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14 results for Kansas City, Missouri:
Letter, [Samuel Adair] to Bro. [S. S.] Jocelyn
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: November 16, 1854
Samuel Adair and his family had just arrived in Kansas City, MO. He wrote to S. S. Jocelyn of the American Missionary Society. He described poor conditions for settlers in Kansas Territory, his and his wife's illnesses, the doctor who treated them owned slaves, etc. This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; American Missionary Society; Illness; Jocelyn, S. S.; Kansas City, Missouri; Physicians; Slaveholders


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: September 4, 1855
In Scott Co., Iowa ("about 4 miles West of the Mississippi"), on his way to Kansas Territory, John Brown wrote the family to say all was well despite some delays caused by their freight in Chicago and a sick horse. Brown commented mostly on the nature of there journey to date and some miscellaneous business matters.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Oliver; Brown, Watson, 1835-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Iowa; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Travel


Letter, S. C. [Samuel Clarke] Pomeroy to Sir
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: October 10, 1855
Pomeroy, writing from Kansas City, informed a New England Emigrant Aid Company representative that he had drawn on Mr. L. (probably Amos Lawrence) for $1000 and Mr. Haskins for $300 to pay for construction work on mills and hotels in Kansas Territory. Pomeroy emphasized that he would reduce spending after completion of the mills and hotels.

Keywords: Construction; Economic development; Hotels; Kansas City, Missouri; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Mills and mill-work; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891


Letter, S. N. Simpson to Mr Hiram Hill
Authors: Simpson, Samuel Newell
Date: November 20, 1855
S. N. Simpson wrote from Kansas City, Missouri to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, where Edmund Jones had recently returned (see Hill's letter to Jones of October 11, 1855). Simpson described development and rising property values in Lawrence. He detailed his attempts to collect rent from Mrs. Hall, who had cleaned in exchange for a month's rent. In language reminiscent of documents from the American Revolution, the last paragraph declared that Kansas could but would not break ties with the United States, partly because Kansas needed financial assistance. As evidence, Simpson asked Hill for church-building funds.

Keywords: Domestics; Hill, Hiram; Jones, Edmund; Kansas City, Missouri; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Rent; Simpson, H.M; Town development; Town lots; Women


Letter, Nelson Rusk to Mr. [William] Barnes
Authors: Rusk, Nelson
Date: April 26, 1856
Nelson Rusk, writing from Kansas City, Missouri, described for William Barnes, secretary of the New York State Kansas Committee, some of the difficulties he experienced during his journey to Kansas with a party of settlers from New York. Rusk also offered his opinion that the New York party would fail in its effort to establish a cohesive colony in Kansas due to ineffective leadership and selfishness among the settlers.

Keywords: Albany Colony; Barnes, William, 1824-1913; Emigration and immigration; Kansas City, Missouri; Migration, internal; New York State Kansas Committee; Rusk, Nelson


Letter, George Washington Brown to his mother
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: May 13, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. Writing to his mother on the day before his arrest, Brown expressed concern that his life could be in danger. He instructed his mother to use his estate to provide support for the Herald of Freedom.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Free state cause; Herald of Freedom; Journalism; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Newspapers; Prisoners


George Washington Brown to Mr. Fowler
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: May 13, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. Written from Kansas City, Missouri, to a friend on the day before his arrest, Brown expressed concern that his life could be in danger. He enclosed an outline for a "Documentary History of Kansas" and asked Fowler to publish a book based on the outline.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Free state cause; Herald of Freedom; Journalism; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Newspapers; Prisoners; Treason


Letter, [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: October 16, 1857
Joseph H. Trego wrote from his cabin in Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife Alice in Rock Island, Illinois, about his journey from Kansas City to Sugar Mound. His friends, Thomas Ellwood Smith (Ell) and his brother Edwin (Ed), and himself were poorly prepared as they expected to stay in public houses during the journey, not camp outside as their wagon transportation preferred. As the road they took went right down the Missouri state line, Trego contrasted the well-established farms to the East with the "open, wild prairie" to the West. He and his brother, upon arriving at their cabin, found that they had "Hoosier" neighbors (from Indiana), who were pleasant but proslavery. Trego recounted the difficulty they had acquiring home furnishings and food, fighting adverse weather at every turn. He spoke at length of how he was comforted by writing to his wife, as he and his friends greatly missed their families.

Keywords: Daily life; Domestics; Hunting; Kansas City, Missouri; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes River; Merchandise; Proslavery supporters; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Transportation; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; Wagons; Weather


Letter, John Vansickle to Dear Sir
Authors: Vansickle, John H.
Date: July 18, 1858
John Vansickle, recently married, wrote from Kansas City, Missouri, where he was purchasing goods and provisions with his wife for their new home. Vansickle communicated the prospect of a good crop this season, along with details referring to the upcoming Lecompton Constitution ratification election and the Marais des Cygnes Massacre, which occurred the past May. He also encouraged the recipient of this letter to come to Kansas Territory for a visit and gave news of his encounter with various friends when in St. Louis.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Crops; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Farmers; Gold mines and mining; Kansas City, Missouri; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Merchandise; Montgomery County, Kansas Territory; Vansickle, John H.


Letter, J. J. I. [John J. Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: October 5, 1858
In this first, rather lengthy letter from Sumner, K.T., Ingalls recorded his "impressions" of St. Louis, Missouri, and detailed the combination rail and steamboat trip across Missouri to Kansas Territory. St. Louis had "a hasty, unfinished appearance," from Ingalls's perspective, and "So much filth and poverty. . . ." He was delighted to leave that city and soon road the "Pacific Railroad" as far as Herman, Missouri, where he boarded the steamer "Duncan S. Carter," which is described in some detail, along with the trip up river. Ingalls arrived at his Kansas destination on Monday, October 4, 1858.

Keywords: Immigrants; Jefferson City, Missouri; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri River; Pacific railroads; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Transportation


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 19, 1858
The focus of this letter from Lawrence to Robinson in Washington, D.C., was the effort underway in Lawrence and Douglas County to attract a railroad and to have it built south of the Kansas River. Leavenworth, Kansas City, and Lawrence were obviously in the midst of their battle to gain advantage on the transportation front, and the decisions being made in Washington at that time with respect to land grants were vital to their future interests.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Jayhawkers; Johnnycake, Charles; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 6, 1859
From Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson wrote his wife back home in Lawrence regarding land and railroad issues that he was working on behalf of in the capital. Robinson briefly addresses issues having to do with Indian land disputes, but focuses even more on the competition for railroads being fought out in Washington between Lawrence, Leavenworth, and Kansas City. ". . . Lawrence must fight its own battles . . . . I hope to be able to make Lawrence a point on both roads before we get through." [For more information on this battle over railroads, see I. E. Quastler, "Charting a Course: Lawrence, Kansas, and Its Railroad Strategy, 1854-1872," Kansas History 18 (Spring 1995): 18-33. For a time, civic and business leaders sought to make Lawrence the regional rail center with an aggressive promotion's plan, but they ultimately, and perhaps inevitably, lost the prize to Kansas City; this piece is largely drawn from the author's 1979 book-length study, The Railroads of Lawrence.]

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian floats; Jenkins, Gaius; Kansas City, Missouri; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; School lands; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs; United States. General Land Office


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: July 5, 1859
On the first day of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas, with observation on the city and the nature of the convention, which he considered "not a very superior one." Nevertheless, the Republicans had a big majority, and Ingalls was "on some of the most important committees in the convention and shall be obliged to do some hard work."

Keywords: Celebrations; Democratic Party (U.S.); Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, L. F. Parsons to "Dear Friends Redpath & Hinton"
Authors: Parsons, Luke F.
Date: December 1859
Parsons, "a soldier under John Brown" in Kansas, who fought in the battles of Black Jack and Osawatomie (see, Twenty-fifth Biennial Report, KSHS, 135-136), wrote this letter from Osawatomie to James Redpath and Richard J. Hinton in response to their "notice in the Republican in regard to publishing the life of John Brown & associates at Harpers Ferry & your request for information." In addition to his Kansas activities, Parsons was with Brown and company in Iowa during the winter of 1857-58 and mentions, as did Kagi and others, the "Lyceums" conducted by Brown around their evening campfires and the "thorough course of military instruction under Col. Whipple as Drillmaster." Parsons, who was obviously proud of his association with Brown, apparently just missed being in on the Harpers Ferry raid--he had returned to KT during the long wait and was not recalled.

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Owen; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Coppoc, Barclay; Coppoc, Edwin; Forbes, Hugh; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas City Metropolitan; Kansas City, Missouri; Leeman, William H.; Moffett, Charles; Osawatomie, Battle of; Parsons, Luke F.; Pate, Henry Clay; Quakers (see Society of Friends); Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Rice, Benjamin; Springdale, Iowa; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tabor, Iowa; Tidd, C. P.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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