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24 results for Kagi, John Henry:
Letter, J. H. Kagi to "Dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 4, 1856
From Topeka, Kagi wrote his father about his (Kagi's) personal situation and more generally about the civil war in Kansas. Several thousand "armed Missourians" had been committing outrages against free state citizens with the support of proslave leaders--Wilson Shannon, Samuel Lecompte, and Daniel Woodson. Freestaters, according to Kagi, were just then mounting an effective defense of both Lawrence and Topeka, both primary targets of the proslavery forces--"the enemy are determined to 'wipe out', as they say, both these towns."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Free state cause; Kagi, John Henry; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompte, Samuel D. (Samuel Dexter), 1814-1888; Militia; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Woodson, Daniel


Letter, J. K. [John Kagi] to My Dear Sisters
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: November 20, 1856
Killed during John Brown's Harpers Ferry raid in October 1859, John Henry Kagi, sometimes known as Brown's "Secretary of War," was "in prison at Lecompton" when he wrote this letter to his sister on November 20, 1856. Kagi, along with John Ritchie and several other free-state partisans, had been arrested by U.S. Marshal I.B. Donelson, supported by federal troops, on September 18 at Topeka and subsequently charged with "highway robbery." (See, Kansas Historical Collections, 4:561) Although "in prison," Kagi assured his sister that he was safe and could be rescued at anytime; "I hesitate only because we may get out some other way, and because a forcible rescue would bring on a terrible winter war, which I do not wish to see."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Donalson, Israel B.; Free state militia; Kagi, John Henry; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Nebraska Territory; Newspapers - Free State; Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: December 20, 1856
Just released from "prison" after three months, John H. Kagi wrote to his father (who still resided in their native Ohio but was then in Nebraska City) from Topeka, regarding the poor state of his health and finances, as well as politics and future plans. Kragi wanted his father and/or his father's money in KT as soon as possible.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Democratic Party (U.S.); Free state cause; Free state legislature; Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Ohio; Topeka Tribune


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: January 4, 185[7]
From Topeka, shortly after the end of his imprisonment, John Kagi wrote his sister in Bristol, Ohio, a mostly personal letter to say he was eager to return for a short visit, but, he wrote, "I love Kansas [???] than ever, and feel more like laboring with my whole soul's strength for the triumph of her rights."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas question; Ohio; Topeka Tribune; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "Dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: January 26, 1857
Written on stationery that included a item from the Kansas Tribune, "Appeal of Kansas to the Voters of the Free States," Kagi wrote his father, who was still in Nebraska, regarding his continuing problems with proslavery officials in Lecompton. Kagi was arrested again (quickly made bail) and nearly killed by a mob while there "to report the proceedings" of the territorial legislature, which opened on January 12. (This was the first legislature to meet in Lecompton.)

Keywords: Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lecompton; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Stringfellow, John H.; Territorial government; Topeka Tribune


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "Dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: January 30, 1857
From the Tribune office in Topeka, Kagi wrote his father on January 30 that he planned to leave for Ohio via Nebraska City (the safest route and also where his father resided at that time) soon, perhaps by February 15; but, apparently before he could mail that letter, on February 1 (note on back on first letter) he wrote that he would be delayed--Kagi was "shot" on Saturday, January 31, in an "affray" with Judge Rush Elmore in Tecumseh (see, Kansas Tribune, Topeka, February 2, 1857).

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Elmore, Rush; Kagi, John Henry; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; St. Louis, Missouri; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Topeka Tribune; Violence


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear sisterr"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: February 13, 1857
On February 13, 1857, Kagi informed his sister in Bristol, Ohio, that he wouldn't be able to make the expected spring trip home afterall. He did plan to travel to Nebraska City for a few days, but because he was due to appear in court later in the spring, or lose the $8000 bail that had been posted for him, he didn't have time to journey east. He planned to be back in Topeka for the "Great Mass Convention" of freestate me on March 10. (See, Wilder, Annals of Kansas, 157)

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Courts; Free state cause; Kagi, John Henry; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: March 3, 1857
Once again, from Topeka, Kagi wrote his father that his long planned trip to Nebraska City had to be delayed, this time because of high water on the "Kaw river" that "prohibited my crossing" and the state convention, which started in one week. On the positive side, he was still bothered by "the jarring of my head" (the blow inflicted by Elmore with his cane), his wound (gun shot) had nearly healed.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Free state cause; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Kagi, John Henry; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Violence


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: April 14, 1857
Having finally made and returned from his long-delayed trip to Nebraska City, Kagi wrote his father from Lawrence, where he had gone almost immediately "on business." Although he can't discuss the particulars for fear of "bribed P.M. [post master?] spies," Kagi makes some interesting observations about freestate "prospects" throughout the territory, which "look much more hopeful now than when I left." Kagi mentions some land investment opportunities and the expected arrival of Governor Robert Walker, who would not last long if he tried to enforce the "bogus laws."

Keywords: Atchison County, Kansas Territory; Bogus laws; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Kagi, John Henry; Land speculation; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Postal service; Stringfellow, John H.; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: May 20, 1857
On May 20, 1857, Kagi wrote his sister from Lawrence, explaining that he had been sick with the measles for some time but was now just busy writing for the newspaper and "preparing laws for the Free State Legislature," which was scheduled to convene in June. "We shall try hard to put the State Government into operation."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Free state activities; Free state cause; Free state legislature; Illness; Kagi, John Henry; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness)


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: December 27, 1857
On December 27 (or perhaps 29), Kagi wrote this letter to his sister from Springdale, Iowa, in the midst of "a very long & tedious journey." He informed her that his party would leave on the "cars" for Chicago soon, but cautioned her "not for your life" to tell anyone where he was or what he was about, and told her that he would soon be taking an assumed name. [According to historian Stephen Oates, To Purge This Land With Blood, John Brown returned to Kansas in November 1857 and enlisted Kagi and a few others in a new company, which set out in early December for Ohio and some additional training in preparation for Brown's planned assault on the Slave Power in Virginia; on the way, around numerous campfires, Brown apparently encouraged and instructed his young recruits on the just nature of their cause, etc. As it turned out, the company wintered at Springdale while Brown went alone to Ohio.]

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Iowa; Kagi, John Henry


Letter, Wm. Hutchinson to [John Brown?]
Authors: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904
Date: ca. 1857
On the bottom of an incomplete listing of weapons distributed (e.g., Navy Revolvers), William Hutchinson wrote regarding his "earnes effort for you [John Brown?] in this place.

Keywords: Bassett, O. A. (Owen Abbot); Border disputes and warfare; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Guns; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Kagi, John Henry; Weapons (see also Guns); Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Maurice Maitland [J. H. Kagi] to "My Dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: March 5, 1858
On his 23rd birthday, March 5, 1858, Kagi (now alias "Maurice Maitland") wrote a very circumspect letter from Springdale, Iowa, expressing his satisfaction with "the present plitical prospects"--"Every thing is working just to suit me--nothing could suit me better"--and his interest in knowing "what you have learned about J. H." (presumably, himself, J.H. Kagi).

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Springdale, Iowa


Letter, J. [John] Kagi to Friend Adda
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: May 15, 1858
John H. Kagi, one of John Brown's most trusted lieutenants, wrote from St. Catherine, Canada, to inform his friend, albeit in "figurative" language, about the change in their plans--"all depends upon caution."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Ashtabula County, Ohio; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Canada; Kagi, John Henry


Letter, Richard Realf to Dear Uncle [John Brown?]
Authors: Realf, Richard , 1834-1878
Date: May 31, 1858
The Englishman, Richard Realf, another of Brown's trusted followers, wrote to his "uncle" (John Brown?) from Cleveland, Ohio, regarding the threat of arrest that faced him and some of his associates (George Gill, John Kagi, et al), as well as the expenses they were incuring. He also was troubled by the news that certain people knew of certain of their activities, including "a certain Mr. Reynolds (colored) who attended our convention" and "has disclosed its objects to the members of a secret society (colored) called "The American Mysteries" or some other confounded humbug."

Keywords: Bleeding Kansas; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Free state cause; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas Territory; Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Shakers


Articles of Agreement for Shubel Morgan's Company
Authors: Morgan, Shubel
Date: July 12, 1858
In July 1858, fifteen men including Shubel Morgan, alias John Brown, J. H. Kagi, James Montgomery, and Augustus Wattles signed this document and thus "agree[d] to be governed by the following rules" of conduct. The rules included "gentlemanly and respectful deportment," obedience to the commander's orders, "no intoxicating drinks," etc.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Free state militia; Kagi, John Henry; Military; Militia; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Morgan, Shubel; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister, father and others"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: August 13, 1858
By June 28, 1858, J. H. Kagi was back in K.T. at Lawrence, and on August 13 he was writing the family from Moneka, Linn County, where he had "been very busily engaged in fortifying along the State line to prevent further inroads from Missouri." [See J.B. letter of August 3 to Wm. Hutchinson in which he speaks of building the fort on the site of the Marie des Cygnes Massacre.] In an unusually open and frank few lines, Kagi wrote: "C. W. Moffet and two of the other boys (whom you have not seen) are in Ashtabula Co., Ohio. Some have gone to Harpers Ferry. We are all ready and in good spirits. Things are working rightly, here, and brightening elsewhere for our final work. Those who once thought us the most foolish, now think most cheerfully of the whole plan." He closed by asking that they write him at the "Whitney House" in Lawrence.

Keywords: Ashtabula County, Ohio; Border disputes and warfare; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Missouri; Moffett, Charles; Moneka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister, and Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 23, 1858
From Lawrence, Kagi wrote that he had spent several weeks at Osawatomie caring for "Old B." [John Brown], who had "now quite recovered." Things were hard right then, but Kagi was confident that "better times [were] dawning" and that his reward would certainly come "in the end," since "the success of [their] great cause" was "drawing very near." "Few of my age have toiled harder or suffered more in this cause than I, and yet I regret nothing that I have done; nor am I in any discouraged at the future."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Health; Kagi, John Henry; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, [John Henry] Kagi to Friend [William A.] Phillips
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: February 7, 1859
One the back of this "original" letter, "W. A. P." (William A. Phillips) noted that it was written by John H. Kagi, a Brown lieutenant, "after taking the Negroes captured in Missouri near the southeast Kansas line. The last armed exploit of John Brown in Kansas."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Fugitive Slave Law; Jayhawkers; Kagi, John Henry; Missouri; Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893; Tabor, Iowa; United States marshals


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: June 8, 1859
From Cleveland, Ohio, Kagi jokingly wrote his sister that in the absence of any letters from the family, he had feared they had set off for "Pikes Peak, and had died of suffering on the route, as others have." Kagi expected to leave in order to take up his "business in earnest" shortly--that is, to implement Brown's plan and move on Harpers Ferry.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Pikes Peak gold rush; Weather


Letter, William F. Creitz to "Col. James Redpath"
Authors: Creitz, William F.
Date: December 17, 1859
William F. Creitz of Holton, who had served under Aaron Stevens as captain of a Kansas militia company, wrote Redpath regarding "the particulars of 'Old John Brown's' final departure from this territory." Brown and company, which included "eleven fugitives," reached Holton on January 27, 1859, and Creitz described the events that followed, to which he was an "eyewitness" and participant, including the Battle of the Spurs. Creitz's "article" was prepared "to assist you [Redpath] in your praiseworthy undertaking that of publishing the lives of those heroic men." Redpath published "Echoes of Harper's Ferry" in 1860, and Richard J. Hinton used this material in his "John Brown and His Men (1894).

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Battles; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state militia; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Holton, Kansas Territory; Jackson County, Kansas Territory (see also Calhoun County, Kansas Territory); Kagi, John Henry; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Militia; Nebraska Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sharps rifles; Slave power; Spurs, Battle of the; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Topeka, Kansas Territory; Underground railroad; United States marshals


Letter, L. F. Parsons to "Dear Friends Redpath & Hinton"
Authors: Parsons, Luke F.
Date: December 1859
Parsons, "a soldier under John Brown" in Kansas, who fought in the battles of Black Jack and Osawatomie (see, Twenty-fifth Biennial Report, KSHS, 135-136), wrote this letter from Osawatomie to James Redpath and Richard J. Hinton in response to their "notice in the Republican in regard to publishing the life of John Brown & associates at Harpers Ferry & your request for information." In addition to his Kansas activities, Parsons was with Brown and company in Iowa during the winter of 1857-58 and mentions, as did Kagi and others, the "Lyceums" conducted by Brown around their evening campfires and the "thorough course of military instruction under Col. Whipple as Drillmaster." Parsons, who was obviously proud of his association with Brown, apparently just missed being in on the Harpers Ferry raid--he had returned to KT during the long wait and was not recalled.

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Owen; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Coppoc, Barclay; Coppoc, Edwin; Forbes, Hugh; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas City Metropolitan; Kansas City, Missouri; Leeman, William H.; Moffett, Charles; Osawatomie, Battle of; Parsons, Luke F.; Pate, Henry Clay; Quakers (see Society of Friends); Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Rice, Benjamin; Springdale, Iowa; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tabor, Iowa; Tidd, C. P.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Paul Shepherd to James Redpath
Authors: Shepherd, Paul
Date: January 3, 1860
From Dover, Michigan, Paul Shepherd--formerly of Kansas Territory--wrote Redpath to pass along "some useful information, in repect to John H. Kagi." Of most interest, perhaps is Shepherd's account of the "shoot out" at Tecumseh between Kagi and Judge Rush Elmore, who Kagi had accused of "being a prime mover in the murderous attack upon him" at Lecompton in mid-January 1857.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Border ruffians; Cato, Sterling G.; Courts; Elmore, Rush; Free state cause; Free state militia; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Kagi, John Henry; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Moffett, Charles; National Era; Newspapers - Free State; Proslavery perspective; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Topeka Legislature (see Free state legislature); Topeka boys; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Violence


Essay, Sketch of J. H. Kagi by E. R. Moffet
Authors: Moffet, E. R.
Date: March 4, 1860
Apparently written for Redpath and Hinton on March 4, 1860, this handwritten sketch of John H. Kagi is the reflection of long-time acquaintance E. R. Moffet, then of Davenport, Iowa. Moffet knew Kagi from the time the latter was two years old and became reacquainted with him in Kansas Territory. They spent time in "prison" together in October 1856, and in this somewhat odd manuscript, Moffet recreates some "Prison Scenesor Dialogue" and subsequently includes some correspondence from Kagi. Moffet recounts Kagi's second arrest, bail, and March 1857 altercation with Rush Elmore at Tecumseh.

Keywords: Bogus legislature; Elmore, Rush; Free state cause; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas Territory. Legislature - Lecompton; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; National Era; Newspapers - Free State; Proslavery activities; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Topeka Tribune; Violence


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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