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18 results for Indian treaties:
Letter, unsigned [Daniel Vanderslice] to Col. A. Cumming
Authors: Vanderslice, Daniel
Date: July 7, 1855
Daniel Vanderslice, Indian Agent and immigrant to K.T. from Kentucky, wrote from the Great Nemaha Indian Affairs Agency in Nebraska, to Alfred Cumming, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Territory. Vanderslice was concerned about his role as an Indian Agent, stating "if the Government intends to support the Indian Department, it should be clothed with ample power to carry out the stipulations of the treaties". He also mentioned incidents he knew in which white settlers were clearing timber from lands designated to Indian reserves. Vanderslice lamented his powerlessness to fight injustices against the Indian tribes whom he had been designated to serve.

Keywords: Indian agents; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Nebraska Territory; St. Joseph, Missouri; Timber; Vanderslice, Daniel


Letter, [Lucy B. Armstrong] to Dear Sir [Thomas Hendricks]
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: November 10, 1857
Lucy B. Armstrong, in this unsigned letter to Thomas Hendricks, Land Office Commissioner, requested that he take action on her behalf to secure her entitled plot of land, per treaties with the Wyandot tribe made on March 17, 1842 and Jan 31, 1855. Hendricks had previously told her that Wyandot lands were all claimed, and that she should apply for Shawnee lands, though at present her request had not gotten any attention. Her husband, John M. Armstrong, was the brother of Silas Armstrong, and deceased at the time of this letter, leaving her with 5 children. Both Silas and John were leaders of the Wyandot Nation.

Keywords: Armstrong, John M.; Armstrong, Lucy B.; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Shawnee Indians; United States. General Land Office; United States. Surveyor General; Wyandot Indians


Contract, Lucy B. Armstrong et. al. and Munsee Indians
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B. ; Bartley, Mordecai ; McLaughlin, William ; Moonhouse, Jacob ; Williams, Gideon
Date: January 6, 1858
This contract, an agreement made between one party, Lucy Armstrong, William McLaughlin, and Mordecai Bartley, and another, Jacob Moonhouse and Gideon Williams, both Munsee Indians. The body of the document states that the party which includes Lucy Armstrong intends to recover from the United States government sums of money which are owed to the Munsee Indians, as promised to them in treaties of 1805,1839, 1848. In return for obtaining these sums, totaling more than $70,000 for the Munsee Indians, Armstrong and her party would receive 20%.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Bartley, Mordecai; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Legal documents; McLaughlin, William; Moonhouse, Jacob; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; Williams, Gideon; Wisconsin


Written Testimony, Cornelius C. Seth
Authors: Seth, Cornelius C.
Date: January 7, 1858
This testimony of Cornelius Seth, attests to the nature of the Munsee Indians' current status. Seth, Chief of Stockbridges, stated that the Munsee Indians had come from Wisconsin to Kansas Territory in fall of 1839, and verified that they have always maintained a separate organization from all other Indian tribes and do not receive benefits through association with any other Indian nation. He maintained that the Munsees were owed traveling expenses from their 1839 journey from Wisconsin, which was very expensive, and that their numbers were dwindling rapidly "in consequence of want and exposure".

Keywords: Indian lands; Indian treaties; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; Travel; Wisconsin; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, LBA [Lucy B. Armstrong] to Dear Sir [Mordecai Bartley]
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: January 11, 1858
Lucy Armstrong wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, to her attorney, Mordecai Bartley, regarding her lawsuit against the U.S. government on behalf of the Munsee Indians. Lucy described a situation in which the survival of the Munsee tribe was threatened by disease and invasion by Missourians. She enclosed with this letter copies of Cornelius Seth's testimony and other documents related to the lawsuit. Armstrong also described 5 agreements made since 1805 by which the Munsee Indians should have received benefits.

Keywords: Armstrong, John M.; Bartley, Mordecai; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Legal documents; McLaughlin, William; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.


Letter, Lucy B. Armstrong to Wm Brindell
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: March 8, 1858
Lucy Armstrong wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, to Gen. William Brindle at the Land Office in Lecompton, regarding her request for land entitled to her as the widow of John M. Armstrong. Armstrong listed the number of documents she had sent to the Land Office in order to prove herself an heir of John M. of the Wyandot nation, which would show her entitlement to a "float". She had not seen any action on the matter, and wanted to secure a land claim in the Shawnee lands before they were all spoken by white settlers. Armstrong expressed great distress over this matter, having fought to claim her land entitlement for over a year.

Keywords: Armstrong, John M.; Armstrong, Lucy B.; Brindle, William; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Shawnee Indian Reserve; United States. General Land Office; Wyandot Indians


Legal document, Request for Law Directive from Margarite Skicket
Authors: Bartley, Mordecai ; McLaughlin, William ; Skicket, Margarite
Date: March 26, 1858
This document, directed to the Senate and House of Representatives of the U.S. Congress, described the experience of Margarite Skecket, herself part Osage Indian, who was granted land under a treaty of June 1825. Because she had married, she left that land for that of her husband, a Delaware Indian. Upon his death, she returned to her own land but found that her half-sister had sold it back to the government, having given none of the monetary returns to the land's rightful owner, Skecket herself. This document requested that a law directive be created, which would require Skecket's half-sister to turn over the $1280 to her.

Keywords: Bartley, Mordecai; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Legal documents; McLaughlin, William; Osage Indians; Skicket, Margarite


Letter, Lucy B. Armstrong to C. E. Mix
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: July 23, 1858
Lucy Armstrong, widow of John M. Armstrong, a Wyandot Nation leader, wrote to Charles E. Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Armstrong wrote that Commissioner Lawrence, in the service of Indian Affairs, had threatened that, because she was such a bother in the matter of obtaining her land entitlement, he would revenge himself to her. She countered to Mix that she had not been a bother, but was upset because the land finally granted her was in three separate pieces, one below the high water mark, and alluded to Mix that she thought Commissioner Lawrence was assigning these poor claims to the Indians in order to leave the better ones for themselves.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Mix, Charles E.; Munsee Indians; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Samuel C. [Smith] to "Dear Dr." [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 7, 1858
In this letter, also from Lawrence, Smith went into some detail about developments with respect to the Delaware lands, apparently connected to a railroad promotion scheme. The Indians "know that [Robert S.] Stevens is connected with the R. R. enterprise and this action of his . . . Has excited their mistrust and caused obstacles to rise in the way of such a treaty as you [Robinson] desire."

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Delaware Indians; English Bill; Indian treaties; Miller, Josiah; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Railroad promotion; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, S.C.S [Samuel C. Smith] to Dear Doctor [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 19, 1858
The focus of this letter from Lawrence to Robinson in Washington, D.C., was the effort underway in Lawrence and Douglas County to attract a railroad and to have it built south of the Kansas River. Leavenworth, Kansas City, and Lawrence were obviously in the midst of their battle to gain advantage on the transportation front, and the decisions being made in Washington at that time with respect to land grants were vital to their future interests.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Jayhawkers; Johnnycake, Charles; Kansas City, Missouri; Kansas River, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Railroad conventions; Railroad land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stevens, Robert S.


Letter, John G. Pratt to Dr. C. Robinson
Authors: Pratt, J. G. J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900
Date: January 9, 1859
John G. Pratt, a Baptist missionary to the Delaware Indians, wrote to Charles Robinson from Delaware, Kansas Territory, describing the politics of the negotiations taking place with the Delaware Indian land purchase. "Old Sar-koxy," a Delaware leader, had indicated that Robinson was attending to his business, which angered younger Delaware delegates Isaac and Charles Johnnycake. Pratt indicated his confidence that the sale would take place regardless of who led the negotiations for the Delaware.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Indian treaties; Native Americans; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Milton Fithion]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: March 14, 1859
Recently back in Leavenworth after spending the winter in Washington conducting railroad business, Thomas Ewing, Jr., wrote to Milton Fithion [?] of Urbana, Ohio, regarding payment for what was apparently a bogus "Wyandot float." Such a claim, if valid, "would be worth from $1,500 to $2,000," but Marcus Parrott, who had agreed to buy the float had discovered that the named "Wyandot" was not included in the "treaties as entitled to land."

Keywords: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fithion, Milton; Indian treaties; Land claims; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Urbana, Ohio; Wyandot Float


Letter, unsigned [Lucy Armstrong] to Dear Gov. Roberts
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: April 20, 1859
Lucy Armstrong wrote to a Governor Roberts from "Linden", continuing a conversation that she had had with him in person two weeks before. Armstrong told him that the article of agreement brought to her by her brother-in-law, Silas Armstrong, led her to believe that the lands granted to her would not be whole, but separate from one another. She told him that she had not agreed to the separateness of hers, but that she would give a portion of it to the Wyandotte Town Company, of which Silas was President. However, it was later discovered that individual town shares could not be divided.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Armstrong, Silas; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Town companies; Town shares; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, Cornelius Seth, et al. to Commissioner of Indian Affairs
Authors: Denny, Lewis ; Gray, Michael ; Seth, Cornelius C.
Date: July 26, 1859
Cornelius Seth, Lewis Denny, and Michael Gray, all leaders of Indian groups referred to as "New York Indians", wrote to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The three acted as representatives of their tribes in order to obtain the land entitled to them by the a treaty signed January 1, 1838 at Buffalo Creek, New York. They contended that the longer the delay in granting them their land, the more problems both sides would have. The Indian leaders were especially concerned about tribe mates with homes in other states, who had never intended to settle in Kansas Territory and had sold their entitlements back to the government, to the disadvantage of those Indians who had remained in the Territory.

Keywords: Denny, Lewis; Gray, Alfred; Gray, Michael; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Indian treaties; New York Indian Reserve; New York Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, A. [Albert] G. Boone to Col. Thos. N. Stinson
Authors: Boone, Albert G.
Date: January 16, 1860
Albert G. Boone, writing from Westport, Missouri, to Thomas N. Stinson, described his unsuccessful efforts to sell a printing press for Stinson. Boone suggested that Stinson contact "Free Statemen" with whom he was on good terms to see if they could help him sell it. Boone added a postscript to the letter asking about the prospects of a treaty with the Pottawatomie.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Boone, Albert G.; Business; Commerce; Indian treaties; Native Americans; Newspaper presses; Pottawatomi Indians; Stinson, Thomas N.


Letter, R. Brackenridge, Jr. to Tom [Thomas N. Stinson]
Authors: Brackenridge, R.
Date: February 16, 1860
R. Brackenridge, writing from Washington D.C. to Thomas N. Stinson, a resident of Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, commented on the possibility of a treaty with the Pottawatomie Indians who were living in Kansas. Brackenridge expressed negative views about the activities of Anthony Navarre, a Native American who had a following among the Pottawatomie and who opposed a treaty with the U.S. government. The U.S. signed a treaty with the Pottawatomie Indians in November 1861.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Brackenridge, R.; Indian treaties; Native Americans; Navarre, Anthony; Pottawatomi Indians; Stinson, Thomas N.; Treaties


Letter, Alfred Gray, Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Geo. W. Patterson
Authors: Gray, Alfred
Date: June 18, 1860
Gray wrote this draft of a letter to George W. Patterson concerning a treaty between the U. S. government and the Delaware Indians at the request of Rev. Pratt, a missionary to the tribe. Gray was concerned that the treaty was unfair to many of the Delaware and that the U.S. government was negotiating with four older chiefs, not some of the younger members of the tribe. He wrote that many of the Delaware were too intimidated to complain.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Delaware Indians; Gray, Alfred; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Native Americans; Patterson, George W.; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Statement of William Walker, member of Wyandot Nation
Authors: Walker, William
Date: January 16, 1861
William Walker, a member of the Wyandot Nation, described the political history of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Kansas Territory. Walker stated that a missionary had accompanied the tribe on their migration from Ohio to Kansas Territory, but that in a political dispute within the church organization, in which the ME Church split into North and South organizations, that missionary had returned to Ohio in loyalty to the North faction. The South organization had prevailed in K.T., though those supporters of the North built a separate church. Mysteriously, the ME Church buildings of both North and South organizations had been burnt down.

Keywords: Churches; Gurley, Rev. James; Indian agents; Indian treaties; Methodist Church; Ohio; Walker, William; Wheeler, Rev. James; Wyandot Indians


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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