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10 results for Immigrants:
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Public letter with Interrogatories
Authors: Whitman and Searl
Date: May 8, 1856
Edmund A. Whitman and Albert D. Searl established an Emigrants' Intelligence Office in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. They stressed the importance of finding out information about the country before making a decision about acquiring land in a particular area. This printed letter outlines several issues to be considered and also presents a series of twenty-two questions that they recommend be answered when considering where to settle. While a few of the questions relate to the slave versus free state controversy, most are general concerns to be considered in selecting a place to live. Whitman and Searl produced at least one early Kansas map.

Keywords: Business; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Emigrants' Intelligence Office; Emigration and immigration; Immigrants; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Immigration and early settlement; Land acquisition; Land sales; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Searl, Albert D.; Settlement; Whitman and Searl; Whitman, E. B.


Newspaper article, Journal of Commerce
Authors: Journal of Commerce
Date: September 22, 1856
This clipping, enclosed in a letter from A.S. Harris to Thaddeus Hyatt dated September 22, 1856, argued that the emigration sponsored by New England emigrant aid societies was "indiscreet," although not illegal. The article placed the blame for the current troubles on the free-state settlers in Kansas, stating that Missouri settlers were only responding to the provocation of anti-slavery supporters.

Keywords: Bills, legislative; Border ruffians; Congress (See United States. Congress); Democratic Party (U.S.); Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Free state activities; Free state cause; Immigrants; Kansas Nebraska Act; Massachusetts; Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company; Missouri; Missouri compromise; Pierce administration; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Sectionalism (United States); Slavery; Topeka Constitution; United States Government; United States. Congress; United States. Constitution


Letter, J. J. I. [John J. Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: October 5, 1858
In this first, rather lengthy letter from Sumner, K.T., Ingalls recorded his "impressions" of St. Louis, Missouri, and detailed the combination rail and steamboat trip across Missouri to Kansas Territory. St. Louis had "a hasty, unfinished appearance," from Ingalls's perspective, and "So much filth and poverty. . . ." He was delighted to leave that city and soon road the "Pacific Railroad" as far as Herman, Missouri, where he boarded the steamer "Duncan S. Carter," which is described in some detail, along with the trip up river. Ingalls arrived at his Kansas destination on Monday, October 4, 1858.

Keywords: Immigrants; Jefferson City, Missouri; Kansas City, Missouri; Missouri River; Pacific railroads; St. Louis, Missouri; Steamboats; Sumner, Kansas Territory; Transportation


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to My dear Sir [Hon. John J. Crittenden]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: June 5, 1860
In this letter to Kentucky Senator John J. Crittenden, Ewing urged support for the pending Kansas bill, which would have brought Kansas into the Union under the Wyandotte Constitution, by explaining one potentially controversial provision and assuring the senator that the population of the territory was between 80,000 and 100,000. The constitution provision in question conferred "suffrage on aliens who have declared their intention to become citizens of the United States." Ewing did not argue "the wisdom of this provision" but explained that it was a necessary "inducement to Emigrants" being made by all the western states and territories.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Census; Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Immigrants; Kentucky; Suffrage; United States. Congress. Senate; Wyandotte Constitution


Narrative, Autobiography of Robert S. Gilbert
Authors: Gilbert, Robert L.
Date: undated
Robert Gilbert, an Englishman who had immigrated to the United States and settled in Douglas County in 1855, recounted some events of his early life. This autobiography includes notes on his birthplace, education, profession, and journey to America, "the land of the free." After arriving in Douglas County, Gilbert would defend Lawrence with other free state men in the Wakarusa War.

Keywords: Daily life; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Education; Emigration and immigration; England; Gilbert, Robert L.; Immigrants; Kansas Territory; New York; Transportation; Travel


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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.