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5 results for Leeman, William H.:
Displaying results:1-5
Letter, William H. Leeman to "Dear Mother"
Authors: Leeman, William H.
Date: July 15, 1856
William H. Leeman, a follower of John Brown in Kansas and eventually a casualty of the Harpers Ferry raid, wrote this letter to his mother while "traveling across the prairies of Iowa" in July 1856. Although he briefly mentions an encounter with "2,000 border ruffians," he assures his mother that he is safe, in good health, and well armed, and that he is much happier in this "adventure" than had he staid home and "worked in a shop."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cannons; Free state militia; Iowa; Leeman, William H.; Militia; Missouri; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, William Leeman to "Dear Mother"
Authors: Leeman, William H.
Date: November 9, 1856
Writing to his Mother from Nebraska Territory on November 4, 1856, Leeman, who "belong[ed] to Old Browns company," said he had just left Kansas Territory because, after driving the "Border Ruffians" out, the governor and "his troops were after us [and] we were obliged to leave the territory." Leeman hoped to go back to his 160 acre farm in Kansas soon and encouraged his Mother to come when the troubles were over.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state settlers; Jayhawking; Leeman, William H.; Militia; Nebraska Territory; Osawatomie, Battle of; Sharps rifles


Letter, William Henry Leeman to "Dear Mother"
Authors: Leeman, William H.
Date: April 1, 1857
One of several letters in this collection written by young William Leeman, a native of Maine, to members of his family (mother, father, and sisters) during his travels with one of John Brown's company through Iowa and Nebraska, back to Kansas. Several letters were written late in 1856 and early 1857 from Archer, Nebraska Territory, but this one, dated April 7, 1857, was sent from Plymouth, presumably in Brown County, Kansas Territory. Leeman wrote of his plan to return home and bring his family to Kansas, perhaps as early as the summer, if there were no more "trouble" in the territory.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown County, Kansas Territory; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state settlers; Houses; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leeman, William H.


Letter, William Leeman to "Dear Mother"
Authors: Leeman, William H.
Date: October 2, 1859
From "Harpers Ferry" about two weeks before the raid that took his life, William H. Leeman wrote his mother that, although he didn't want to worry her, he was "waring with Slavery the greatest Curse that ever infested America," and he fully expected the entire South to be "free" by the time they finished. He had "been Engaged [for the past three years] in a Secret Asosiation [sic] of as gallaint fellows as ever puled a trigger with the sole purpose of the Extermination of Slavery," and they were now ready and "determined to strike for Freedom Incite the Slaves to Rebelion and Establish a free government."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Leeman, William H.; Slaveholders; Slavery


Letter, L. F. Parsons to "Dear Friends Redpath & Hinton"
Authors: Parsons, Luke F.
Date: December 1859
Parsons, "a soldier under John Brown" in Kansas, who fought in the battles of Black Jack and Osawatomie (see, Twenty-fifth Biennial Report, KSHS, 135-136), wrote this letter from Osawatomie to James Redpath and Richard J. Hinton in response to their "notice in the Republican in regard to publishing the life of John Brown & associates at Harpers Ferry & your request for information." In addition to his Kansas activities, Parsons was with Brown and company in Iowa during the winter of 1857-58 and mentions, as did Kagi and others, the "Lyceums" conducted by Brown around their evening campfires and the "thorough course of military instruction under Col. Whipple as Drillmaster." Parsons, who was obviously proud of his association with Brown, apparently just missed being in on the Harpers Ferry raid--he had returned to KT during the long wait and was not recalled.

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Owen; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Coppoc, Barclay; Coppoc, Edwin; Forbes, Hugh; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas City Metropolitan; Kansas City, Missouri; Leeman, William H.; Moffett, Charles; Osawatomie, Battle of; Parsons, Luke F.; Pate, Henry Clay; Quakers (see Society of Friends); Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Rice, Benjamin; Springdale, Iowa; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tabor, Iowa; Tidd, C. P.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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