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69 results for Lecompton Constitution:
Letter, Marcus J. Parrott to H. Miles Moore
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 12, 1857
Parrott, the representative of Kansas Territory to the U.S. Congress, wrote to Moore from Washington offering his assessment of the upcoming session of Congress. Parrott predicted that the Congress would reject the Lecompton Constitution. He also offered Moore, a Free State advocate recently elected to the Kansas Territorial House of Representatives, advice on activities to pursue in the Territorial Legislature.

Keywords: Constitutions; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; United States. Congress


Letter, B. Darrach to Rev. S. L. Adair
Authors: Darrach, Barstow
Date: June 8, 1857
Darrach, working at the New York Hospital, wrote Adair in great detail about his opinions of Gov. Walker and other political happenings in Kansas.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Darrach, Barstow; Free state cause; Lecompton Constitution; New York; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Annals of Kansas, September 1857
Authors: Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911
Date: September 1857
Includes text of the Lecompton Constitution..

Keywords: Annals of Kansas; Lecompton Constitution


Letter, T.J. Marsh to George L. Stearns
Authors: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: September 7, 1857
Nearly two months into his K.T. assignment and stay in Lawrence, Marsh reported several significant observations about the Free State Party: Governor Walker's apparent commitment to a fair canvas, the rapidly approaching territorial election (October 1857), and the money so far spent and needed for the campaign. He also observed that the Constitutional Convention was opening in Lecompton, and wrote: "If you could see the town, and people of Lecompton, and had the opportunity that I have had to witness their Plantation Manners--I think you would at once be reminded of the Scriptural inquiry, 'Can any good thing, come out of Nazareth?'"

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery supporters; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Lecompton Constitution (as printed in D.W. Wilder's Annals of Kansas (1868)).
Authors: Lecompton Constitutional Convention
Date: November 7, 1857
The Lecompton Constitution, the second constitution drafted for Kansas Territory, was written by proslavery supporters. The document permitted slavery (Article VII), excluded free blacks from living in Kansas, and allowed only male citizens of the United States to vote. There were three separate votes on the Lecompton Constitution: December 21, 1857, January 4, 1858, and August 2, 1858. In the final vote, residents of Kansas Territory rejected the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Constitutions; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Slavery


Lecompton Constitution (manuscript version)
Authors: Lecompton Constitutional Convention
Date: November 7, 1857
The Lecompton Constitution, the second constitution drafted for Kansas Territory, was written by proslavery supporters. The document permitted slavery (Article VII), excluded free blacks from living in Kansas, and allowed only male citizens of the United States to vote. There were three separate votes on the Lecompton Constitution: December 21, 1857, January 4, 1858, and August 2, 1858. In the final vote, residents of Kansas Territory rejected the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Constitutional conventions; Constitutions; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Slavery


Letter, M. [Martin] F. Conway to F. [Franklin] B. Sanborn
Authors: Conway, Martin Franklin
Date: November 16, 1857
Shortly before he was to leave Washington, D.C., for a return trip to the territory, Conway wrote Sanborn in Concord, Mass., about his disappointment at again being separated from his wife and child, but he focused most of his comments on the Lecompton machinations and his continued belief that the Free State Party had be wrong to participate in the territorial election (thus giving that government legitimacy).

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Conway, Martin Franklin; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Free State Party; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Slavery; United States. Congress


Letter, Geo. S. Boutwell to "My dear Sir" [Governor Salmon P. Chase]
Authors: Boutwell, George S.
Date: November 24, 1857
George Boutwell of Indianapolis, Indiana, wrote the governor of Ohio, Salmon P. Chase, regarding the forthcoming vote on the Lecompton Constitution--for the constitution with or without slavery. Boutwell explained why he believed the best alternative for Kansas free staters was to "abstain from voting." He asked Chase to encourage his Kansas friends to follow this course. (Chase likely forwarded this letter to Robinson.)

Keywords: Boutwell, George S.; Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Columbus, Ohio; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Free state cause; Lecompton Constitution; Slavery; United States. Congress


Letter, [U. S. Senator] H. Wilson to "Dear [Charles] Robinson"
Authors: Wilson, Henry , 1812-1875
Date: November 26, 1857
U.S. Senator Henry Wilson (1812-1875), a Republican from Massachusetts who was to become vice president of the United States in 1873, wrote Robinson from his home in Natick, Mass., regarding the Lecompton controversy. Robinson apparently had written for "advise" and Wilson simply wrote "you must look well to the position of matters and act as seems to you best." He did not believe it could pass the Congress "but if it is adopted do not fail to elect your state officers under it. Get the power if you can. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; United States. Congress. Senate; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Letter, Joseph Walker to John Dougherty
Authors: Walker, Joseph
Date: November 28, 1857
This typed letter is from Joseph Walker, Platte City, Missouri, to John Dougherty, Liberty, Missouri. The letter urges Dougherty to vote in Kansas on the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Lecompton Constitution; Voting fraud (see also Contested elections)


Letter, Gaius Jenkins to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Jenkins, Gaius
Date: November 29, 1857
From Washington, D.C., Gaius Jenkins, the man who would be shot and killed by Jim Lane on June 3, 1858, wrote Robinson regarding an business/investment issue (apparently a Wyandotte Float, perhaps involving the Quindaro land investment) of theirs before Congress, but devoted most of his letter to "the Kansas question" and "that bogus [Lecompton] constitution. Former K.T. Governor Robert J. Walker, who Jenkins "called on" in D.C., branded it "the most damnable absurdity and rong [sic] that he had ever known committed in a Republican government. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro Town Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.; Wyandot Float


Speech of Senator Douglas, of Illinois, on the President's Message
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: December 9, 1857
Senator Stephen Douglas delivered this speech in the United States Senate, responding to President Buchanan's decision to let Congress determine whether or not to admit Kansas into the Union. Douglas approved of the decision, as he believed it was not an Executive matter. Douglas reiterated the point that the members of the Lecompton Constitutional Convention were appointed to frame a sample government, subject to the approval of the Territory's citizens, not to make a government themselves. Although he disapproved of the means used to submit the Lecompton Constitution to Congress, Douglas judged that the free state government in Topeka was an unlawful legislative body.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election fraud; Free state legislature; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, James Peckham to H. Miles Moore
Authors: Peckham, James
Date: December 13, 1857
Peckham, writing from New York City, described Northern opposition to the Lecompton Constitution. He also offered advice to Moore, a Free State advocate from Leavenworth, K. T. that Free State supporters refrain from seeking the admission of Kansas as a state under the Topeka Constitution.

Keywords: Antislavery; Constitutions; Free state; Lecompton Constitution; Moore, H. Miles (Henry Miles), b. 1826; New York, New York; Peckham, James; Topeka Constitution


Jacob Collamer, Washington, D.C. to William Hutchinson
Authors: Collamer, Jacob
Date: December 17, 1857
Collamer, a U.S. senator from Vermont, cautioned Hutchinson against an attempt to establish a Kansas state government under the Topeka Constitution without the consent of Congress.

Keywords: Collamer, Jacob; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Lecompton Constitution; Topeka Constitution


Letter, Your affectionate Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: December 21, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego, in addition to elaborating on hunting and mill work, described at length the skirmishing between local free state and proslavery men, which had been continuous throughout the summer and fall. He reported the manner in which Missourians had seized and occupied lands in the absence of their owners, who were free state men. "Bogus courts" had brought the free state men who defended their lands to court, which resulted in so many fees owed that the men had to sell their land to pay them; the new owners were usually Missourians. Trego accused proslavery supporters of fabricating stories about destruction caused by warring Abolitionists in order to draw the support of the U.S. troops. Controversy over the Lecompton Constitution flourished in free state circles; the Free State Legislature in Topeka had repealed the "bogus laws" of the Territorial Legislature and appointed James Lane the head of a free state militia.

Keywords: Bogus laws; Bogus legislature; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Business enterprises; Free state legislature; Free state militia; Hunting; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Military; Mills and mill-work; Missourians; Proslavery supporters; Sharps rifles; Skirmishing; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington


Election Returns and Ballots, Fort Scott Precinct, Bourbon County, Special Election, December 21, 1857 on the Lecompton Constitution with or without slavery
Authors: Greenwood, Daniel ; Hamilton, George P.; Head, Joseph W.
Date: December 21, 1857
Election returns and actual elections ballots cast in Fort Scott Precinct, Bourbon County, Kansas Territory during the December 21, 1857, election on ratification of the Lecompton Constitution "with slavery" or the constitution "without slavery." Because a vote "for the constitution without slavery" meant Kansans could keep the slaves they already owned, free staters refused to participate. In this election, the "constitution with slavery" won 6,226 to 569. Results in Fort Scott were 318 to 19 in favor the the "constitution with slavery." Note that the largest ballot (No. 1) was signed by J. C. Head, whose name also is listed first on the election returns for Fort Scott.

Keywords: Ballot; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Elections; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Greenwood, Daniel; Hamilton, George P.; Head, J. C.; Head, Joseph W.; Lecompton Constitution


Letter, Walter Oakley, et al, to Charles Robinson
Authors: Oakley, Walter ; Ritchie, John , 1817-1887; Ross, William Wallace
Date: December 26, 1857
Walter Oakley, W. W. Ross, and John Richey wrote from Topeka to invited Robinson to attend and address the "Mass Meeting" to be held in their city on Monday, December 28, for the purpose of endorsing "the action of the Convention at Lawrence. These men and the community held Robinson in the highest "esteem" but they differed with him "upon the question of voting for state officers under the Lecompton Constitution."

Keywords: Free State Convention; Free State Party; Free state supporters; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Oakley, Walter; Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Ross, William Wallace, 1828-1889; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C. K. Holliday, et al, to Charles Robinson
Authors: Crane, Franklin L.; Dickey, Milton C.; Farnsworth, Loring ; Giles, Frye W.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 26, 1857
In this brief letter from Topeka, signed by C. K. Holiday, M. C. Dickey, F. L. Crane, Loring Farnsworth, and F. W. Giles, "Governor" Robinson was "respecfully and cordially" invited to participate in a "mass convention" at Topeka (December 28, 1857) convened "to deliberate upon the political questions of the day; and more especially upon the action of the late 'Lawrence Convention.'"

Keywords: Crane, Franklin Loomis; Dickey, Milton C.; Farnsworth, Loring; Free State Party; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Giles, Frye W.; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Topeka, Kansas


Letter, I. T. Goodnow to Friend Sherman
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: April 1 & 3, 1858
Isaac Goodnow wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to a friend, expressing his excitement and support for the Leavenworth Constitution. The status of the Lecompton Constitution was currently being debated in Congress, but Goodnow predicted its "destruction". Goodnow described the events of the Constitutional Convention, which had first convened in Minneola, but had been removed to Leavenworth. He stated that the finished constitution was" the best Constitution in existence", and remarked at James Lane's leading role in its development.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Prohibition; Topeka Constitution


Letter, Wm. Stanley to Dear [John A.] Halderman
Authors: Stanley, William
Date: January 12, 1858
Shortly after Halderman left Leavenworth for a trip east (Washington, D. C., it is nearly certain), William Stanley wrote him from Leavenworth regarding some "excitement" that had occurred there the very day Halderman left. Many were fearful of "attack" and thus the alarms were "sounded. . . . Hundreds of free state men were soon in arms, and the proslavery party exhibited more of apprehension than I have ever witnessed before." He mentions proslavery men leaving for Shawnee, the fact that many free-state men had recently been driven out of nearby Kickapoo, that John Calhoun was given a military escort to Lecompton, and his confidence that the [Lecompton] constitution would pass the Congress.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state; Free state militia; Halderman, John Adams; Kickapoo, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Proslavery; Stanley, William


Report on the result of the vote of Dec. 21, 1857 and Jan. 4, 1858 including proclamation on the official vote by acting Gov. Denver, Jan. 14, 1858
Authors: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 14, 1858


Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Elections; Lecompton Constitution


Report of the President of the Council and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas, on the result of the vote of December 21st for the Lecompton Constitution, and on the result of the election of Januray 4th under said Constitution.
Authors: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 14, 1858
This printed document reported the votes on the Lecompton Constitution from elections held on December 21, 1857, and January 4, 1858. It was prepared by G. W. Deitzler, Speaker of the House and C. W. Babcock, president of the Council of the territorial legislature. The vote showed a majority of 5,574 for the constitution with slavery but 3,012 of those votes came from areas the authors felt were sparsely settled and thus indicated fraudulent votes. The same charges of fraud applied to the election for state officials, though the free state candidates claimed a small majority in all races. The results of the vote on the Lecompton Constitution on January 4, 1858, showed a majority of 10,000 against the Lecompton Constitution as presented in a proclamation from J. W. Denver, Secretary and Acting Governor.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Deitzler, George W.; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Elections; Free state activities; Free state supporters; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery activities; Proslavery supporters


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My dear friend [Franklin B.] Sanborn
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: January 16, 1858
E. B. Whitman wrote Sanborn this lengthy letter from Lawrence, describing the political events that had unfolded in the territory since the October 5, 1857, election. Among many other things, he mentioned the split that took the "National democrats" out of the movement over the issue of participation in the state elections under the Lecompton Constitution, January 1857. This "Free State ticket" was, according to Whitman, "a disgrace to the cause," but it attracted a good number of votes and won "a good working majority in both houses and so our people proclaim a victory." Whitman, who had long been a faithful supporter, was seemingly losing confidence in John Brown, as were "the people."

Keywords: Bogus laws; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Calhoun, John; Conway, Martin Franklin; Democratic Party (U.S.); Education; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, December 1857; Elections; Free State Party; Free state legislature; Herald of Freedom; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Congress; United States. Senate; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, J. Thompson to My Dear [James W.] Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: January 29, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to James W. Denver from the U. S. Department of the Interior regarding the current debate over the Lecompton Constitution. Thompson advised Denver to stand his ground in support of it, regardless of what the President might say; "to turn aside now is downright weakness" and a show of cowardice. Thompson's opinion was that a Territorial decision to abolish slavery would be against the Dred Scott decision, and therefore unconstitutional.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; Dred Scott decision; Elmore, Rush; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Proslavery perspective; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Albert C. Morton to Mr. [Hiram] Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: January 1858
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, describing at length the efforts of Quindaro's citizens to grade a large Avenue through the town. Morton added that Quindaro was about to establish a city charter, which, if approved by the Legislature, would require the taxation of the citizens. He also mentioned a shooting the night before of a proslavery man who had lost his seat to freestatesman Charles Chadwick in a recent election under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Chadwick, Charles; Hill, Hiram; Lecompton Constitution; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Roads; Town development; Weather; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Josiah Miller to Dear Father and Mother
Authors: Miller, Josiah
Date: February 11, 1858
Josiah Miller, serving as Probate Judge for Douglas County, wrote to his Father and Mother in Illinois. He offered them more advice as to their financial investments in Kansas and their journey to the Territory. Miller commented that, even though the laws put in place by the bogus legislature had been repealed, it was "hard to tell whose laws are in force." He also voiced his support for a bill which would make accepting a position under the Lecompton Constitution a felony punishable by death.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Finance; Judges; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Miller, Josiah; Travel


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: February 15, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. S.T. asked his son for his opinion on the effect of property and emigration if the Lecompton Constitution would be passed by Congress. He also advised him on business matters and updated him on the news of family and friends back home. S.T. communicated his hope that Oscar would maintain honor and principal during his course in business, unlike the "contemptable" President Buchanan's course in politics.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Business; Business enterprises; Daily life; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lecompton Constitution; Vermont


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My Dear Friend [F. B. Sanborn ?]
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: February 18, 1858
As a follow up to his more lengthy report of January 16, Whitman wrote from Lawrence on February 18, 1858, about the turbulent course of Kansas politics during the last month. Again, he attacked Robinson's efforts to compromise with the forces behind the "Lecompton Swindle," and described the other factions plan of action should Congress adopt the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Constitutional conventions; Election, Leavenworth Constitution delegates to convention, March 1858; Free State Party; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature); Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Whitman, E. B.


Minority Report of Senator Douglas of Illinios on the Kansas-Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Douglas, Stephen
Date: February 18, 1858
Senator Stephen Douglas, as a member of the Committee on the Territories, presented this report, which analyzed the Lecompton and Topeka constitutional rivalry, for the consideration of the President. Douglas found that, under the Kansas-Nebraska Act, no government of Kansas, Territorial or otherwise, had the power to draft any constitution without the intital consent of Congress; the territories, though "self-governed" were not sovereign entities, and still were to defer to the direction of the federal government. He argued that even the recognized territorial government had no right to convene a constitutional convention without Congressional approval, and the vote the Lecompton Convention presented to the people offered no opportunity to fully reject the Lecompton Constitution, but only to accept or reject the slavery provision; a person could not vote against making Kansas a slave state unless he was also willing to vote for the Lecompton Constitution. Douglas, however, in his report likened this unauthorized act of Lecompton Constitutional Convention as much "revolution" and "treasonable pertinacity" as those actions of the free state government in Topeka; neither group held legitimate authority to draft or present their constitutions.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Free state legislature; Illinois; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Topeka Constitution; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, E. B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: February 20, 1858
This rather lengthy report from Lawrence addressed many issues, especially those surrounding the Lecompton constitutional controversy. With "the Topeka Movement . . . abandoned," the question was what would take its place to resist the Lecompton Constitution if it were accepted by the Congress. The territorial legislature had formally "protested against the admission of Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution," and "the Mass of the people are determined" to resist its imposition. Whitman went on to make many other interesting observations about the political situation, regarding Democrats and Republicans and even abolitionists: "men who seek here and now, on this issue, to break the back bone of slavery forever." In addition to the political, Whitman described his "labor of distributing the clothing . . . for the relief of Kansas," and discussed in some detail the financial situation regarding the Committee, his personal debt, and Kansas relief and support to John Brown.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Buchanan administration; Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state support; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Lucian J. Eastin to My Dear Sir [Gov. James Denver]
Authors: Eastin, Lucian J.
Date: February 20, 1858
Lucian J. Eastin, a proslavery supporter and editor of the Herald in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, wrote to Governor James Denver praising him for his efforts and congratulating him for his successes. Eastin told Denver that he feared the Lecompton Constitution would not pass, and he referred to recent incidents of election fraud. He also requested money from Denver so that he could print Denver's recent address and proclamation to the Kansas people.

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Eastin, Lucian J.; Economic conditions; Election fraud; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Newspapers; Proslavery supporters; United States. Congress


Speech of Hon. Reuben E. Fenton of New York, "The Designs of the Slave Power"
Authors: Fenton, Reuben E.
Date: February 24, 1858
Representative Reuben Fenton, of New York, delivered this speech on the floor of the House of Representatives, in reaction to the Congressional debate over the validity of the Lecompton Constitution. Believing that the repeal of the Missouri Compromise was a mistake, meant to allow the extension of slavery into the new territories, Fenton emphasized that their forefathers recognized that slavery and anti-slavery men could not coexist. Thus, under the authority outlined in the Constitution, slavery in all Territories should be abolished, in line with the Federal Government's duty to "install a government [in the Territories] conducive to the greatest degree of happiness and welfare" of its residents. Fenton did not believe that the Lecompton Constitution represented the will of Kansas' citizens, insisting that the majority, as free state supporters, were proposing no challenge to the Government constructed by the founding fathers.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Dred Scott decision; Fenton, Reuben E.; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lecompton Constitution; Missouri compromise; New York; Popular sovereignty; Slavery; Speeches, addresses, etc.


Letter, John Brown, Jr. to My Dear General [E. B.] Whitman
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: February 26, 1858
To his Kansas friend "General Whitman," John Brown Jr. wrote from his farm in Ashtabula, Ohio, regarding his continued commitment to the cause of Kansas and the state of his health. Brown wanted Whitman to know the reason for his sudden departure in October 1856: "the symptoms of mental abberation were again manifest to myself at least, and I knew that I must change scenes & circumstances, or again loose my balance entirely." But despite the hardships endured and the resulting illness, "Kansas is deguerotyped upon my heart, a stormy yet glorious picture."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Illness; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Topeka; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slavery; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, T. J. Robinson to Governor [James W. Denver]
Authors: Robinson, Thomas J.
Date: March 3, 1858
Thomas J. Robinson, writing from Washington D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, speculated that Kansas would be admitted as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Robinson suggested that Denver's future political prospects would improve from such an occurrence.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Herndon, Lou; Lecompton Constitution; Robinson, Thomas J.; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Town promotion


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to My Dear Sir [Gov. Charles Robinson]
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 3, 1858
Amos Lawrence wrote from Boston to Charles Robinson in Kansas Territory, regarding questionable ratification of the Lecompton Constitution. Lawrence advised that the best course of action to take was to "rid the territory of all traitors to the popular right", though such action should take place only if it could "avoid open hostilities altogether."

Keywords: Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Speech of Hon. James H. Hammond of South Carolina on the Admission of Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.

Keywords: Adams, Zu; Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Business enterprises; Hammond, James H.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Lecompton Constitutional Convention, September 1857; Popular sovereignty; South Carolina; Southerners; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Territorial government


Letter, Jo. P. Vaughn to Genl. [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Vaughn, John P.
Date: March 4, 1858
John P. Vaughn, writing from Sacramento, California to Governor James W. Denver, about his efforts to get the California legislature to support Kansas' admission as a state under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Vaughn, John P.


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Dear [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: March 6, 1858
This letter from Pomeroy to Hyatt was written from the Planters House hotel in Leavenworth on March 6, 1858 (not 1859, as marked) and deals with a variety of subjects, financial and political. Pomeroy began with comments on banking, property, and railroad promotion, and ends with observations about Kansas politics and the Lecompton Constitution, which he believed was finished. "Kansas is as sure to freedom as Plymouth Rock." Even if the proslave constitution passed Congress, all it would do is re-ignite the forces of freedom: "Kansas is safe to the free state party. So don't spend any more time , strength or money about it. The victory is won! . . .The millennium for the free labor interests of the Country will begin in 1860!"

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Banks and banking; Free State Party; Free labor; Greeley, Horace, 1811-1872; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroads; Squatter Sovereign; Town lots


Letter, [Samuel] Tappan to Gen. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: March 15, 1858
In this letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Samuel Tappan informed Thomas W. Higginson of the state of affairs in Kansas. He began the letter by mentioning the constitutional convention that would soon meet at Minneola, and the hope that the free state side will be triumphant. Tappan also mentioned the recent election for mayor of Lawrence, stating that Carmi Babcock won over James Blood. The last page, tacked on as if it were a separate note, gave a brief summary of where influential leaders were currently located, so Higginson would know of their whereabouts.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Blood, James; Branscomb, Charles H.; Constitutional conventions; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state perspective; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Roberts, William Young; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913


Letter, H. J. Marshall to Governor [James] Denver
Authors: Marshall, H.J.
Date: March 15, 1858
H. J. Marshall wrote from Washington, D. C. to Governor Denver regarding recent Congressional proceedings. Marshall supposed that the Lecompton Constitution would be defeated, and that the election returns of the past January 4 would be thrown out due to fraudulent activities. He also expressed the majority support for Denver's proclamation of February 26, which denied James Lane's authority to organize the territorial militia, and "show[ed] the base conduct of the same and his party of out-laws."

Keywords: Calhoun, John; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Election fraud; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Marshall, H.J.; United States. Congress


Speech of Hon. John Crittenden of Kentucky on the Admission of the State of Kansas
Authors: Crittenden, John
Date: March 17, 1858
John J. Crittenden, a Senator of Kentucky, delivered this speech, which addressed the debate over Kansas Territory's admission to the Union under the Lecompton Constitution, on the floor of the Senate. Crittenden, himself a Southerner, contended that there was enough evidence to indicate that the Constitution that had been submitted was not well supported by the citizens of Kansas Territory, and proposed an idea which would become known as the "Crittenden Amendment" which called for the ratification of the whole Lecompton Constitution by a popular vote in the Territory before Kansas could be admitted as a state under it.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Crittenden Amendment; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Election fraud; Kansas Nebraska Act; Lecompton Constitution; Popular sovereignty; Slavery


Letter, Brad [A. G. Bradford] to [Governor James H.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: March 18, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James H. Denver, suggested that the effort to admit Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution likely would fail in the U.S. Congress. Bradford also sought Denver's support for his attempt to receive an appointment as Superintendent of Indian Affairs and commented upon Denver's future political opportunities in California.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; Calhoun, John; California; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Lecompton Constitution; Patronage, political; Washington, D.C.


Jacob Collamer, Washington, D. C. to William Hutchinson
Authors: Collamer, Jacob
Date: March 23, 1858
Collamer, a U. S. senator from Vermont, responded to a request from Hutchinson for assistance in a plan to speculate in land on the Delaware Indian reservation in Kansas Territory. Collamer informed Hutchinson that it did not appear that the anticipated treaty with the Delaware would be negotiated during the current session of Congress.

Keywords: Collamer, Jacob; Delaware Indians; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Land speculation; Lecompton Constitution


Remonstrance of the Constitution Convention against the passage of the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Winchell, James M., 1823-1877
Date: March 30, 1858
Letter written to the United States Congress which points out many reasons why Congress should not accept the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Congress (See United States. Congress); Emery, James Stanley; Foster, Charles A.; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; United States. Congress; Walden, John Morgan; Winchell, J. M.


Letter, Brad. [A. J. Bradford] to [Governor James W.] Denver
Authors: Bradford, A. G.
Date: April 1, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported upon the U.S. House of Representative's passage of the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, which proposed to resubmit the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Bradford predicted, however, that a House-Senate conference committee would endorse the Senate's version of the Lecompton Constitution bill, which proposed the admission of Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Bradford added that he believed both houses of Congress would agree to admit Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Bradford, A. G.; California; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Lecompton Constitution; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Journal, Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, April 2, 1858
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: April 2, 1858
After considering a few other issues, such as the selection of Topeka as "the temporary seat of Government," the convention took up the motion from the previous day on the elective franchise, with T. D. Thacher explaining that his select committee had considered the insertion of the word "white" and "unanimously report against its insertion." After some debate over procedure, Thacher offered an amendment that instructed the first legislature to put "the question of universal suffrage to the people at the general elections." The amendment passed, 50 to 29.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Capitals (cities); Constitutions; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Roberts, William Young; Suffrage; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [O. E. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: April 3, 1858
S.T. Learnard, a farmer and occasional state legislator from Bakersfield, Vermont, wrote from Granville, Ohio, to his son, Oscar E. Learnard, in Kansas Territory. S.T. Learnard requested that his son meet him upon his arrival in Lawrence. He also referred to the defeat of the Lecompton Constitution in the U. S. House of Representatives, a move which he dubbed "a victory for freedom."

Keywords: Free state perspective; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lecompton Constitution; Travel; United States. Congress. House


Address of the Constitutional Convention to American Public
Authors: Address committee. John Morgan Walden, James Fletcher, et al
Date: April 3, 1858
A committee made up of John M. Walden, James Fletcher, Thomas Ewing, Jr., Isaac T. Goodnow, Henry J. Adams, T. Dwight Thacher, and Addison Danford prepared this eleven-page manuscript "address to accompany the instrument" adopted at the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. The statement essentially laid out the philosophical foundations and rationale for the new document. It argued that the facts showed the overwhelming majority of Kansans desired admission as a free state.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Danford, Addison; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fletcher, James; Free State Party; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery activities; Slave power; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Walden, John Morgan


Letter, Thos. A Hendricks to Dear Sir [Gov. James W. Denver]
Authors: Hendricks, Thomas A.
Date: April 3, 1858
Thomas Hendricks wrote from Washington D. C. to Governor James Denver in Lecompton, Kansas Territory, providing his reaction to news of recent events in Kansas Territory. Hendricks referred to James Lane's duel challenge to Denver, and advised Denver to "give him a thrashing" should he have trouble with Lane again. Hendricks expressed his wish that the "Kansas question" should be resolved as soon as possible, and he speculated on the outcome of the bill in Congress which proposed the recognition of the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Brindle, William; Crittenden Amendment; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; United States. Congress


Letter, R. S. Stevens to J. W. Denver
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 3, 1858
Robert S. Stevens, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported upon the U.S. House of Representative's passage of the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, which proposed to resubmit the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. While Stevens, and by implication Denver, supported the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, he contended that it was in the Democratic Party's best interests for Kansas to be admitted under the Lecompton Constitution. Stevens also commented on his efforts to get New York Indian lands in Kansas opened to preemption.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Democratic Party (U.S.); Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Land sales; Lecompton Constitution; Native Americans; New York Indian Reserve; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Congress


Address of the Kanzas Constitutional Convention to the American Public
Authors: Walden, John Morgan
Date: April 3, 1858
Leavenworth Constitution (?) address to accompany the constitution as it was distributed to the public, 15,000 copies in English and 2000 in German. It was very biased against the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Antislavery; Conway, Martin Franklin; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state perspective; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Leavenworth Constitution; Lecompton Constitution; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Thacher, Timothy D., 1831-1894; Walden, John Morgan


Letter, E. B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 13, 1858
Whitman wrote a rather lengthy update on the Kansas situation for Stearns, focusing on the political machinations of the previous few and the uncertain situation created by the Lecompton debate. Of territorial leadership, Whitman observed: "While Kansas is blessed with many of the truest men of the age, men who are fully up to the emergency, she is also cursed with some of the most unprincipled demagogues that ever afflicted any country." There was much confusion and disagreement about the best course of action for free state men to take, now that many acknowledge the death of the Topeka movement. He then turned to the work of the Minneola/Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March 1858.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free State Party; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); United States. Congress; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, R. S. Stevens to My Dear Sir [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 25, 1858
Robert S. Stevens, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported that Congress had passed the English Bill, which essentially resubmitted the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Stevens predicted that Kansans would vote against it and that Kansas' admission as a state would be delayed until at least 1860. Stevens commented that legislators in Washington failed to understand "the real situation in Kansas," particularly the strength of the antislavery group in the territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; English Bill; Lecompton Constitution; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Congress


Letter, E. B. Whitman to Geo. L. Stearns Esq.
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: April 30, 1858
Whitman's April 30, 1858, letter to Stearns described the harmonious work conducted by the "State Convention" and its nomination of state officers under the Leavenworth Constitution. That movement, he told Stearns, would probably not "amount to much if the Lecompton Constitution is rejected. He also mentioned continued tension in Bourbon County and the route of U.S. troops by "the free State boys" of Fort Scott.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free State Convention; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Territorial government; United States. Army; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Galusha A. Grow to Gov. C. Robinson
Authors: Grow, Galusha Aaron
Date: May 5, 1858
Congressman Galusha Aaron Grow, a Pennsylvania Republican, wrote Robinson regarding the Lecompton debate and the need to get a large free state vote against that proposed constitution. If it were "the dough faces will be exterminated next fall."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; English Bill; Grow, Galusha Aaron; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery supporters; United States. Congress


Letter, [C. Robinson] to "My Dear Sir" [Henry Wilson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 12, 1858
This important document is reportedly a copy of a letter from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, May 12, 1858, to Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson in which the Kansas governor expresses confidence that the Lecompton Constitution will be overwhelmingly defeated in the upcoming election and makes numerous observations about the state of politics--present and future--in Kansas. Robinson believed that half the Democrats would oppose the Lecompton instrument because they knew that freestaters would dominate any state government that would be admitted under it and subsequently "the Constitution would be changed in the 'twinkling of an eye.'" Thus, he predicted no Kansas admission until at least December 1859, and in the meantime expected Democrats to "take the lead in aiding in developing the resources of Kansas, & [the Democratic Party] will claim to be the special friends of our infant State."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Election, Lecompton Constitution, August 1857; English Bill; Factionalism; Free State Party; Free state supporters; Journals; Lecompton Constitution; Partisan press; Press and politics; Press and propaganda; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Letter, Isaac T. Goodnow to Hon. Eli Thayer
Authors: Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894
Date: May 24, 1858
Isaac T. Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Goodnow asked Thayer for his support for Bluemont Central College (predecessor to Kansas State University), a college chartered near Manhattan which would have "an Agricultural Department of a most thorough practical character." Goodnow asserted that "now when the victory [for free staters] in the main is won" it was time to focus attention on schools and churches.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Education; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Lecompton Constitution; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Universities and colleges


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: June 9, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. S.T. mentioned his recent trip to Illinois and his efforts to obtain land warrants. He also requested that Oscar send him word on the status of his crops and mill, as his own friends were urging him to stay in business in Vermont. The author also referred to the upcoming August vote in which the English Bill, which essentially re-submitted the once-rejected proslavey Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory, would be approved or rejected by popular sovereignty.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Business enterprises; Daily life; English Bill; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Vermont


Letter, M. F. Conway to My dear Sir [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Conway, Martin Franklin
Date: June 13, 1858
Somewhat disturbed that Stearns of Boston had published his (Conway's) letter regarding "money for the Leavenworth Constitution," Martin F. Conway, Lawrence, wrote to say that there was nothing "improper or dishonorable in this transaction" and went on to reflect on the nature of the Free State Party/movement at that time. Charles Robinson was "at work to destroy the influence of the Republican wing of the Free State Party," but people back East should not conclude "that the bottom is going to fall out of Kansas because there is division in the Free State Party." Conway expected both Robinson and James H. Lane to fall from prominence because of changing circumstances in Kansas.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Free State Party; Free state cause; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, J. [John] S. [Stillman] Brown to Dear Willie
Authors: Brown, John S.
Date: June 13, 1858
This letter, written from Lawrence by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son William, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins. Brown also mentioned a sermon he preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.

Keywords: Brown, John S.; Churches; Community life; Jenkins, Gaius; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitution; Lecompton Constitution; Nute, Ephraim; Religion; Unitarian churches; Weather


Public Meeting At __________, John M. Walden speaker
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 1858
Generic broadside regarding Walden speaking about the Lecompton Constitution. Walden was former editor of Quindaro Chindowan.

Keywords: Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro Chindowan; Walden, John Morgan


Letter, M. Brimmer to M. F. Conway
Authors: Brimmer, Martin
Date: July 16, 1858
Martin Brimmer, member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company Executive Committee, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Brimmer asked Conway for advice on whether the Company should start offering to sell town lots and shares on terms requiring a cash down payment and the balance paid over a period of months. Previously, the Company had required a cash payment for the entire cost of the town share or lot. Brimmer also speculated speculating that Kansans would vote against the Lecompton Constitution in the upcoming August 1858 election.

Keywords: Brimmer, Martin; Conway, Martin Franklin; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Election, Lecompton Constitution, August 1857; Emigrant aid companies; Land acquisition; Land sales; Leavenworth Constitution; Lecompton Constitution; Loans; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Real estate; Town lots; Town shares


Letter, John McCannon to Col. Jas. B. Abbott
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: July 24, 1858
John McCannon, who had once served as Quartermaster for the Kansas free state militia, wrote from Little Osage, Kansas Territory, to James Abbott in Lawrence. McCannon reported that peace reigned in the area in the wake of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre of the past May. Referring to the current Constitutional controversy, he proclaimed, "Lecompton can not live on the Osage", as there were not enough proslavery supporters in the area to approve it were it put to a popular vote. McCannon did not seem to be concerned that U.S. Troops had recently arrived at Fort Scott, for reasons unknown to him, as local towns thrived and crops flourished.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Coal; Crops; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Gristmills; Lebanon, Kansas Territory; Lecompton Constitution; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; McCannon, John; Military; Sawmills; Timber; Town development


Letter, A. C. Morton to Mr. Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: August 3, 1858
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton had recently returned to Quindaro in order to vote on the Lecompton Constitution as submitted by the English bill. Having arrived there, he found the place to be "dull". Morton described many empty houses and buildings, left behind from settlers selling out to return home; money had also been lost in investments and bridges were washed out in floods. However, the Town Company had invested in a flour mill, which had commenced operations. Morton also discussed matters of buying and selling land warrants with Hill.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; English Bill; Hill, Hiram; Lecompton Constitution; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Voting


Pamphlet, Report of the Committee on Federal Relations Relative to the Admission of Kansas Into the Federal Union
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
This pamphlet includes the Resolutions proposed by the Texas Legislature's "Committee on Federal Relations relative to the Admission of Kansas into the Federal Union", produced in response to the Congressional debate whether or not to adopt Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. This document proposed that Kansas be adopted into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution as it was, supporting slavery or not, and have Kansans amend the document later as necessary. The intention of the Texas Legislature was to remove the Kansas question from the national platform, for they feared that Congressmen from Northern States, acting in their own interests, would never vote to adopt another proslavery territory into statehood.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Speech, Fellow Citizens--Opposing the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: c. 1858
This hand-written speech appeared to be another by John Alexander Martin, seemingly composed for delivery in the spring and/or early summer of 1858, not long after he took over Atchison's Squatter Sovereign and renamed it Freedom's Champion. Here the speaker aimed his attack at the Buchanan administration and the English Bill, and the renewed attempt to pass the Lecompton Constitution at a referendum scheduled for August 2, 1858, and thus overturn the free-state victory that had already been won. The speaker seemed confident it would be defeated, as the constitution itself had been in January but hoped for an overwhelming vote against (perhaps as many as 15,000).

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Constitutions; English Bill; Free labor; Lecompton Constitution; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slave power; Slavery; Squatter sovereignty


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 11, 1859
Marcus Parrott wrote from the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott. Marcus told his brother of his experience in Washington: "awfully dull, nothing like an exciting party or an interesting debate thus far". He discussed to his social life and upcoming trips to Cuba, and also to Boston to meet with the Directors of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Marcus did elaborate on one message that had been clearly communicated to him in the House: that opponents of the "Lecompton party" were not encouraged to unite.

Keywords: Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Ewing, Hugh Boyle; Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Stringfellow, Benjamin F.; United States. Congress. House; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.


Speech, Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: c. July 1859
This eleven-page document was a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution, which was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention which finished its work at the end of July. Thus, this speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat this latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September 1859. It covered the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat it at the polls and stressed that in light of actions of "a servile judiciary" slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); English Bill; Free state constitutions; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Lecompton Constitution; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Missouri compromise; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Scott, Dred; Slave power; Slavery; Squatter sovereignty; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


Letter, C. Robinson to "Dear Madam" [Emma Willard]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to Willard's letter of March 22, Robinson wrote from Quindaro that he was "gratified" to learn of her interest in Kansas history and that she was "disposed to examine for yourself the random thrusts of the press." Robinson went on to make some interesting observations regarding his interpretation of Kansas events and the importance of the various factions, free state and proslavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Kansas question; Law and Order Party; Lecompton Constitution; Millard, Emma; Proslavery; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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