Skip Redundent Navigation
Territorial Kansas Online 1854-1861 Explore Topics Territorial A-Z Map Lesson Plans  

Territorial A-Z

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 0-9


26 results for Mills and mill-work:
Letter, Samuel C. Pomeroy to Sir [likely Edward Everett Hale]
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: July 27, 1854
Pomeroy, writing from Southhampton, Massachusetts, indicated his desire to go to Kansas to explore business possibilities and to keep slavery from gaining a foothold in the territory. Pomeroy, who likely was writing to Edward Everett Hale, expressed interest in assisting with the work of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery; Business; Economic development; Massachusetts; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Water-power


Letter, S. C. [Samuel Clarke] Pomeroy to Sir
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: October 10, 1855
Pomeroy, writing from Kansas City, informed a New England Emigrant Aid Company representative that he had drawn on Mr. L. (probably Amos Lawrence) for $1000 and Mr. Haskins for $300 to pay for construction work on mills and hotels in Kansas Territory. Pomeroy emphasized that he would reduce spending after completion of the mills and hotels.

Keywords: Construction; Economic development; Hotels; Kansas City, Missouri; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891


Letter, O. [Orville] C. Brown to Dear Sir [Edward Allen]
Authors: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: March 18, 1856
Orville C. Brown wrote from his home in Osawatomie to Edward Allen, describing the location of Osawatomie and the natural resources in the area. He also informed the recipient of the letter about the essential provisions to bring when emigrating to Kansas, as well as the current situation of free staters in Kansas.

Keywords: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Free state cause; Indian lands; Mills and mill-work; Native Americans; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory


Letter, E. Hoogland to Thos. N. Stinson, Esq.
Authors: Hoogland, Edward
Date: July 6, 1856
Edward Hoogland, a resident of Tecumseh, KT who was visiting his family in New York, described a meeting with Governor Wilson Shannon in St. Louis concerning territorial politics. Hoogland displayed a pro-slavery perspective in his comments on Kansas affairs. He described efforts to encourage settlement in Kansas Territory, especially Tecumseh, and to promote economic development in the territory. He mentioned an acquaintance who hoped to establish a sawmill and a gristmill in the territory.

Keywords: Economic development; Gristmills; Hoogland, Edward; Law and Order Party; Mills and mill-work; Sawmills; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Stinson, Thomas N.; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Town building (see Town development); Town development


Letter, L. B. Russell and C. J. Higginson to Messrs. [Samuel C.] Pomeroy and [Charles H.] Branscomb
Authors: Higginson, Charles J.; Russell, Le Baron
Date: October 1, 1856
Le Baron Russell and Charles J. Higginson, members of the New England Emigrant Aid Company Executive Committee, wrote from Boston to S. C. Pomeroy and Charles H. Branscomb in Kansas. Russell and Higginson informed the two company agents that they would be required to settle all company accounts, to compile a complete inventory of all company property in Kansas, and to provide a statement of the precise terms of all company contracts, particularly those related. They urged Pomeroy and Branscomb to devote all of their attention to company affairs and to make every effort to manage affairs more frugally.

Keywords: Branscomb, Charles H.; Emigrant aid companies; Higginson, Charles J.; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Russell, Le Baron


Letter, A. Finch to Mr. [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Finch, H.
Date: December 22, 1856
This letter, written from Osawatomie by A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee, provided general information about the inhabitants of Osawatomie and neighboring areas. It included a list of about half of the settlers residing in Osawatomie at this time, including the four pro-slavery voters. Mr. Finch went into detail about the most fertile areas that would be excellent sites for free state settlements, and about the economic conditions and financial needs of the settlers.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Agriculture; Chestnut, William; Churches; Economic conditions; Emigration and immigration; Finch, H.; Geer, Samuel; Hawley, John H.; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Mills and mill-work; Money; Natural resources; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Sears, W. A.; Settlement; Storrs, N. S.; Timber; Town settlement; Updegraff, Andrew


Settlers on Little Sugar Creek
Authors: Stewart, John E.
Date: c. 1856 or 1857
This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border ruffians; Churches; Free state settlers; Illinois; Indiana; Iowa; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Missouri; Ohio; Proslavery settlers; Schools; Settlement; Timber; Titus, Henry Theodore; Violence; Westport, Missouri


Finance Committee's Schedule of Kanzas Property owned by the N. E. Em. Aid Co.
Authors: New England Emigrant Aid Company Finance Committee
Date: May 26, 1857
A summary listing of the real property owned by the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas. The report lists the estimated value of each property, with the total value being $112, 400.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Burlington, Kansas Territory; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Financial statements; Hotels; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; New England Emigrant Aid Company Finance Committee; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Town shares; Wabaunsee, Kansas Territory


Letter, your affect. Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: December 5, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego described the furnishings and atmosphere in their "Bachelor's Hall" of a cabin. As he greatly missed them, Trego was eager to receive his family's daguerreotypes by mail; he also spoke at length about both business and domestic matters at home. His friend Ell (Thomas Ellwood Smith) prepared to embark on a trip to St. Louis to purchase a corn mill, which they hoped would translate into a business enterprise that would sustain the three of them.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Daguerreotypes; Domestics; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Livestock; Mills and mill-work; Missouri River; Smith, Edwin; Smith, Thomas Ellwood; St. Louis, Missouri; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Letter, Your devoted Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: December 11, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from his cabin near Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory to his wife, Alice, at home in Illinois with their three daugthers. His friend Ell's trip to St. Louis had been aborted due to the freezing conditions of the Missouri River. The town company of Sugar Mound was meeting that day, in which the formal site of the town would be selected; Trego hoped to build their new home on a lot near his mill, which was in an especially picturesque area. His comments about the current "political storm" reveal the variation of perspectives among free state supporters, as he found free state supporters in his area were for a "free state government from politic[al] motives & not humane." He also reported that a group of armed free state men had passed by two days before, looking for a "nest" of pro-slavery men in Bourbon County. Trego added descriptions of their daily life and their struggle to keep their living expenses down.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Domestics; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Missouri River; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Town companies; Town development; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Water transportation


Letter, Your affectionate Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: December 21, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego, in addition to elaborating on hunting and mill work, described at length the skirmishing between local free state and proslavery men, which had been continuous throughout the summer and fall. He reported the manner in which Missourians had seized and occupied lands in the absence of their owners, who were free state men. "Bogus courts" had brought the free state men who defended their lands to court, which resulted in so many fees owed that the men had to sell their land to pay them; the new owners were usually Missourians. Trego accused proslavery supporters of fabricating stories about destruction caused by warring Abolitionists in order to draw the support of the U.S. troops. Controversy over the Lecompton Constitution flourished in free state circles; the Free State Legislature in Topeka had repealed the "bogus laws" of the Territorial Legislature and appointed James Lane the head of a free state militia.

Keywords: Bogus laws; Bogus legislature; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Business enterprises; Free state legislature; Free state militia; Hunting; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Military; Mills and mill-work; Missourians; Proslavery supporters; Sharps rifles; Skirmishing; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Letter, Your affect. Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: January 2, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from his cabin near Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Rock Island, Illinois. Trego briefly updated her on the status of the mill enterprise before expressing more personal sentiments. He felt it had been a mistake not to bring her to the Territory, as he could not devote all of his energy to the tasks at hand for missing her. Trego also discussed the length of time it took her letters to reach him via the postal service.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Postal service; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Women


Letter, Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: January 9, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego reported that the mill was finally up and running, leaving them to occupy themselves with housekeeping and construction of outbuildings near the mill; he had decided to delay building a new home for his family until the spring. Trego responded to his wife's concerns about free state and proslavery skirmishing in the area, conveying his confidence that "truly there is no probability of the people here at Sugar Mound being molested" by them.

Keywords: Construction; Daily life; Domestics; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Skirmishing; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Letter, Your loving Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: January 18, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego, tired of "keeping bach" (living a bachelor's lifestyle), he occupied himself with the milling business, which was sawing 4000 ft of lumber each day. A member of the town company in Mound City, he had also recently traveled to gain support for the construction of some new roads in the area; he was also interested in developing a school. At the end of the letter, Trego wrote personal notes to each of his three daughters.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Roads; School buildings; Schools; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Teachers; Timber; Town development; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Letter, Your devoted Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: January 24, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego described how, since the shelter being built around the mill equipment was not yet complete, the wind and rain interfered with their ability to work. Though the work was hard, he favored the milling business over other means toward income. Trego responded to a newspaper article from the Rock Island Advertiser that his wife had sent him, deeming their coverage of the Kansas troubles "sensational." He expected that Fort Scott would soon be destroyed by free state militiamen, as "Bourbon County Bandits" (proslavery supporters) had been harassing extensively free state supporters in the area. Despite all this disorder, the development prospects of Mound City, in Linn County, appeared favorable.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Business enterprises; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Postal service; Proslavery activities; Railroads; Rock Island Advertiser; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Telegraph; Town development; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Weather


Letter, Your loving husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: February 11, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego responded emotionally to his wife's proposition that she would travel East in the spring to visit friends and come to the Territory in the fall, instead of the coming spring as previously planned; he conveyed great disappointment, but insisted that she go if she really wanted to. According to Trego, the structure that would shelter his mill would be raised the next day, and Fort Scott had been seized peacefully be free state men "as the villains fled to save their bacon." He doubted that the treaty drawn there would change the antagonistic conduct of the opposing sides.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Letter, Your aff. husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: February 13, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego further expressed his disappointment that his wife did not plan to travel to the Territory with him that spring. The change in plans did not seem to disrupt those of the Smith brothers, Trego's companions, as they planned to gather their own families. Trego supposed he would stay behind and conduct business at the mill and perhaps enter the market for land sales. The mill's shelter had successfully been erected the day before, so their production would not not be so dependent on the weather conditions.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Land sales; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Missouri River; Real estate investment; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Weather; Women


Letter, Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: February 27, 1858
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton predicted a good property market for the coming spring, despite the "hard money matters" which had been the situation during the winter. He reported that the Shawnee lands would open soon, to have them paid for by the end of the summer, and that Hill's land investments in Manhattan were "in good standing". Morton added that Samuel Simpson has been busy lately, traveling back and forth from Quindaro to Lawrence.

Keywords: Economic conditions; Hill, Hiram; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: February 28, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Mound City, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego described his overland travels to an Osage Indian trading post and his encounters with the Osage people. He and his friend, Edwin, traveled through Fort Scott, Bourbon County, on their way back to Sugar Mound; Trego recounted their tour of the town, with large homes, a Plaza at the town's center, and a steam mill much like his own. Trego reported that, if they had stayed longer in Fort Scott, they may not have been allowed out, as free state men were collecting in large numbers to capture proslavery "thieves" and destroy the town in the process.

Keywords: Animals; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Indian lands; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Osage Indians; Real estate investment; Steam power; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trading posts; Travel; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; United States. Army


Letter, Nathan Starks to Hiram Hill Esq
Authors: Starks, Nathan
Date: March 8, 1858
Nathan Starks wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, asking for Hill's assistance in securing his old homestead in Massachusetts. Starks described his situation: he had moved to K.T. seeking better health and business, but had been disappointed in both of those, the social scene, and the lawlessness of the land. He hoped to return to his old homestead in Massachusetts after a year of life in Kansas Territory, provided that it had not been sold.

Keywords: Daily life; Domestics; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; Mills and mill-work; Real estate investment; Starks, Nathan


Letter, Thomas H. Webb to M. F. Conway
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: May 15, 1858
Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb expressed satisfaction that Conway appeared to be putting the company's affairs in Kansas Territory in order. But he described his "melancholy" over the poor management of the Company's business interests in the past.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Emigrant aid companies; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Thomas H. Webb to M. F. Conway
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: August 28, 1858
Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb gave instructions to Conway on several New England Emigrant Aid Company business matters including the potential sale of the mill in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Webb comments on the decline in real estate values in Kansas Territory in the aftermath of the Panic of 1857.

Keywords: Batcheller, Kansas Territory; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; Emigrant aid companies; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Real estate; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Town lots; Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Thomas H. Webb to Friend [Martin F.] Conway
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: March 23, 1859
Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb informed Conway of the Company's desire to end its operations in Kansas as soon as possible. He recommended that Conway sell the Company's mill equipment at a low price and suggested that he sell it to the Batchelder Town Company. In a postscript, Webb urged Conway to prepare information to present to the territorial legislature related to Company claims for losses during the early territorial troubles, particularly for losses incurred during the May 1856 sack of Lawrence.

Keywords: Batcheller, Kansas Territory; Conway, Martin Franklin; Damage claims; Emigrant aid companies; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Thomas H. Webb to M. F. Conway
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: April 30, 1859
Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb informed Conway that the Company's Executive Committee had approved a proposal to sell mill equipment to the Batcheller Town Company.

Keywords: Batcheller Town Association; Batcheller, Kansas Territory; Conway, Martin Franklin; Davis County, Kansas Territory; Geary County, Kansas; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Town companies; Town development; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, Thomas H. Webb to M. F. Conway
Authors: Webb, Thomas H. (Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: August 20, 1859
Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. He expressed his concern about a rumor that the Company's mill in Manhattan had been sold because of delinquent taxes. Webb asked Conway to investigate the matter.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Property tax; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Tax-sales; Taxation; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Photograph, Gale block, Topeka, Kansas
Authors: W. P. Bliss, Photographic Car
Date: c. 1864
A view of Gale block on the east side of Kansas Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets, Topeka, Kansas, 1863-1865. The Gale block was used by the Kansas Legislature in the 1860s. Many of the buildings shown in the photograph were built during the Kansas territorial period. The photograph was taken by W. P. Bliss, Photographic Car.

Keywords: Bliss, W. P.; Business enterprises; Cartes de visite; Cities and towns; Commerce; Gale block, Topeka, Kansas; Mills and mill-work; Photographs and Illustrations; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Streets; Topeka buildings; Topeka, Kansas


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

The current URL is http://www.territorialkansasonline.org/~imlskto/cgi-bin/index.php?SCREEN=keyword&selected_keyword=Mills%20a
nd%20mill-work&sort_by=true&submit=Go&allresults=1.
This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.