blair, Frank; Brown, Thomas; Democratic Party (U.S.); National politics; Ohio; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Secession; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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