Skip Redundent Navigation
Territorial Kansas Online 1854-1861 Explore Topics Territorial A-Z Map Lesson Plans  

Territorial A-Z

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 0-9


29 results for Iowa:
Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: September 4, 1855
In Scott Co., Iowa ("about 4 miles West of the Mississippi"), on his way to Kansas Territory, John Brown wrote the family to say all was well despite some delays caused by their freight in Chicago and a sick horse. Brown commented mostly on the nature of there journey to date and some miscellaneous business matters.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Brown, Oliver; Brown, Watson, 1835-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Iowa; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri; Travel


Pamphlet, Miscellaneous State Legislative Resolutions
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1855-1856
Includes Resolutions from various State Legislatures concerning the extension of slavery into Kansas Territory, disturbances in Kansas Territory, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the admission of Kansas into the Union as a state.

Keywords: Iowa; Kansas Nebraska Act; Legal documents; Maine; Massachusetts; National politics; New Hampshire; Ohio; Rhode Island; Slavery; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); Texas; Violence


Letter, F. D. Kimball to Eli Thayer, Esq.
Authors: Kimball, F. D.
Date: May 30, 1856
F. D. Kimball, Attorney General of Ohio, wrote from Columbus, Ohio to Eli Thayer. Kimball reported on James Lane's recent visit to Ohio and described Lane's plans to establish a "line of communication with Kansas via Iowa & Nebraska" for the passage of emigrants and supplies. This line of communication, which allowed free state supporters to bypass Missouri in travelling to Kansas, became known as the Lane Trail.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state support; Iowa; Kimball, F. D.; Lane Trail; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Nebraska Territory; Ohio; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899


To the friends of free Kansas
Authors: Kansas Central Committee of Iowa
Date: July 4, 1856
The Kansas Central Committee of Iowa suggested a different overland route to Kansas, recommending that emigrants travel through Iowa instead of Missouri. Also the committee wanted men from the west to come to Kansas instead of eastern men, since travel from back East would be too expensive.

Keywords: Antislavery; Clark, W. Penn; Downey, H. D.; Emigration and immigration; Hobart, C. W.; Immigration and early settlement; Iowa; Iowa City, Iowa; Kansas Central Committee of Iowa; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Settlement; Topeka, Kansas


Circular, To the Friends of Free Kansas
Authors: Kansas Central Committee of Iowa
Date: July 4, 1856
This printed circular, written at Iowa City, Iowa, described an alternative migration route to Kansas that traveled through Iowa. This route would allow antislavery emigrants to avoid traveling through Missouri. The circular also appealed to emigrant aid committees in the East to provide funds to send Iowans to Kansas.

Keywords: Circulars; Clark, W. Penn; Downey, H. D.; Emigration and immigration; Hobart, C. W.; Iowa; Iowa City, Iowa; Kansas Central Committee of Iowa; Transportation; Travel


Letter, Peter Page to Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Page, Peter
Date: July 6, 1856
Peter Page wrote from Chicago, Illinois to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, concerning the shipment of relief to free-state settlers in Kansas Territory and the emigration of settlers into Kansas. The author wrote a lengthy account of the committee's frustrated attempts to arrange suitable transportation into the territory, since the water route on the Missouri River was unsafe due to persistent harassment from border ruffians.

Keywords: Border ruffians; Chicago, Illinois; Emigration and immigration; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Iowa; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lexington, Missouri; Missouri; Page, Peter; Violence


Letter, William H. Leeman to "Dear Mother"
Authors: Leeman, William H.
Date: July 15, 1856
William H. Leeman, a follower of John Brown in Kansas and eventually a casualty of the Harpers Ferry raid, wrote this letter to his mother while "traveling across the prairies of Iowa" in July 1856. Although he briefly mentions an encounter with "2,000 border ruffians," he assures his mother that he is safe, in good health, and well armed, and that he is much happier in this "adventure" than had he staid home and "worked in a shop."

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cannons; Free state militia; Iowa; Leeman, William H.; Militia; Missouri; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, J. F. Tallant to Hon. E. Thayer
Authors: Tallant, J. F.
Date: July 15, 1856
J. F. Tallant wrote from Burlington, Iowa to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts, seeking Thayer's endorsement of a plan to build a railroad across southern Iowa from Burlington, on the Mississippi River, to a point on the Missouri River. He observed that the federal government recently passed an Iowa land bill donating alternate sections of land to four railroad routes from the Mississippi River to the Missouri River. Tallant maintained that the proposed southern Iowa route would provide an easier route to Kansas for antislavery supporters.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Iowa; Railroads; Tallant, J. F.; Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899; Transportation


Letter, Martin [Stowell] to My Dear E and others
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: August 15, 1856
This letter was written by Martin Stowell from Lexington, Kansas Territory. He described his journey to Kansas and the movements of his emigrant train, of which he was elected military head. He also spoke of the local vegetation and his belief that he could make a fine home in this country. Stowell also gave his friend advice about the best route into Kansas and recommended that all mail be sent through Nebraska City, NE or Burlington, IA so correspondence would not pass through a slave state. Stowell also asked the recipient of the letter to forward this letter to T. W. Higginson.

Keywords: Brown County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Iowa; Land claims; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Postal service; Stowell, Martin; Travel


Report, Vermont Colony in Kansas
Authors: Newton, B. B.
Date: September 24, 1856
This report written by B. B. Newton to the Vermont State Kansas Committee. He described the efforts made by the party to settle in Kansas.

Keywords: Antislavery; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Emigration and immigration; Free state; Iowa; Kansas Frontier; Massachusetts; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Newton, B. B.; Relief; Vermont


Letter, Watson Brown to Dear Mother, [Mary Brown] Brother and Sister
Authors: Brown, Watson , 1835-1859
Date: October 30, 1856
En route to K.T. via St. Charles, Iowa, Watson Brown wrote the family that he was in "fine spirits besides being in good company we are in the company of a train of Kansas teams loaded with Sharps rifles and canon.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Watson, 1835-1859; Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895; Iowa; Lane Trail; Sharps rifles; Smith, Gerritt


Testimonies of Nathaniel Parker, Horace L. Dunnell, Hinton S. Dunnell, Alexander MacArthur, James Hall, Jerome Hazen, and Charles Henry Caulkins
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: December 5, 1856 - December 7, 1856
These testimonies, presumably taken down on paper by Thaddeus Hyatt of the National Kansas Committee, include personal information about each settler, such as their age, occupation, etc., as well as their experiences in Kansas and their involvement in border warfare and skirmishes with pro-slavery settlers. Each account is descriptive and provides tremendous detail about their individual experiences. The testimonies of MacArthur, Hall, and Hazen are combined into one, with this group testimony split into two separate sections.

Keywords: Battles; Black Jack, Battle of; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Caulkins, Charles Henry; Cutter, Calvin M.; Dunnell, Hinton S.; Dunnell, Horace L.; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Guns; Hall, James; Harvey, James A.; Hazen, Jerome; Hickory Point, Battle of; Hoyt, David Starr; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Iowa; Iowa City, Iowa; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; MacArthur, Alexander; Missouri River; Parker, Nathaniel; Prisoners; Prisons; Proslavery activities; Skirmishing; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas; Weapons (see also Guns); Weston, Missouri; Wounds and injuries


Map, Kansas and Nebraska
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This 1856 map included not only Kansas, Nebraska, and Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma), but also Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Wisconsin, and Illinois, and marked the counties in those states and territories as they existed at that time.

Keywords: Arkansas; Illinois; Indian lands; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Maps; Minnesota; Missouri; Nebraska Territory; Wisconsin


Broadside, Chicago and Burlington Railroad "Iowa and Kanzas Spring Arrangement", 1856
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This 1856 advertisement for the Chicago and Burlington Railroad presented its new seasonal schedule, or "Spring Arrangement", which included maps and information about the company's routes from Chicago to Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri, and connection with stagecoach lines in Kansas.

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Illinois; Iowa; Maps; Missouri; Railroad companies; Railroads; Stagecoaches; Transportation; Travel


Settlers on Little Sugar Creek
Authors: Stewart, John E.
Date: c. 1856 or 1857
This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border ruffians; Churches; Free state settlers; Illinois; Indiana; Iowa; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Sugar Creek, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Missouri; Ohio; Proslavery settlers; Schools; Settlement; Timber; Titus, Henry Theodore; Violence; Westport, Missouri


Letter, W. F. N. Arny to Capt. [John] Brown
Authors: Arny, W F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881
Date: March 11, 1857
From Louisville, Kentucky, W. F. N. Arny wrote to inform Brown of the contents of the 14 boxes of clothing Arny had prepared for shipment to "J.B." in care of "Jonas Jones Tabor Iowa." The shipment, which included coats, pants, quilts, etc., is itemized on three additional sheets of paper.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Clothing and dress; Emigrant aid companies; Free state support; Iowa; Kentucky


Letter Press Book, Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Dear Judge [M. F. Moore]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: June 5, 1857
Thomas Ewing, Jr., moved to Kansas Territory in 1856 and established a law practice in Leavenworth. It is from this town, Kansas Territory's largest city, where he also had many investments, that he wrote Judge M. F. Moore, Sioux City, Iowa, regarding Moore's investments and other opportunities in Leavenworth.

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Iowa; Land acquisition; Land speculation; Lawyers; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Town development; Town promotion


Letter, John Brown to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: July 17, 1857
In a very brief letter to his "wife & children," John Brown wrote from Iowa, en route to Kansas, that travel was slow because of the freight they were hauling and that little news of interest was coming from Kansas." He closed: "I would give anything to know that I should be permitted to see you all again in this life. But Gods will be done. To his infinite grace I commend you all."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Religion; Transportation; Travel


Letter, N. Hawkins [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children every one
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859; Hawkins, N.
Date: August 17, 1857
Using the alias Nelson Hawkins, John Brown wrote his family from Tabor, Iowa, on August 17, 1857, regarding some family matters and their slow trip to Kansas. He seems to suggest that if things continue quiet in K.T. he might soon direct his attention to the East.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Free state cause; Hawkins, N.; Iowa; Tabor, Iowa


Letter, J. [James] H. Lane to Dear Genl. [John Brown]
Authors: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866
Date: September 29, 1857
James H. Lane wrote from Falls City, Nebraska Territory, to John Brown in Tabor, Iowa, urging Brown to get guns and ammunition to Kansas as soon as possible. Lane wanted Brown's help in preventing proslavery supporters from disrupting the October 7, 1857, election for representatives to the territorial legislature.

Keywords: Ammunition; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Elections; Guns; Iowa; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Nebraska Territory; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, E. B. Whitman to My Dear Mr. [G. L.] Stearns
Authors: Whitman, E. B.
Date: October 25, 1857
In this report from Lawrence, Whitman complained about his money problem and wrote that John Brown, who, according to Sanborn, had been in Iowa for some weeks, would be in Lawrence for "a very important council" of the military organization. "Look for something decisive this winter and Satisfactory." He informed Stearns that he (Whitman) would take care of "J. B.'s wants" as soon as he could, but there was a limit to what he could borrow on his own account. "I am willing to work, wear out, die if need be in the cause, but I cannot send a brick always without straw."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Conway, Martin Franklin; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state militia; Iowa; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: December 27, 1857
On December 27 (or perhaps 29), Kagi wrote this letter to his sister from Springdale, Iowa, in the midst of "a very long & tedious journey." He informed her that his party would leave on the "cars" for Chicago soon, but cautioned her "not for your life" to tell anyone where he was or what he was about, and told her that he would soon be taking an assumed name. [According to historian Stephen Oates, To Purge This Land With Blood, John Brown returned to Kansas in November 1857 and enlisted Kagi and a few others in a new company, which set out in early December for Ohio and some additional training in preparation for Brown's planned assault on the Slave Power in Virginia; on the way, around numerous campfires, Brown apparently encouraged and instructed his young recruits on the just nature of their cause, etc. As it turned out, the company wintered at Springdale while Brown went alone to Ohio.]

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Iowa; Kagi, John Henry


Map, "Guide to Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, & Kansas
Authors: Smith, John Calvin
Date: 1857
This 1857 "Guide" maps the township lines of the United States surveys, as well as the location of cities, towns, villages, post hamlets, canals, rail and stage roads of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas. The map also includes a list of 1850 census statistics.

Keywords: Census; Cities and towns; Illinois; Indiana; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Maps; Michigan; Minnesota; Missouri; Nebraska Territory; Ohio; Postal service; Railroads; Smith, John Calvin; Stagecoaches; Wisconsin


Daniel Mulford Valentine Diary
Authors: Valentine, Daniel Mulford, 1830-1907
Date: January 01, 1859-December 31, 1859
Daniel Mulford Valentine, a 28-year-old lawyer and surveyor, moved to Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, from Fontanelle, Iowa, in mid 1859. Although many of Valentine's daily entries simply record the weather and/or the fact that he spent the day "loafing" or "reading," the diary also details the daily routines of a frontier lawyer and includes a few extraordinary observations on the political happenings of the day. Valentine recorded information about Kansas elections and local politics, and he offered assessments of many of the territory's leaders. Of most interest, however, are of his impressions of Abraham Lincoln, the Illinois lawyer and politician, who visited Leavenworth in early December 1859 to deliver the last two speeches of his brief Kansas tour. In later years, Daniel M. Valentine became a well-known Kansas jurist, ultimately serving for twenty-fours years on the Kansas Supreme Court.

Keywords: Diaries; Elections; Iowa; Lawyers; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Political parties; Valentine, Daniel Mulford


Letter, Your Affectionate Husband & Father [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: March 2, 1859
From Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa, Brown wrote this short letter to tell his family that all was "well," despite that persistent "ague," and to discuss some family business matters: buying a team, etc.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Health; Horses; Iowa


Letter, John E. Stewart to My Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Stewart, John E.
Date: December 20, 1859
John E. Stewart wrote from Wakarusa, Kansas to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, describing his work on the underground railroad. This letter detailed the inclement weather and difficulties he encountered as he helped slaves to escape from Missouri, as well as his procedure for locating the slaves and hiding them in his wagon. Stewart sought to gain assistance from Hyatt, mainly in the form of provisions and horses. He also needed advice about what to do with the escaped slaves to ensure that they were not captured and sold again into slavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; African Americans; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Horses; Iowa; Missouri; Nebraska Territory; Relief; Slaves; Stewart, John E.; Underground railroad; Weapons (see also Guns)


Handbook to the Gold Fields of Nebraska and Kansas. Being a Complete Guide to the Gold Regions of the South Platte & Cherry Creek.
Authors: Byers, William N.; Kellom, Jno. H.
Date: 1859
As the title indicated, this booklet was a guide for those want to look for gold in the Cherry Creek area near present Denver, Colorado and in the South Platte area of Nebraska. The author included an account from a miner written in 1858 on the South Platte and provided a detailed listing of the equipment needed and its cost as well as a day by day guide to the route. The booklet contained a great deal of information about and advertisements from Council Bluffs, Iowa, and Omaha City, Nebraska Territory. The author of the handbook felt that the Pike's Peak gold rush was a myth.

Keywords: Advertisements; Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Cherry Creek, Kansas Territory; Colorado; Council Bluffs, Iowa; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Gold mines and mining; Iowa; Nebraska Territory; Omaha City, Nebraska Territory; Pikes Peak gold rush; Travel


Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas.
Authors: Mitchell, S. Augustus
Date: 1860
Includes topographic features. Indicates locations of forts. Removed from Mitchell's New General Atlas with page number 33. Archaic county names and boundaries in Kansas. Link to scanned image at Wichita State University Libraries - Special Collections.

Keywords: Forts; Illinois; Iowa; Maps; Missouri; Nebraska Territory


Letter, James [Mead] to My dear Father
Authors: Mead, James R.
Date: February 14, 1861
James R. Mead wrote this letter from his ranch and trading post near the Saline River to his father in Davenport, Iowa. He vehemently declared that the stories about suffering settlers in Kansas Territory were "bare-faced lies." He wished that those in the East would stop sending relief supplies because "it all goes into the hands of favorites" and Kansas would be better off without it. He also provided his father with advice, telling him to appreciate his home in Iowa and to stay out of the way of any enemies.

Keywords: Famines; Iowa; Mead, James R.; Ottawa County, Kansas Territory; Poverty; Relief


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

The current URL is http://www.territorialkansasonline.org/~imlskto/cgi-bin/index.php?SCREEN=keyword&selected_keyword=Iowa&sort
_by=true&submit=Go&allresults=1.
This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.