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20 results for Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865:
Lombard Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
Students of Lombard College at Galesburg, Illinois, presented this banner to Abraham Lincoln on October 7, 1858. Lincoln's fifth debate with Stephen A. Douglas was held at Galesburg that evening. Lincoln later presented the banner to Mark W. Delahay of Leavenworth, who was related to Lincoln by marriage. Delahay used the banner in the 1860 presidential election.

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Elections; Flags and banners; Illinois; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lombard College; Objects


Daniel Mulford Valentine Diary
Authors: Valentine, Daniel Mulford, 1830-1907
Date: January 01, 1859-December 31, 1859
Daniel Mulford Valentine, a 28-year-old lawyer and surveyor, moved to Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, from Fontanelle, Iowa, in mid 1859. Although many of Valentine's daily entries simply record the weather and/or the fact that he spent the day "loafing" or "reading," the diary also details the daily routines of a frontier lawyer and includes a few extraordinary observations on the political happenings of the day. Valentine recorded information about Kansas elections and local politics, and he offered assessments of many of the territory's leaders. Of most interest, however, are of his impressions of Abraham Lincoln, the Illinois lawyer and politician, who visited Leavenworth in early December 1859 to deliver the last two speeches of his brief Kansas tour. In later years, Daniel M. Valentine became a well-known Kansas jurist, ultimately serving for twenty-fours years on the Kansas Supreme Court.

Keywords: Diaries; Elections; Iowa; Lawyers; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Political parties; Valentine, Daniel Mulford


Letter, A. Lincoln (copy) to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Lincoln, Abraham
Date: May 14, 1859
This two-page, handwritten copy of a letter to Mark Delahay from Abraham Lincoln was probably given to the KSHS by Delahay's daughter Mary E. Delahay in the early 1900s. Lincoln regretfully declined an invitation to attend the Osawatomie convention on May 18 which was to formally organize the Republican Party in Kansas. Lincoln warned against "the temptation to lower the Republican Standard [in whatever platform the convention might adopt] in order to gather recruits. In my judgment," Lincoln continued," such a step would be a serious mistake" that "would surrender the object of the Republican organization--the preventing the Spread and Nationalization of Slaver . . ."

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Slave power; Slavery


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Vernon [Thomas Vernon]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: February 23, 1860
Along with a request that his friend Thomas Vernon purchase a list of used books for him in New York City, Ewing commented on the presidential nomination and the fact that the Republicans were "not so extensively engaged in preaching the irrepressible conflict as before John Browns day." Ewing hoped the party picked someone "at least as moderate" as Abraham Lincoln, whom he "could heartily support."

Keywords: Bates, Edward, 1793-1869; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Election, Presidential, 1860; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; New York, New York; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Vernon, Thomas


Letter, John McCannon to [James Montgomery]
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: May 1860
John McCannon, writing from Denver City, K. T., a location that is currently in Colorado, described the killing of a man named Akins. McCannon claimed that Akins was killed by pro-slavery supporters. McCannon also commented favorably upon the Republican Party's nomination of Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate.

Keywords: Akins, (?); Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Casualties; Colorado; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; McCannon, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violent deaths


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Abraham Lincoln]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: May 6, 1860
On May 6, 1860, ten days before the Republican convention convened in Chicago, Illinois, Ewing wrote to Abraham Lincoln at Springfield, Ill., regarding the fact that the Kansas Republican delegation had been "instructed by the Convention by which they were selected to cast their votes (if they should have any) for Mr. Seward [considered by most a more radical candidate]. . ." Ewing wanted to explain how this happened and why D.W. Wilder, a strong Seward man, was the Leavenworth delegate rather than "Col. Delahay who was understood to be strongly in favor of your nomination."

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Chicago, Illinois; Delahay, Mark W.; Election, Presidential, 1860; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Illinois; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Political conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911


Letter, Geo. W. Deitzler to Friend [Samuel N.] Wood
Authors: Deitzler, George W.
Date: August 18, 1860
In the wake of Abraham Lincoln's nomination, May 16, 1860, as the Republican presidential nominee, Deitzler wrote from Lawrence that Mark W. Delahay had gone to Springfield, Illinois, on behalf of "our Gen'l J. H. Lane," and the latter was going East soon, "to howl frightfully against Democracy & in favor of 'Old Abe' & so secure, if possible, the confidence of that good man." Deitzler was worried about the new administration, if it was to be controlled by the likes of Lane and Delahay. On another subject, in behalf of a friend, Deitzler asked about the new territorial divorce law, and Wood's availability to handle such a case "in a quiet way."

Keywords: Deitzler, George W.; Delahay, Mark W.; Divorce law and legislation; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, W. H. Powell to "Dear Sir" [James Blood]
Authors: Powell, W. H.
Date: August 26, 1860
From Bloomington, Illinois, W. H. Powell, the Illinois State Superintendent of Public Instruction, wrote that he had noticed Blood's call for seed wheat for the "unfortunate settlers of Kansas," and he wondered if they would be interested in trading "for Stock--either Cattle or Stock Hogs." Powell offered to arrange shipment of 2000 bushels of "good seed wheat" immediately if a deal were struck. He wrote that farmers in his area were growing "Red Amber wheat, and that if Blood needed a character reference, he could contact "Mr. Lincoln at Springfield, where I reside, & who can vouch for my good faith &C."

Keywords: Blood, James; Crops; Droughts; Farmers; Free state settlers; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Springfield, Illinois


Letter, S. T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: November 6, 1860
S. T. Learnard, a farmer and occasional state legislator from Bakersfield, Vermont, wrote his "Kansas" son frequently and complained that replies from Kansas were far too scarce. In this letter, S.T. Learnard commented on suffering in the territory, presumably from drought, and his hope that the national election would eliminate "her troubles from one source." He complimented the "brave men and women" of Kansas for their "suffering and endurance in the Cause of Liberty," and expressed confidence that Abraham Lincoln, who did well in Bakersfield, would win New York.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Bakersfield, Vermont; Droughts; Election, Presidential, 1860; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865


Letter, J. W. Robinson to Dear Friend [Isaac] Goodnow
Authors: Robinson, John W.
Date: November 12, 1860
John W. Robinson wrote from his home in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow. Robinson had given Goodnow agency to sell some of his Manhattan properties, and thanked him for his assistance as he was in great need of money. Robinson enthusiastically reacted to Lincoln's recent election to the Presidency, and claimed "even the Democrats assert that they are gratified at the result." He believed Kansas would be admitted to statehood early in the Legislative session. Robinson also discussed Manhattan's recent development projects, including new roads and a pontoon bridge.

Keywords: Bridges; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln administration; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Medicine; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Roads; Robinson, John W.; Town development


Henry J. Adams, Washington, D.C. to William Hutchinson
Authors: Adams, Henry J.
Date: November 14, 1860
Adams was in Washington as a special agent of Kansas Territory attempting to convince the U.S. Congress to pay claims for damages suffered by Kansas citizens during episodes of violence in the territory. Adams reported on the prospects of getting the claims paid during the upcoming session of Congress as well as on his concerns about being compensated for his lobbying efforts. He expressed particular concern that Charles Robinson intended to cheat him out of his pay. Adams also commented on Abraham Lincoln's election as president and the possible secession of Southern states in response to the election results.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Claims (see Damage claims or Land claims); Damage claims; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, M. W. Delahay to My Dear Sir
Authors: Delahay, Mark W.
Date: December 1, 1860
In response to an inquiry about a presidential appointment, Delahay wrote from Leavenworth that it was too soon to bother the president elect with such matters. When the time came, perhaps in April or May, Delahay believed Lincoln would treat Kansas fairly and might "consult his friends in Kansas and I may be one of them . . . I have been an old friend of Mr. Lincoln and he is a relative of my wife." (This is identified as a "circular letter," so perhaps it was mailed to a number of individuals with similar interests.)

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Patronage, political; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Letter, Lyman Trumbull to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Trumbull, Lyman , 1813-1896
Date: December 14, 1860
U.S. Senator Lyman Trumbull, an Illinois supporter of A. Lincoln's and long-time acquaintance of Delahay, wrote from Washington, D.C., to thank the Kansan for his efforts in the recent campaign. The senator hoped his friend would be rewarded by his fellow citizens; "It would give me sincere pleasure to see you in the Senate from the new State of Kansas . . ." Trumbull also commented on secession crisis, the failures of the Buchanan administration, and the absolute necessity for the government to resist the withdrawal of states from the Union.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Buchanan administration; Delahay, Mark W.; Illinois; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Secession; South Carolina; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [W. R. Griffith]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: December 18, 1860
With regard to the "difficulties in Linn and Bourbon Counties," Ewing wrote William Riley Griffith of Marmaton, Bourbon County, regarding their shared belief that the Republican Party should not condone the violence perpetrated by James Montgomery and company. Ewing was hopeful that if Kansas was admitted soon, order would be restored.

Keywords: Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state activities; Griffith, William Riley; Lincoln administration; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marmaton, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Violence


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 20, 1860
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, regarding the political situation there. Marcus suspected that an organization existed, on the part of Virginia and Maryland, to block the presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, and stated that, if the national situation did not better itself, that he had "no doubt that he [Lincoln] will sacrifice his life" improving it. He added that economic conditions were poor, and that many Congressmen were left unpaid.

Keywords: Dennison, William, 1815-1882; Economic conditions; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Secession; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Hon. John Sherman]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Native Americans; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pettit, John; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear [Joseph J.] Coombs
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Coombs, Joseph J.; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Presidential appointments; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. Congress. Senate; Washington, D.C.


Emancipation Proclamation Lithograph
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1864-1875
Lithograph of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, printed by L. Lipman. Similar lithographs were published and sold by Martin & Judson of Madison, WI, from 1864-1875.

Keywords: Emancipation Proclamation; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Photographs and Illustrations


Photograph, Abraham Lincoln
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1850s
A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.

Keywords: Cartes de visite; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Photographs and Illustrations


Portrait, Stephen Douglas
Authors: Lussier, Louis
Date: 
Portrait of Stephen Douglas by Louis Lussier. Douglas helped write the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which called for the repeal of the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Kansas and Nebraska were opened up for settlement but the people living there, not the national government, would determine whether these states would be free or slave. Douglas had been a member of Congress and a United States Senator from Illinois from 1847 until his death in 1861. He ran for President, unsuccessfully, against Abraham Lincoln in 1860.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lussier, Louis; Objects; Popular sovereignty


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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