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20 results for Kansas question:
Letter, J. Z. Goodrich to Dear Sir
Authors: Goodrich, J. Z.
Date: June 29, 1854
This printed letter, on letterhead from the House of Representatives in Washington, D. C., was written by John Zacheus Goodrich, a representative from Massachusetts. He informed the recipient that members of Congress and regular citizens of the city had formed the Union Emigration Society--these citizens opposed both the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and the opening of the territories to slavery. It included details about the Missouri Compromise, the designs of Slave Power, and stated that "our watchword is Constitutional Freedom everywhere within the jurisdiction of the United States."

Keywords: Antislavery; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Goodrich, J. Z.; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas question; Missouri compromise; Nebraska Territory; Sectionalism (United States); Slave power; Slavery; United States. Congress. House


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus, on a political trip to discuss the 'Kansas Question" with members of the U.S. Congress, told him that the "dead-lock in the House has paralyzed [Washington] society" and that social engagements had been "quiet". He wrote Edwin of his surprise to hear an abolitionist speech as a Sunday sermon, and of his desire to speak with Tom Hendricks, Commissioner of the Land Office, regarding the prospective decline in availability of land warrants.

Keywords: Kansas question; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: January 26, 1856
Marcus Parrot wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother, Edwin Parrott, in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus, on a political trip to discuss the 'Kansas Question" with members of the U.S. Congress, told him that the "dead-lock in the House has paralyzed [Washington] society" and that social engagements had been "quiet". He wrote Edwin of his surprise to hear an abolitionist speech as a Sunday sermon, and of his desire to speak with Tom Hendricks, Commissioner of the Land Office, regarding the prospective decline in availability of land warrants.

Keywords: Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Real estate investment; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; Violence


Letter, Marc [Parrott] to Dear Edd [Edwin Parrott]
Authors: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: February 11, 1856
Marcus Parrott wrote from Washington, D.C., to his brother Edwin Parrott in Dayton, Ohio. Marcus described his experiences mixing his social engagements with politics, having to navigate through discussions with members of different parties. He mentioned the distrust he had for certain acquaintances that were also active in the government, and seemed frustrated by his only modestly successful attempts to discuss the Kansas question with them.

Keywords: Iverson, Alfred; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Medill, William; National politics; Parrott, Edwin A.; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shoemaker, Tom C.; United States. Congress; Washington, D.C.


Letter, N. P. Banks to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Banks, Nathaniel Prentice, 1816-1894
Date: March 19, 1856
U. S. Congressman Nathaniel P. Banks of Massachusetts wrote Robinson from Washington on March 19, 1856, to forward John Fremont's letter (see document, #101103) and to encourage that letter's publication in Kansas Territory. The newly elected speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives believed Fremont was a good friend of Kansas and that he would make a solid, electable candidate for president. Banks also wrote that he was "hopeful the Kansas question will meet its first decision in the House this week." He was confident something positive would be done for the cause. (Perhaps he was speaking of the Howard Committee, which was authorized that very day.)

Keywords: Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894; Congressional Report 200 (see also Howard Committee); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Kansas question; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. House; Washington, D.C.


Resolutions, State of Maine
Authors: Maine. House of Representatives; Maine. Senate
Date: April 23, 1856
The full title of this document was "State of Maine Resolves relating to the extension of slavery, the territory of Kansas, and secret political associations." The state legislature of Maine issued this statement listing their five resolutions about the state of affairs in Kansas Territory. The state legislature was against the expansion of slavery and they wanted the fate of Kansas Territory to be decided by the people living in the territory, without outside interference from hostile political organizations. The document was signed by Josiah S. Little of Maine's House of Representatives, Lot. M. Morrill of the Senate, and Samuel Wells of the Secretary's Office. Caleb Ayer certified that this copy of the original document was fully accurate.

Keywords: Antislavery; Antislavery perspective; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas question; Maine; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas)


Articles of Association
Authors: Proslavery Association of Clay County, Missouri
Date: June 7, 1856
Written document concerning the formation of a organization in Missouri with the purpose of making Kansas a slave state. Includes the purpose of the organization and three articles.

Keywords: Kansas question; Missouri; Money; Proslavery; Proslavery activities; Proslavery prospects; Proslavery support


Speech, Gerritt Smith to the Kansas Convention
Authors: Smith, Gerrit
Date: July 10, 1856
This speech was made by Gerritt Smith to a meeting of the Kansas Convention in Buffalo, New York. In this speech, he argued in support of various resolutions related to border ruffianism in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Antislavery; Bogus legislature; Border ruffians; Kansas question; Missouri compromise; Missourians; Smith, Gerritt; Violence; Voting fraud (see also Contested elections)


Letter, O. E. L[earnard] to Dear Father [S. T. Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: August 10, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote from Lawrence of his continued commitment to the "Sacked City," insisting that he would not be "bullied or frightened" by those committing outrages in Kansas Territory. He commented on the political composition of the territory and Lawrence, where he found many Douglas Democrats. Although there were some "fanatics" and "abolitionists," most residents of Lawrence were "western men" who had been driven to oppose the administration by the outrages. He insisted that the significance of the New England Emigrant Company had been exaggerated and that although more violent confrontations were likely, Kansas would eventually be free.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Douglas Democrats; Dragoons; Free State Party; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pierce administration; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Smith, Persifer F.


Letter, A. S. Harris to Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Harris, A S.
Date: September 22, 1856
A.S. Harris wrote from New York to Thaddeus Hyatt regarding an article in the Journal of Commerce that dealt with the upcoming Presidential election and the strife in Kansas. The article included a rather lengthy attack on emigrant aid societies.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Free state perspective; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas question; United States. Constitution


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: January 4, 185[7]
From Topeka, shortly after the end of his imprisonment, John Kagi wrote his sister in Bristol, Ohio, a mostly personal letter to say he was eager to return for a short visit, but, he wrote, "I love Kansas [???] than ever, and feel more like laboring with my whole soul's strength for the triumph of her rights."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas question; Ohio; Topeka Tribune; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Eli Thayer to Capt. [John] Brown
Authors: Thayer, Eli , 1819-1899
Date: March 30, 1857
Thayer, the president of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote Brown from his home in Worcester, Mass., that he (Thayer) and his associates had "not the remotest idea of relinquishing Kansas" and that he would send Brown $50. Thayer also asked when Brown planned to visit Worcester.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Kansas question; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


Letter, S. G. Hubbard to John Brown Esq.
Authors: Hubbard, S. G.
Date: October 6, 1857
S. G. Hubbard, a New Haven, Connecticut, supporter, wrote regarding one of Brown's political tracts, the impossibility of fund raising for the cause during this time of financial crisis, the prospects for a Free State victory in the previous day's election, and the president's recent action that "committed the [Democratic] party to the extremist doctrines of Slavery extension & Slavery Nationalization."

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Buchanan administration; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free state support; Hubbard, S. G.; Kansas question; New Haven, Connecticut; Panic of 1857; Slave power


Letter, Gaius Jenkins to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Jenkins, Gaius
Date: November 29, 1857
From Washington, D.C., Gaius Jenkins, the man who would be shot and killed by Jim Lane on June 3, 1858, wrote Robinson regarding an business/investment issue (apparently a Wyandotte Float, perhaps involving the Quindaro land investment) of theirs before Congress, but devoted most of his letter to "the Kansas question" and "that bogus [Lecompton] constitution. Former K.T. Governor Robert J. Walker, who Jenkins "called on" in D.C., branded it "the most damnable absurdity and rong [sic] that he had ever known committed in a Republican government. . . ."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; Quindaro Town Company; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869; Washington, D.C.; Wyandot Float


General Lane's answer to the President's message
Authors: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866
Date: February 13, 1858
Address by General Lane in response to the President's message about Lane and Kansas. Lane rebukes the President's message about him and Kansas. Described the many elections that Kansas had gone through and the intrusion of Missourians into Kansas to rig the elections.

Keywords: Adams, Henry J.; Antislavery; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, January 1858; Election, Topeka Constitution, August 1857; Kansas Nebraska Act; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence Republican; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature)


Letter, John Brown, Jr. to My Dear General [E. B.] Whitman
Authors: Brown, Jr., John
Date: February 26, 1858
To his Kansas friend "General Whitman," John Brown Jr. wrote from his farm in Ashtabula, Ohio, regarding his continued commitment to the cause of Kansas and the state of his health. Brown wanted Whitman to know the reason for his sudden departure in October 1856: "the symptoms of mental abberation were again manifest to myself at least, and I knew that I must change scenes & circumstances, or again loose my balance entirely." But despite the hardships endured and the resulting illness, "Kansas is deguerotyped upon my heart, a stormy yet glorious picture."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Illness; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Topeka; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slavery; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Thos. A Hendricks to Dear Sir [Gov. James W. Denver]
Authors: Hendricks, Thomas A.
Date: April 3, 1858
Thomas Hendricks wrote from Washington D. C. to Governor James Denver in Lecompton, Kansas Territory, providing his reaction to news of recent events in Kansas Territory. Hendricks referred to James Lane's duel challenge to Denver, and advised Denver to "give him a thrashing" should he have trouble with Lane again. Hendricks expressed his wish that the "Kansas question" should be resolved as soon as possible, and he speculated on the outcome of the bill in Congress which proposed the recognition of the Lecompton Constitution.

Keywords: Brindle, William; Crittenden Amendment; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Hendricks, Thomas A.; Kansas question; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; United States. Congress


Pamphlet, Report of the Committee on Federal Relations Relative to the Admission of Kansas Into the Federal Union
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
This pamphlet includes the Resolutions proposed by the Texas Legislature's "Committee on Federal Relations relative to the Admission of Kansas into the Federal Union", produced in response to the Congressional debate whether or not to adopt Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution. This document proposed that Kansas be adopted into statehood under the Lecompton Constitution as it was, supporting slavery or not, and have Kansans amend the document later as necessary. The intention of the Texas Legislature was to remove the Kansas question from the national platform, for they feared that Congressmen from Northern States, acting in their own interests, would never vote to adopt another proslavery territory into statehood.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Kansas question; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Popular sovereignty; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; United States. Congress; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, L. Maria Child to Capt. [John] Brown
Authors: Child, Lydia Maria Francis , 1802-1880
Date: October 26, 1859
Lydia Maria Child, "an earnest friend of Kansas," wrote John Brown from Wayland, Mass., on October 26, 1859, regarding her opposition to violence but her admiration for his courage and commitment to the cause of freedom. She had hoped to come to his aid in prison, but in the meantime assured Brown "that no honest man ever shed his blood for freedom in vain, however much he may be mistaken in his efforts."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Child, Lydia Maria Francis, 1802-1880; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Kansas question


Letter, C. Robinson to "Dear Madam" [Emma Willard]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to Willard's letter of March 22, Robinson wrote from Quindaro that he was "gratified" to learn of her interest in Kansas history and that she was "disposed to examine for yourself the random thrusts of the press." Robinson went on to make some interesting observations regarding his interpretation of Kansas events and the importance of the various factions, free state and proslavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Free state cause; Kansas question; Law and Order Party; Lecompton Constitution; Millard, Emma; Proslavery; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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