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41 results for Indian lands:
Memorandum, Instructions as to Wyandot Float
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: [1857]
This document, obviously written by A. H. Reeder either to the surveyor or to Halderman, is undated but was most likely composed in 1857. It addressed issues related to the location of Reeder's claim to land in the Wandotte float.

Keywords: Halderman, John Adams; Indian lands; Lykins, Johnston; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Searl, Albert D.; Surveyor General (see United States. Surveyor General); Wyandot Float


Letter, S. C. Pomeroy to Mr. [Amos Adams] Lawrence
Authors: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 22, 1854
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Samuel Pomeroy wrote from a settlement, which would come to be called Lawrence, in Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Lawrence was an investor who sponsored the emigrant group who would settle the town of Lawrence. Pomeroy reported that Charles Robinson had been elected President of the Lawrence Association, the first governing body of the town. He was enthusiastic about the abundance of timber resources in the area, which, once secured from the Indians, would make for a good business enterprise. Emigrants were arriving in droves, filling the hotels and increasing demand for land claims. Though he remained positive, Pomeroy warned "Don't make yourselves believe that the slave holders have given up Kansas!" and anticipated a political battle during the upcoming Territorial Legislature election.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Branscomb, Charles H.; Business enterprises; Elections; Emigration and immigration; Hotels; Illness; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery supporters; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Timber; Town development


Letter, unsigned [Daniel Vanderslice] to Col. A. Cumming
Authors: Vanderslice, Daniel
Date: July 7, 1855
Daniel Vanderslice, Indian Agent and immigrant to K.T. from Kentucky, wrote from the Great Nemaha Indian Affairs Agency in Nebraska, to Alfred Cumming, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Territory. Vanderslice was concerned about his role as an Indian Agent, stating "if the Government intends to support the Indian Department, it should be clothed with ample power to carry out the stipulations of the treaties". He also mentioned incidents he knew in which white settlers were clearing timber from lands designated to Indian reserves. Vanderslice lamented his powerlessness to fight injustices against the Indian tribes whom he had been designated to serve.

Keywords: Indian agents; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Nebraska Territory; St. Joseph, Missouri; Timber; Vanderslice, Daniel


Nebraska and Kanzas
Authors: J. H. Colton & Co.
Date: 1855
The map, published in 1855, showed the eastern portions of both Kansas and Nebraska. The Nebraska portion depicts the counties that had been established at that time. The Kansas portion included cities, various Indian reservations, and rivers.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Indian lands; Maps; Native Americans; Nebraska Territory


Letter, O. [Orville] C. Brown to Dear Sir [Edward Allen]
Authors: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: March 18, 1856
Orville C. Brown wrote from his home in Osawatomie to Edward Allen, describing the location of Osawatomie and the natural resources in the area. He also informed the recipient of the letter about the essential provisions to bring when emigrating to Kansas, as well as the current situation of free staters in Kansas.

Keywords: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Free state cause; Indian lands; Mills and mill-work; Native Americans; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory


Letter, Hiram Hill to E. B. Whitman
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: March 28, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to E.B. Whitman, presumably in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hill asked him for the news of Lawrence, including the progress of several buildings' construction and the development of Whitman's map. Hill also inquired about Wyandotte and Shawnee Indian lands in the area, and expressed his interest in investing in them, as long as the land was good.

Keywords: Free State Hotel; Hill, Hiram; Indian lands; Lawrence buildings; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Maps; Shawnee Indians; Wyandot Indians


Letter, S. N. Simpson to Hiram Hill
Authors: Simpson, Samuel Newell
Date: September 30, 1856
Samuel Simpson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill, expressing his support for the election of John Fremont to the Presidency. Simpson also discussed the prospective purchase of Wyandot Indian lands, and told Hill he would invest in them if Hill wished. He added that he had received direction from Thomas Webb, Secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Society, to draw money from him; Simpson assumed this was the money sent by Hill.

Keywords: Hill, Hiram; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Money; Real estate investment; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Wyandot Indians


Letter, S. N. Simpson to Hiram Hill
Authors: Simpson, Samuel Newell
Date: October 30, 1856
Samuel Simpson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill. Simpson reported that he had purchased Wyandotte lands, along with other investors, in hopes of having a town ready in time to receive a wave of emigrants the following spring. He told Hill that he would send him a map of the site, and reiterated his support for presidential candidate John Fremont. However, Simpson proclaimed that the outcome of the elections didn't matter, that the free state men "are bound to have this matter our own way -- and it if don't come one way it must another".

Keywords: Emigration and immigration; Free state support; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Hill, Hiram; Indian lands; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Town development; Wyandot Indians


Brief for Applicant in the matter of the "Wyandott Robitaille Float."
Authors: Weer, William
Date: Circa 1856
William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Indian floats; Indian lands; Jenkins, Gaius; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Livingston, S. J.; Lykins, William H. R.; Mathews, George G.; Native Americans; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robitaille, Robert; Savage, William; United States. General Land Office; Weer, William; Wyandot Float; Wyandot Indians


Map, Kansas and Nebraska
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
This 1856 map included not only Kansas, Nebraska, and Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma), but also Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Wisconsin, and Illinois, and marked the counties in those states and territories as they existed at that time.

Keywords: Arkansas; Illinois; Indian lands; Iowa; Kansas Territory; Maps; Minnesota; Missouri; Nebraska Territory; Wisconsin


Letter, Silas Armstrong to Dear Sister
Authors: Armstrong, Silas
Date: March 1, 1857
Silas Armstrong wrote again to "Sister", this time from Washington, D.C., regarding her dissatisfaction with the purchase Silas had made for her in town shares. Armstrong reassured her that he had treated the investment as if it were his own. He told her that he had tried again to locate her float in the Shawnee lands, but that her uncertainty in all this business made him afraid to continue, for fear that she become angry with him. Armstrong added that he was helping the Seneca and Wyandot delegation with their business, but feared that they too would not accomplish anything.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Armstrong, Silas; Indian floats; Indian lands; Shawnee Indian Reserve


Map of the Shawnee and Wyandott Lands
Authors: Lawrence, Robert J. ; United States., Surveyor General
Date: March 1857
This map, compiled by Robert J. Lawrence, shows lands of the Shawnee and Wyandot Indians where present day Wyandotte and Johnson Counties are now situated. It includes the towns of Kansas City and Westport, both in Missouri, as well as Quindaro, Wyandotte, and Lawrence, in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Indian lands; Johnson County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Robert J.; Maps; Shawnee Indians; Wyandot Indians; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Certificate, receipt for purchase of Iowa Trust Lands
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: June 8, 1857
When the Territory was opened in 1854, the Iowa Indians inhabited most of northern Doniphan County. Shortly after the passage of the Kansas- Nebraska bill a treaty was made between the U.S. Government and the Indians, by which the Indians sold a most of their lands and accepted the diminished reserve which they still occupy. The land that was then released to the Government was known as the "Iowa Trust lands," and was, with the exception of 480 acres, sold to the highest bidder (adapted from William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas").

Keywords: Doniphan County, Kansas Territory; Indian lands; Iowa Indians; Iowa Point, Kansas Territory; Land acquisition; Settlement


Letter, [Lucy B. Armstrong] to Dear Sir [Thomas Hendricks]
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: November 10, 1857
Lucy B. Armstrong, in this unsigned letter to Thomas Hendricks, Land Office Commissioner, requested that he take action on her behalf to secure her entitled plot of land, per treaties with the Wyandot tribe made on March 17, 1842 and Jan 31, 1855. Hendricks had previously told her that Wyandot lands were all claimed, and that she should apply for Shawnee lands, though at present her request had not gotten any attention. Her husband, John M. Armstrong, was the brother of Silas Armstrong, and deceased at the time of this letter, leaving her with 5 children. Both Silas and John were leaders of the Wyandot Nation.

Keywords: Armstrong, John M.; Armstrong, Lucy B.; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Shawnee Indians; United States. General Land Office; United States. Surveyor General; Wyandot Indians


Map of Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory
Authors: Quin, Richard ; United States., Surveyor General
Date: 1857
This map shows a Leavenworth County composed mainly of Kickapoo and Delaware Indian lands, but does feature Leavenworth City. Leavenworth County was founded in 1855 and was named for Colonel Henry H. Leavenworth of the U.S. Army, as was Fort Leavenworth which was established in 1827.

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Indian lands; Kickapoo Indians; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Quin, Richard; United States. Surveyor General


Map, Territory of Kanzas and Indian Territory
Authors: Rogers, H.D.
Date: 1857
Map shows Kansas and Nebraska Territories, and Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma). Proposed Pacific Railroad routes are marked in purple. Existing counties are indicated.

Keywords: Indian lands; Johnston, A. Keith; Kansas Territory; Maps; Pacific railroads; Rogers, H.D.


Contract, Lucy B. Armstrong et. al. and Munsee Indians
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B. ; Bartley, Mordecai ; McLaughlin, William ; Moonhouse, Jacob ; Williams, Gideon
Date: January 6, 1858
This contract, an agreement made between one party, Lucy Armstrong, William McLaughlin, and Mordecai Bartley, and another, Jacob Moonhouse and Gideon Williams, both Munsee Indians. The body of the document states that the party which includes Lucy Armstrong intends to recover from the United States government sums of money which are owed to the Munsee Indians, as promised to them in treaties of 1805,1839, 1848. In return for obtaining these sums, totaling more than $70,000 for the Munsee Indians, Armstrong and her party would receive 20%.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Bartley, Mordecai; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Legal documents; McLaughlin, William; Moonhouse, Jacob; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; Williams, Gideon; Wisconsin


Written Testimony, Cornelius C. Seth
Authors: Seth, Cornelius C.
Date: January 7, 1858
This testimony of Cornelius Seth, attests to the nature of the Munsee Indians' current status. Seth, Chief of Stockbridges, stated that the Munsee Indians had come from Wisconsin to Kansas Territory in fall of 1839, and verified that they have always maintained a separate organization from all other Indian tribes and do not receive benefits through association with any other Indian nation. He maintained that the Munsees were owed traveling expenses from their 1839 journey from Wisconsin, which was very expensive, and that their numbers were dwindling rapidly "in consequence of want and exposure".

Keywords: Indian lands; Indian treaties; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; Travel; Wisconsin; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, LBA [Lucy B. Armstrong] to Dear Sir [Mordecai Bartley]
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: January 11, 1858
Lucy Armstrong wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, to her attorney, Mordecai Bartley, regarding her lawsuit against the U.S. government on behalf of the Munsee Indians. Lucy described a situation in which the survival of the Munsee tribe was threatened by disease and invasion by Missourians. She enclosed with this letter copies of Cornelius Seth's testimony and other documents related to the lawsuit. Armstrong also described 5 agreements made since 1805 by which the Munsee Indians should have received benefits.

Keywords: Armstrong, John M.; Bartley, Mordecai; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Legal documents; McLaughlin, William; Munsee Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.


Letter, Andrew J. Dorn to Sir [Charles E. Mix]
Authors: Dorn, Andrew J.
Date: January 14, 1858
Andrew J. Dorn, U.S. Neosho Agent, wrote from Kansas Territory to Charles E. Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C. The letter concerned a land purchase agreement he had heard about between an unnamed railroad company and the Osage Indians. Dorn felt that the Indians had been swindled, and he was reporting the incident to the government. He was concerned that this incident might set a precedent for companies buying large plots of Indian land, which would lead to skyrocketing prices and a scarcity of land.

Keywords: Chapman, J.B.; Dorn, Andrew J.; Ham, M.M.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Mix, Charles E.; Neosho, Kansas Territory; Osage Indians; Railroad companies; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Charles E. Mix to Sir [J. Thompson]
Authors: Mix, Charles E.
Date: January 29, 1858
Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner of U. S. Indian Affairs, wrote to J. Thompson, Secretary of the U. S. Department of the Interior, regarding an incident described to him by Andrew Dorn, Indian Agent in Neosho, Kansas Territory. In this incident, J. B. Thompson, president of an unnamed railroad company bought a tract of land from the Osage Indian tribe without the consent of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Mix asked Secretary Thompson if it would be appropriate to punish Chapman under the Intercourse Act of 1834.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Chapman, J.B.; Dorn, Andrew J.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land sales; Land speculation; Mix, Charles E.; Railroad companies; Schroder, J.T.; Thompson, J.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, J. Thompson to Sir [Charles E. Mix]
Authors: Thompson, J.
Date: February 9, 1858
J. Thompson, Secretary of U.S. Department of the Interior, wrote to Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs, instructing him on how to proceed regarding J. B. Chapman's unlawful purchase of Osage Indian lands for railroad use. He told Mix to inform Agent Andrew Dorn in Neosho, Kansas Territory, where the sale took place, so that he could warn the Osages not to engage in any further sales. Thompson also requested that Mix contact Chapman to inform him that legal proceedings against him would be instituted immediately.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Butler, Pierce M.; Chapman, J.B.; Dorn, Andrew J.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land sales; Land speculation; Mix, Charles E.; Railroad companies; Thompson, J.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Husband [Joseph H. Trego] to My Dear wife [Alice Trego]
Authors: Trego, Joseph Harrington
Date: February 28, 1858
Joseph Trego wrote from Mound City, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, at their family's home in Illinois. Trego described his overland travels to an Osage Indian trading post and his encounters with the Osage people. He and his friend, Edwin, traveled through Fort Scott, Bourbon County, on their way back to Sugar Mound; Trego recounted their tour of the town, with large homes, a Plaza at the town's center, and a steam mill much like his own. Trego reported that, if they had stayed longer in Fort Scott, they may not have been allowed out, as free state men were collecting in large numbers to capture proslavery "thieves" and destroy the town in the process.

Keywords: Animals; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state militia; Indian lands; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Little Osage River, Kansas Territory; Mills and mill-work; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Osage Indians; Real estate investment; Steam power; Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory; Trading posts; Travel; Trego, Alice; Trego, Joseph Harrington; United States. Army


Letter, William Hutchinson to Jacob Collamer
Authors: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904
Date: March 5, 1858
Hutchinson sought assistance from Collamer, a U.S. senator from Vermont, on a plan to speculate in land on the Delaware Indian reservation in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Collamer, Jacob; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Indian lands; Indian reserves; Land speculation; Native Americans; Wyandot Indians


Letter, Lucy B. Armstrong to Wm Brindell
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: March 8, 1858
Lucy Armstrong wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, to Gen. William Brindle at the Land Office in Lecompton, regarding her request for land entitled to her as the widow of John M. Armstrong. Armstrong listed the number of documents she had sent to the Land Office in order to prove herself an heir of John M. of the Wyandot nation, which would show her entitlement to a "float". She had not seen any action on the matter, and wanted to secure a land claim in the Shawnee lands before they were all spoken by white settlers. Armstrong expressed great distress over this matter, having fought to claim her land entitlement for over a year.

Keywords: Armstrong, John M.; Armstrong, Lucy B.; Brindle, William; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Shawnee Indian Reserve; United States. General Land Office; Wyandot Indians


Legal document, Request for Law Directive from Margarite Skicket
Authors: Bartley, Mordecai ; McLaughlin, William ; Skicket, Margarite
Date: March 26, 1858
This document, directed to the Senate and House of Representatives of the U.S. Congress, described the experience of Margarite Skecket, herself part Osage Indian, who was granted land under a treaty of June 1825. Because she had married, she left that land for that of her husband, a Delaware Indian. Upon his death, she returned to her own land but found that her half-sister had sold it back to the government, having given none of the monetary returns to the land's rightful owner, Skecket herself. This document requested that a law directive be created, which would require Skecket's half-sister to turn over the $1280 to her.

Keywords: Bartley, Mordecai; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Legal documents; McLaughlin, William; Osage Indians; Skicket, Margarite


Letter, Charles E. Mix to Hon J. Thompson
Authors: Mix, Charles E.
Date: April 4, 1858
Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner of U.S. Indian Affairs, wrote to J. Thompson, Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior, regarding communication he had received from A.B. Greenwood, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Mix's inquiry had to do with the land reserve set apart for the New York Indians by a treaty of January 1858 and the growing need for land to distribute to new settlers in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Greenwood, A. B.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Mix, Charles E.; New York Indian Reserve; Settlement; Thompson, J.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, R. S. Stevens to Hon. J. W. Denver
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 14, 1858
Robert S. Stevens wrote from Washington, D.C. to James W. Denver, governor of Kansas, discussing manners of obtaining and using certain Indian lands. Stevens had been in contact with Charles Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, in order to understand the existing agreements between the government and the various tribes. He pressed Governor Denver to make a treaty with the Delaware and Pottawatomie tribes to get control of their lands before the end of the current legislative session, which would allow him to present and get approval for any necessary bills relating to the lands in a shorter amount of time.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Mix, Charles E.; Native Americans; Pottawatomi Indians; Railroad companies; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Chas. Chadwick to H. Hill Esq.
Authors: Chadwick, Charles
Date: April 26, 1858
Charles Chadwick wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding the land dispute between Hill and Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. Chadwick had been advised by Robert Lawrence (perhaps a local attorney) to correspond with a Nathaniel Pope Causin, Prosecutor of Indian Claims, in Washington. Chadwick, for Lawrence's support and assistance, had advised that Hill would pay him. Chadwick was to pass along Causin's card once he received it from Mr. Lawrence.

Keywords: Causin, Nathanial Pope; Chadwick, Charles; Hill, Hiram; Indian lands; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Robert J.; Lawyers; Real estate investment; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, A.C. Morton to Mr. Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: April 30, 1858
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton reported that the arrival of two new Eastern businessmen had brought business growth to the town, including a sash and blind factory and new three-story brick building. Despite these new constructions, Morton described the atmosphere as "dull". Though it was a bad time to sell land, since money was scarce, with the recent opening of Indian lands to settlement it was an optimum time to buy land at a low price.

Keywords: Business enterprises; Economic conditions; Hill, Hiram; Indian lands; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Town development; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Letter, Nath.. Pope Causin to Hiram Hill
Authors: Causin, Nathanial Pope
Date: May 20, 1858
Nathaniel Pope Causin wrote from Washington to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. Causin had received word from Robert Lawrence and Charles Chadwick of the land claim dispute between Hill and Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. He confirmed that he would represent Hill in his lawsuit to maintain ownership of his claim. Causin awaited Robert Lawrence's arrival in Washington in order to proceed aggressively, but would continue making necessary contacts.

Keywords: Causin, Nathanial Pope; Chadwick, Charles; Hill, Hiram; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Land claim disputes; Lawrence, Robert J.; Lawyers; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, Lucy B. Armstrong to C. E. Mix
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: July 23, 1858
Lucy Armstrong, widow of John M. Armstrong, a Wyandot Nation leader, wrote to Charles E. Mix, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Armstrong wrote that Commissioner Lawrence, in the service of Indian Affairs, had threatened that, because she was such a bother in the matter of obtaining her land entitlement, he would revenge himself to her. She countered to Mix that she had not been a bother, but was upset because the land finally granted her was in three separate pieces, one below the high water mark, and alluded to Mix that she thought Commissioner Lawrence was assigning these poor claims to the Indians in order to leave the better ones for themselves.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Mix, Charles E.; Munsee Indians; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, C. [Robinson] to My Dear S. [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: December 15, 1858
In the mostly personal note from Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson briefly mentioned the business ("Lawrence case") he had before "the Land Commission" and then complains about the infrequency of his correspondence from home.

Keywords: Indian lands; Land grants; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Washington, D.C.


Address to the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Kansas
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: ca. 1859
This request, directed to the Kansas Territorial Legislature, asked that the act which incorporated the city of Wyandotte be amended. The solicitors of this request, widows with children, all of Indian decent, stated that the act had not been approved by the majority, and that it had passed the Legislature without their knowledge. The amendment they proposed would exclude their lands from the city of Wyandotte.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Indian lands; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Town companies; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, unsigned [Lucy Armstrong] to Dear Gov. Roberts
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: April 20, 1859
Lucy Armstrong wrote to a Governor Roberts from "Linden", continuing a conversation that she had had with him in person two weeks before. Armstrong told him that the article of agreement brought to her by her brother-in-law, Silas Armstrong, led her to believe that the lands granted to her would not be whole, but separate from one another. She told him that she had not agreed to the separateness of hers, but that she would give a portion of it to the Wyandotte Town Company, of which Silas was President. However, it was later discovered that individual town shares could not be divided.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Armstrong, Silas; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Town companies; Town shares; Wyandotte, Kansas Territory


Letter, Cornelius Seth, et al. to Commissioner of Indian Affairs
Authors: Denny, Lewis ; Gray, Michael ; Seth, Cornelius C.
Date: July 26, 1859
Cornelius Seth, Lewis Denny, and Michael Gray, all leaders of Indian groups referred to as "New York Indians", wrote to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The three acted as representatives of their tribes in order to obtain the land entitled to them by the a treaty signed January 1, 1838 at Buffalo Creek, New York. They contended that the longer the delay in granting them their land, the more problems both sides would have. The Indian leaders were especially concerned about tribe mates with homes in other states, who had never intended to settle in Kansas Territory and had sold their entitlements back to the government, to the disadvantage of those Indians who had remained in the Territory.

Keywords: Denny, Lewis; Gray, Alfred; Gray, Michael; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Indian lands; Indian treaties; New York Indian Reserve; New York Indians; Seth, Cornelius C.; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Signatures of Indian Widows requesting exclusion from Wyandotte
Authors: Armstrong, Lucy B.
Date: ca. 1859
This document, which carries the signature of Lucy Armstrong and other widowed Indians, supplements their request to the Kansas Territorial Legislature to amend the Act of Incorporation of Wyandotte city. The women wished to have their private lands excluded from the city, maintaining that they were not consulted about being included, their lands were remote, and the city taxes too high for them to pay.

Keywords: Armstrong, Lucy B.; Barnett, James; Barnett, Matthew; Beaver, John; Indian lands; Johnson, Sarah; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Punch, Margaret; Solomon, Mary; Town companies; Walker, Lydia; Williams, Charlotte


Letter, R. S. Stevens to S. N. Wood
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 2, 1860
R. S. Stevens, a Democratic attorney who had a variety of financial interests in Kansas during the 1850s and 1860s, wrote this letter to Wood from Washington, D.C., where he (Stevens) seemed to be lobbying for a number of concessions for himself and Kansas Territory. Specifically, he wrote of mail routes and "grants for R Rr" [railroads], which would not be forthcoming because of the Republicans who "care[d] nothing about us [Kansas] except so far as political capital can be made." Much of the letter is a condemnation of the Republican Party, which he also wrote was holding up Kansas admission so it could be used against the Democrats, and the final page addressed action, or inaction, with regard to Indian treaties and land.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Indian lands; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Railroads; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Stevens, Robert S.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte Constitution


List of names of certain New York Indians entitled to 320 acres within the New York Reservation in Kansas Territory
Authors: Greenwood, A. B.
Date: June 9, 1860
This list documented the distribution of the New York Indian lands in Kansas Territory according to provisions of a treaty dated January 15, 1838. The list was submitted to the Secretary of the Interior on June 9, 1860, and approved on June 16, 1860.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Greenwood, A. B.; Indian lands; Land acquisition; Native Americans; New York Indians


Letter, Alfred Gray, Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Geo. W. Patterson
Authors: Gray, Alfred
Date: June 18, 1860
Gray wrote this draft of a letter to George W. Patterson concerning a treaty between the U. S. government and the Delaware Indians at the request of Rev. Pratt, a missionary to the tribe. Gray was concerned that the treaty was unfair to many of the Delaware and that the U.S. government was negotiating with four older chiefs, not some of the younger members of the tribe. He wrote that many of the Delaware were too intimidated to complain.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Delaware Indians; Gray, Alfred; Indian lands; Indian treaties; Native Americans; Patterson, George W.; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Investment Share Certificate, Iowa Point Hotel Company Share
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: ca. 1855
This certificate documented the investment of William Patten into the Iowa Point Hotel Company of Kansas Territory. It was signed by William Word, President of the Company, and Thomas J. Vanderslice, Secretary. When Kansas Territory was opened, in 1854, the Iowa Indians were the possessors of the greater part of northern Doniphan County. After the passage of the Kansas- Nebraska bill a treaty was made between the Government and the Indians, by which the latter sold a large share of their lands and accepted the diminished reserve which they still occupy. The land thus released to the Government was known as the "Iowa Trust lands," and was, with the exception of 480 acres, sold to the highest bidder. Iowa Point was founded on these lands.

Keywords: Indian lands; Iowa Indians; Iowa Point Hotel Company, Kansas Territory; Town companies; Town shares; Vanderslice, Thomas J.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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