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45 results for Montgomery, James, 1814-1871:
Commission, James Montgomery, captain
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: September 16, 1857
This printed commission, issued from the "Head-Quarters Kansas Volunteers, For the Protection of the Ballot-Box," was given to James Montgomery and signed by J.H. Lane and M. F. Conway, adjutant general, on September 16, 1857. Montgomery was commissioned captain of the "Little Sugar Creek Company." This would have been specifically for the territorial election, October 5, 1857.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Elections; Free state militia; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Free state supporters; Kansas Volunteers; Kansas Volunteers for the Protection of the Ballot Box; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Voting; Voting fraud (see also Contested elections)


Letter, S.C.S. [most likely Samuel C. Smith] to "Doctor" [Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: January 11, 1858
This letter, dated Lawrence, January 11, 1858, most likely from Samuel C. Smith, mentions many of the Free State Party's main actors and issues at this critical time in Kansas politics. He described the activities of the Legislature, which assembled in Lawrence in January, and devotes considerable attention to the machinations of the "villain" Jim Lane.

Keywords: Allen, Lyman; Babcock, Carmi William; Conway, Martin Franklin; Deitzler, George W.; Free State Party; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Larzalere, Alfred; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Railroad companies; Railroad legislation; Railroad promotion; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Temperance movement; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Vaughan, Champion


Letter, Your devoted Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: January 24, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego described how, since the shelter being built around the mill equipment was not yet complete, the wind and rain interfered with their ability to work. Though the work was hard, he favored the milling business over other means toward income. Trego responded to a newspaper article from the Rock Island Advertiser that his wife had sent him, deeming their coverage of the Kansas troubles "sensational." He expected that Fort Scott would soon be destroyed by free state militiamen, as "Bourbon County Bandits" (proslavery supporters) had been harassing extensively free state supporters in the area. Despite all this disorder, the development prospects of Mound City, in Linn County, appeared favorable.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Business enterprises; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Postal service; Proslavery activities; Railroads; Rock Island Advertiser; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Telegraph; Town development; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Weather


Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear Brother"
Authors: Anderson, J. G.
Date: February 17, 1858
From "Camp near Luella K.T." on February 17, 1858, J. G. Anderson wrote to his brother regarding the "considerable excitement" that had recently resulted after a free state man was robbed in Fort Scott. Two companies of "Kansas Militia" were called out to arrest the thieves, "our company under Capt. [O.P.] Bayne and the Sugar Creek company under Capt. [James] Montgomery. When they arrived at "the Fort" on the 11th "the bloody villains" had already fled to Missouri. The letter is a "typical" mix of news about the Kansas troubles, work on the claim, and pleasantries about the folks back home. [Before the end of the year, Anderson would sign on with John Brown and follow him to Harpers Ferry.]

Keywords: Anderson, Jeremiah G.; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Land claims; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Sharps rifles; Weapons (see also Guns)


Augustus Wattles, Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to William Hutchinson
Authors: Wattles, Augustus
Date: April 28, 1858
Wattles described violence in the southern portion of Kansas Territory shortly before the Marais des Cygnes massacre.

Keywords: Free state activities; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Marmaton, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery activities; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, J. Williams to Governor [James W.] Denver
Authors: Williams, J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Williams, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, complained about the activities of James Montgomery and "his murderers & robbers" in Bourbon County. Williams, who displayed moderate views, condemned both proslavery and free state violence and maintained that the citizens of Bourbon County simply wanted to live in peace.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Griffith, William Riley; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Violence; Williams, J.


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to General [James W. Denver]
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: May 16, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported that conditions were peaceful in the southeast section of the territory. Smith stated that he had accompanied a group of dragoons on an unsuccessful mission to find and arrest James Montgomery and other free state supporters who allegedly had engaged in violent activities in the area. Smith commented that in his view the "ultra Pro Slavery party" was partly responsible for the unrest in southeast Kansas Territory, but he also believed that "moderate free state" supporters should act to stop the violence.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; Smith, H. P. A.; United States. Army; Violence


Letter, Th. [Thomas] J. Wood, Capt. Cavalry, Comdg. to Govr. J. W. Denver
Authors: Wood, Thomas J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Captain Thomas J. Wood, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on the efforts of the U.S. Army to maintain order in southeast Kansas Territory. Capt. Wood stated that he planned to remove all troops from Fort Scott except a section of artillery and he suggested that there was no need to keep any troops in the area. The Marais des Cygnes massacre took place in Linn County on May 19, 1858, three days after Wood wrote this letter.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Military; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Army; Wood, Thomas J.


Letter, Geo. W. Clarke to Saml. J. Jones
Authors: Clarke, George W.
Date: June 2, 1858
George W. Clarke, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Samuel J. Jones (Sheriff Jones), described a May 30, 1858 incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declared that he was innocent of the charges and viewed Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also described the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamelton, Charles A.; Jayhawkers; Jones, Samuel J. (Sheriff); Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Proslavery supporters; United States. Army; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, H. P. A. Smith to Jas. W. Denver
Authors: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: June 3, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory to Governor James W. Denver, reported on events of May 30, 1858 involving Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker's attempt to arrest George W. Clarke on charges that Clarke participated in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Smith questioned Walker's authority to arrest Clarke, observing that Walker's arrest warrant had been issued by a justice of the peace from a township, Mapleton, that did not yet exist. Smith commented on the general state of unrest in the area and declared that the "County is in fact in open rebellion . . . . complete anarchy prevails." He encouraged Governor Denver to come to Fort Scott to assess the situation for himself and to help restore order.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Clarke, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery; Proslavery perspective; Smith, H. P. A.; Walker, Samuel Douglas


Letter, J. Thompson to His Excellency J. W. Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: June 21, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to his friend, James W. Denver, from the U.S. Department of the Interior regarding Denver's service as governor of Kansas Territory. Thompson briefly discussed possible candidates for appointment to the Kansas Agency, then proceeded to praise Denver at length for his good leadership of Kansas Territory, and he assured him that he had national support for his efforts. Thompson told Denver that the among the States, their party was divided over the Lecompton Constitution, but he hoped that the English Bill would allow that Constitution to be voted on again.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; English Bill; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Mix, Charles E.; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Articles of Agreement for Shubel Morgan's Company
Authors: Morgan, Shubel
Date: July 12, 1858
In July 1858, fifteen men including Shubel Morgan, alias John Brown, J. H. Kagi, James Montgomery, and Augustus Wattles signed this document and thus "agree[d] to be governed by the following rules" of conduct. The rules included "gentlemanly and respectful deportment," obedience to the commander's orders, "no intoxicating drinks," etc.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Free state militia; Kagi, John Henry; Military; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Morgan, Shubel; Wattles, Augustus


Diary
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: July 25, 1858 - December 9, 1859
Joseph Trego first came to Kansas in June 1857. He lived near Mound City (originally Sugar Mound), Linn County, Kansas Territory. These diary entries started on July 25, 1858 and are a continuation of an earlier diary (portions of which were also digitized as part of this project). He described various daily activities including the operation a sawmill in partnership with Thomas Ellwood Smith (Ell in the diary entries) and his brother Edwin Smith. The diary entries provided information on the efforts of making a living and settling on a frontier. They documented some of the border disputes and related activities. Trego was a free state supporter and this was reflected in some of the entries.

Keywords: Diaries; Free state cause; Free state settlers; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sawmills; Smith, Edwin; Smith, Thomas Ellwood; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Record of Arms disbursed by the Kansas State Central Committee
Authors: Kansas State Central Committee
Date: September 24, 1858
Opening with an entry signed by James Montgomery, acknowledging receipt a Sharps rifle and a Colt revolver "to be used in defense of Kansas," this small leather-bound volume contains over 30 such entries for numerous weapons.

Keywords: Blood, James; Free state militia; Guns; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kansas State Central Committee; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Sharps rifles; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to James W. Denver
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: October 15, 1858
Hugh S. Walsh, Secretary under Governor Denver, now Acting Governor, wrote from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to James W. Denver in Wilmington, Ohio. Only days earlier Denver ended his term as governor of Kansas Territory. Walsh updated him on political events occurring in Kansas Territory. He also mentioned that a delegate convention planned to meet at Lawrence on November 10, and that he would do what he could to "clog" the convention until there is a "fair apportionment [of representatives] based on population" to avoid any independent actions taken on the part of free state supporters.

Keywords: Apportionment; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Newspapers; Proslavery support; Roberts, William Young; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to Lewis Cass, Secretary of State
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: November 19, 1858
Acting Governor Hugh S. Walsh wrote from Lecompton, Kansas Territory to Secretary of State Lewis Cass. Walsh requested permission to use $3000 remaining from funds appropriated for the August 1858 election as a means to offer rewards for the capture of James Montgomery, John Brown, and other Free State supporters allegedly engaged in violence in southeastern Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cass, Lewis, 1782-1866; Jayhawkers; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Proslavery perspective; Violence; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, Hugh S. Walsh to Dear General [James Denver]
Authors: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: November 21, 1858
Hugh S. Walsh, Acting Governor of Kansas Territory, wrote from Lecompton to James W. Denver, recently resigned governor of Kansas Territory. Walsh updated Denver on various issues of Territorial governance, including Indian affairs, James Montgomery, land offices, postal service, and the Leavenworth Constitution. On several occasions he conveyed distrust of various men expressing interest in government positions, especially the newly appointed Governor Medary, though Walsh did concede that Medary had "tact."

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Indian agents; Land; Leavenworth Constitution; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Postal service; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Walsh, Hugh Sleight


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 19, 1858
The focus of this letter from Lawrence to Robinson in Washington, D.C., was the effort underway in Lawrence and Douglas County to attract a railroad and to have it built south of the Kansas River. Leavenworth, Kansas City, and Lawrence were obviously in the midst of their battle to gain advantage on the transportation front, and the decisions being made in Washington at that time with respect to land grants were vital to their future interests.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Jayhawkers; Johnnycake, Charles; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 29, 1858
In this letter from Lawrence, December 29, 1858, Smith mentions a few business matters (e.g., the railroad convention) but concentrates on the border conflict, with specific criticism leveled at John Brown and James Montgomery. "Captains Brown & Montgomery continue their 'reign of terror' in Linn and Bourbon counties. . . ."

Keywords: African Americans; Bleeding Kansas; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Newspapers; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves; Smith, Samuel C.


Letter, Your Friend [most likely John Brown] to Capt. James Montgomery
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: January 2, 1859
This brief letter from a "Friend"--most likely John Brown--to James Montgomery, the Linn County jawhawker, was addressed from "Turkey Creek," January 2, 1859: "Osawattomie men made a drive into Missouri the other night, since which some of the settlers & other friends have made a stand on the line to prevent an invasion. You are requested to hold yourself in readiness to call out reinforcements at a moments notice."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state militia; Free state settlers; Jayhawking; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory


Letter, William Hutchinson to "Dear Helen"
Authors: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904
Date: January 3, 1859
A resident of Lawrence and correspondent from the New York Tribune, William Hutchinson wrote his wife Helen from Mapleton, northern Bourbon County, right after the first of the year, 1859, to tell her about "the wars" in the southern part of the territory and about the activities of "Old" John Brown and his followers. Hutchinson met with the "war council," as well as with James Montgomery, advised against "rash measures," and, with Montgomery, participated in a large meeting of the citizens "to devise a plan for peace." (A note on the back of page 4, by R.J. Hinton, reads, "Copied by my wife from original. Interesting." A good number of the documents in this folder are copies--mostly handwritten.)

Keywords: Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hamilton, Charles A.; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Missouri; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Paola, Kansas Territory; Proslavery settlers; Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, Sene Campbell to [Capt. James] Montgomery
Authors: Campbell, Sene
Date: January 4, 1859
Sene Campbell, writing from Fort Scott, K. T. to Capt. James Montgomery, expressed her anger at Montgomery for his roll in the killing of John Little. Little was killed on December 16, 1858, at Fort Scott by a group of free state supporters led by Montgomery who had entered the town to free Benjamin Rice, a free state advocate being held prisoner. Campbell was Little's fiance.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Campbell, Sene; Casualties; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawkers; Jayhawking; Little, J. H.; Little, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violence; Violent deaths; Women


Letter, S. Medary to My Dear Sir
Authors: Medary, S. (Samuel) , 1801-1864
Date: January 12, 1859
Samuel Medary wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to an unknown recipient in Washington, D. C. Medary expressed his disapproval at the way the U. S. Marshall handled the "troubles" in Linn and Bourbon counties that were brought on by free-state radical James Montgomery and his men. He added that the legislature, newly in session, was difficult to work with, as there very few "reliable democrats" in it. Medary also described the legislature's debate over Montgomery's fate.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Danford, Addison; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Roberts, T.R.; Violence; Wright, John W.


Letter, J. G. Anderson to "Dear brother," J. Q. Anderson
Authors: Anderson, J. G.
Date: January 14, 1859
From near Lawrence, Jeremiah G. Anderson wrote about his recent call "into the service," whick took him to Fort Scott and into Missouri with "Old [John] Brown as they call him," where they liberate "ten slaves." Anderson provides some interesting details of their current action and journey, and he observed: "Brown has drawn a paralel [sic] which will be published in the Tribune."

Keywords: Anderson, Jeremiah G.; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Jayhawking; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Rice, Benjamin; Slaves; Underground railroad


Letter, J. P. Root to Hon. Charles Robinson
Authors: Root, Joseph Pomeroy
Date: January 17, 1859
Joseph Root wrote to Charles Robinson from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, informing him of a development that was splitting the Republican (anti-slavery) Party. Root mentioned that a large majority of the free state House members had begun to call themselves "Radicals," or extreme Republicans. He stated that he would leave the party if, in order to be a Republican, he had to be a member of the "Jim Lane Montgomery Men." Root also informed Robinson that a court had been established in Lawrence in order to try violent offenders from Linn, Lykins, and Bourbon counties.

Keywords: Courts; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Roberts, William Young; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Smith, Samuel C.


Letter, [Governor] S. Medary to Dear Sir
Authors: Medary, S. (Samuel) , 1801-1864
Date: January 20, 1859
Governor Medary wrote to an unknown recipient in Washington, D. C. regarding his frustration in governing Kansas Territory and soliciting support for his actions. Medary expressed dismay at the defense of southern Kansas having been turned over to the U. S. Marshall, while the Democrats believe him to be responsible for the arrival of U. S. troops. He added that he was trying his best to deal with the Republican legislature, but he was having a difficult time. Medary referred to James Montgomery's speech of January 19, in which he defended his actions in Linn and Bourbon counties. This speech, Medary claimed, would make it more difficult to bring punishment against him.

Keywords: Bleeding Kansas; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brindle, William; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Military; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Skirmishing


Letter, R. Harding to Mr. [John] Bayless
Authors: Harding, R.
Date: January 22, 1859
R. Harding wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to John Bayless regarding the recent business discussed in the Territorial Legislature. Harding indicated that many members of the Legislature were intent on "Stealing Thunder", or receiving the glory for policies first introduced by others. He thought that, in light of recent difficulties with skirmishes in Linn and Bourbon Counties, Governor Medary would soon lose his. Harding seemed to support James Montgomery, who was responsible for many of those skirmishes, stating that "the provocation was evidently great and now he certainly has the sympathies of a large majority of the community best acquainted with the facts."

Keywords: Bayless, John; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Harding, R.; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lawrence; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871


Letter, Wm. Hutchinson to Friend [Captain James] Montgomery
Authors: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904
Date: January 23, 1859
William Hutchinson, writing from Lawrence to Captain James Montgomery, described reports of an effort by John Brown to liberate a free state prisoner being held at Paris, Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Antislavery; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Paris, Kansas Territory


Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: February 4, 1859
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County responding to his recipient's previous letter. Vansickle seemed hopeful, as he saw there was a "prospect of peace" in his part of the country, and his business and crops were successful. He also commented on James Montgomery and John Brown, criticizing that they "free more horses than negros," calling them scoundrels and warning his recipient to "never vindicate thare [their] cause." Vansickle added that he would assist the recipient in coming to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Land claims; Merchants; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Vansickle, John H.; Xenia, Kansas Territory


Letter, Frank Walker to M. B. Walker
Authors: Walker, Frank
Date: March 4, 1859
Frank Walker of Mound City, Kansas Territory, wrote to Mr. B. Walker (from the context, presumably a brother) recounting recent skirmishes between the free state men led by James Montgomery and the pro-slavery "scamps" in Bourbon and Linn counties. Walker dubbed Montgomery one of "the likedest man in Kanzas," though at the time, in pro-slavery Linn County, he was considered an outlaw. Walker's letter included references to an incident occurring on Dec 16, 1858 in Fort Scott, in which Montgomery and his men attacked a pro-slavery prison to save a fellow free state man. Walker concluded by encouraging his family to obtain a land warrant in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state perspective; Guns; Land acquisition; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Walker, Frank; Walker, M.B.; Weapons (see also Guns); Wounds and injuries


Letter, C. [Charles] E. Griffith to Capt. J. [James] Montgomery
Authors: Griffith, Charles E.
Date: November 15, 1859
Charles Griffith, an Osawatomie newspaper publisher writing from that town, informed Captain James Montgomery that he believed voting fraud had occurred in the November 8, 1859, territorial legislature election. Griffith claimed that, in the absence of the fraud, Montgomery would have won a seat in the territorial house of representatives.

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, November 1859; Elections; Griffith, Charles E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Voting; Voting fraud (see also Contested elections)


Letter, Leander Martin to Capt. Jas. Montgomery
Authors: Martin, Leander
Date: December 13, 1859
Leander Martin, writing from Osawatomie, K. T., encouraged James Montgomery to contest the results of the November 8, 1859, election for representatives to the territorial legislature. Montgomery was defeated by William R. Wagstaff in a race for a seat in the territorial house of representatives. Montgomery's response was written at the bottom of the letter.

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, November 1859; Elections; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Martin, Leander; Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Voting; Voting fraud (see also Contested elections)


Letter, James Montgomery to L. [Leander] Martin
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: December 18, 1859
James Montgomery, writing from Mound City, K.T., responded to Leander Martin's suggestion that he (Montgomery) contest the results of the November 8, 1859 election for representatives to the territorial legislature. Montgomery lost a race for a seat in the territorial house of representatives to William R. Wagstaff. Montgomery indicated that he had no plans to contest the election himself but would not object if others contested it on his behalf. Martin's letter is included at the top of the document.

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, November 1859; Elections; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Martin, Leander; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Voting; Voting fraud (see also Contested elections)


Letter, John McCannon to Capt. James Montgomery
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: December 24, 1859
John McCannon, writing from Clear Creek, K. T., a location that is currently in Colorado, described politics and the economy in the gold mining region of western Kansas Territory. McCannon commented on the formation of the Territory of Jefferson, an extralegal government formed in 1859 by residents of Arapahoe County, K. T. in 1859. McCannon also mentioned mining activities in the area.

Keywords: Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Clear Creek, Kansas Territory; Colorado; Colorado gold fields; Gold mines and mining; McCannon, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Territory of Jefferson


Letter, John McCannon to [James Montgomery]
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: May 1860
John McCannon, writing from Denver City, K. T., a location that is currently in Colorado, described the killing of a man named Akins. McCannon claimed that Akins was killed by pro-slavery supporters. McCannon also commented favorably upon the Republican Party's nomination of Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate.

Keywords: Akins, (?); Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Casualties; Colorado; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; McCannon, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violent deaths


Letter, James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: October 6, 1860
Having returned from a trip to the East (where he visited Stearns, Horace Greeley, and others in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia), Montgomery wrote from Mound City, Linn County, that he "found the people greatly excited." News of violence directed against free state men in Texas and Arkansas had awakened Kansans' sense of urgency, as Montgomery continued his efforts to free slaves and undercut the slave economy of western Missouri.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border ruffians; Free state supporters; Fugitive slaves; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Texas


Letter, James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: November 27, 1860
From Mound City, James Montgomery wrote Stearns about recent trouble at Fort Scott and acting governor George M. Beebe's visit. He came, according to Montgomery, to ascertain for himself if the rumors about Montgomery's activities were correct. He left satisfied that the free staters were acting properly and "promising to do what he could to reform abuses" in the federal courts and protect their rights. Although things were quiet at present and Montgomery mentioned the arrival of more fugitive slaves, who could now stay safely in Kansas, he warned that the introduction of federal troops into southern Kansas would create an explosive situation.

Keywords: Beebe, George Monroe; Bowie knife; Democratic Party (U.S.); Firearms; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Jennison, Charles Ransford, 1834-1884; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sharps rifles; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, J. H. Vansickle to Dear Sir
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: November 27, 1860
John Vansickle wrote from Bourbon County regarding the current economic conditions in Kansas Territory. Vansickle stated that the weather had remained dry for almost 12 months, and that corn and other crops had become valuable commodities. He added that the ruffians and the lawless part of the community would not help themselves by working when they had the chance. Vansickle concluded by saying he had plenty of food, and he discussed land claim opportunities with the recipient.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Droughts; Economic conditions; Land acquisition; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Prices; Vansickle, John H.


Letter, Augustus Wattles to Dear [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Wattles, Augustus
Date: December 3, 1860
This letter, written from New York by Augustus Wattles, was addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The main focus of the letter was on two proslavery men--Captain Doake and General Clark--who persisted in mistreating free state settlers along the Missouri-Kansas border. The letter also referred to Charles Jennison and to James Montgomery, whose band of free state militiamen was still active even into 1860. Wattles vehemently maintained that free state forces were only organizing for their own protection, not for a great insurrection as the Missourians believed.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Border disputes and warfare; Clarke, George W.; Doak, William H.; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Land sales; Missourians; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to My dear good friend [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: December 3, 1860
This letter was written by S. C. Pomeroy of the Kansas Relief Committee, one of several aid committees that had been formed to ease the suffering of settlers in Kansas. This particular committee specifically sought to send relief funds and provisions into Kansas during the drought of 1860. The letter is addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, keeping him informed about the efforts to distribute food and clothing. Pomeroy appreciated the help he had received from Hyatt, but he was disappointed in Dr. Webb. The last page of the letter has been crossed out and edited.

Keywords: Droughts; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Jennison, Charles Ransford, 1834-1884; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Relief; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, J.M. [James Montgomery] to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: December 12, 1860
Montgomery wrote again from Mound City to update Stearns on the activities of "old Harney" (General William S. Harney) and the futile federal government efforts at "enforcing the Fugitive Slave law on us here; it can't be done." Montgomery insisted that despite the government's effort to portray "'Montgomery and his band'" as not of the people, popular support for his activities had just been unanimously endorsed at a mass meeting in Mound City.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Harney, William S.; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; United States. Army; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, J.M. [James Montgomery] to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: December 14, 1860
In response to a letter dated November 29, Montgomery informed Stearns that "Uncle Sam has stolen all my late corrispondence [sic]. I suppose he thinks he will find some Treason in it:--He is welcome to all he can find." Much of the news about his activities and intention, insisted Montgomery, was simply newspaper talk. "'Montgomery's Band' is a myth. Montgomery's men are the people, and Montgomery himslef is one them. [sic]." He was very interested in getting the press back East to inform the public of "the real state of affairs here."

Keywords: Free labor; Free state activities; Fugitive slaves; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Linn County, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; United States. Army


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [W. R. Griffith]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: December 18, 1860
With regard to the "difficulties in Linn and Bourbon Counties," Ewing wrote William Riley Griffith of Marmaton, Bourbon County, regarding their shared belief that the Republican Party should not condone the violence perpetrated by James Montgomery and company. Ewing was hopeful that if Kansas was admitted soon, order would be restored.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state activities; Griffith, William Riley; Lincoln administration; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marmaton, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Violence


Letter, James Montgomery to F. B. Sanborn
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: January 14, 1861
Just two weeks before Kansas would be admitted to the Union and in the midst of the early secession crisis, Montgomery (Mound City) told Franklin B. Sanborn (Boston) that he (Montgomery) did not favor an invasion of "the slave states so long as they keep themselves at home," but Missouri was crossing the line and interfering in Kansas affairs. He also commented on recent mob violence in Boston and General Harney's futile efforts to enforce the Fugitive Slave law in southern Kansas.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Democratic Party (U.S.); Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Harney, William S.; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Martial law; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Secession; Slavery


Photograph, James Montgomery
Authors: Leonard & Martin, artists
Date: 
James Montogomery came to Linn County, Kansas Territory, early in the territorial period after living in Ohio, Kentucky and Missouri. He was active in the free state cause and was involved in most of the conflict between pro-slavery and free state forces in that area. He was ordered off his property but refused to leave the area. He raised a militia troop that was active in 1857.

Keywords: Free state militia; Free state supporters; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Photographs and Illustrations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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