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36 results for Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911:
Letter, C. Robinson to Dear Sir [T. W. Higginson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: August 27, 1855
This letter, written by free state governor Charles Robinson, was sent to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a prominent Northern abolitionist. Robinson discussed in rather general terms the troubles facing Kansas, stating that he believed this struggle did not only involve Kansas, "but I regard it as one in which the whole nation is involved." Robinson also expressed doubts that the North would support the free state settlers in the territory, writing that they can only "hope" for reinforcements, not take them for granted. He asked Higginson to stir up Northerners against the bogus legislature, and made mention of ex-Governor Reeder and opposition to the bogus legislature. In general, this letter eloquently demonstrates the passion of this free state leader and his dedication to the cause of liberty.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Bogus legislature; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Free state legislature; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shawnee Manual Labor School


Expense Account, Martin Stowell to Worcester Committee
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: June 25, 1856 - November 28, 1856
This expense sheet, along with the attached memorandum, was written by Martin Stowell for the Worcester Committee in Massachusetts. Stowell had been functioning as the head of an emigrant company originating out of Massachusetts. The sheet provided a detailed listing of the cash he received as well as the cash he expended. His purchases included various foodstuffs, carpentry tools, cooking and eating utensils, and medicine. He also used some of his money to pay for repairs on wagons, etc. The attached memorandum was addressed to "Dear H" (Thomas Wentworth Higginson). It provided further explanation of the account sheet and gave news from the Massachusetts party.

Keywords: Clothing and dress; Finance; Financial statements; Food; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Stowell, Martin; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas; Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, Martin [Stowell] to My Dear E and others
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: August 15, 1856
This letter was written by Martin Stowell from Lexington, Kansas Territory. He described his journey to Kansas and the movements of his emigrant train, of which he was elected military head. He also spoke of the local vegetation and his belief that he could make a fine home in this country. Stowell also gave his friend advice about the best route into Kansas and recommended that all mail be sent through Nebraska City, NE or Burlington, IA so correspondence would not pass through a slave state. Stowell also asked the recipient of the letter to forward this letter to T. W. Higginson.

Keywords: Brown County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Iowa; Land claims; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Postal service; Stowell, Martin; Travel


Receipt, John P. Lovell to T. W. Higginson
Authors: Lovell, John P.
Date: August 20, 1856
This receipt was written by John P. Lovell, a manufacturer and dealer of guns and gun materials, for T. W. Higginson, an ardent Northern abolitionist. Higginson was an agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee, procuring rifles, powder, cartridges and other materials. The purchases on this receipt totaled $19.95. On the back of the receipt is a note stating that this purchase of twenty rifles was never actually paid, since it was a replacement for a previous shipment of rifles that were defective.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Guns; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Receipts; Weapons (see also Guns)


Receipt, B. B. Newton to T. W. Higginson
Authors: Newton, B. B.
Date: August 26, 1856
This receipt from B. B. Newton, an agent with the Vermont State Kansas Committee, was made out to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson, who would transport these twenty rifles to the Vermont Colony in Kansas Territory. Higginson was an agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee.

Keywords: Guns; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; Newton, B. B.; Receipts; Weapons (see also Guns)


Pamphlet, "A Ride Through Kanzas"
Authors: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Date: 1856
These "letters", function as diary entries and were published collectively under the above title, written by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, an ardent Northern abolitionist and agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. Higginson describes his travels through Kansas in the aftermath of the Battle of Hickory Point and includes accounts of the experience of free state prisoners held in Lecompton, as well as those of various citizens of the territory, free state and proslavery alike. He concludes his entries with an assessment of the future in Kanzas, stating that "the more thorough an Abolitionist any man is, the more correct are his prophecies as to American affairs".

Keywords: American Anti-Slavery Society; Antislavery perspective; Border ruffians; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Hickory Point, Battle of; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas Territory; Landscape; Law and Order Party; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Prisoners; Travel


Letter, F. B. Sanborn to My Dear Friend [Thomas Higginson]
Authors: Sanborn, Franklin
Date: September 19, 1856
This letter, from Franklin Sanborn to Thomas Higginson, was written from Concord, Massachusetts. For the most part, Sanborn wrote about the prospects of raising money and men to support the Kansas cause. He also mentioned that Mr. Emerson had made a speech in Cambridge, Massachusetts--"it was a good speech but not well delivered." Many of the towns in the area were also making clothing to send to Kansas Territory. George Stearns was also making progress in his attempts to more fully organize a comprehensive state committee in Massachusetts.

Keywords: Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Nebraska Territory; Relief funds; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Receipt and memorandum concerning weapons and ammunition
Authors: Miller, Joseph C.
Date: September 27, 1856
This receipt, which provides a detailed listing of revolvers, knives, cartridges, and other weapons and ammunition, declared that these weapons were "received of Chas. Robinson." The following page is a memorandum by Preston Plumb, who writes that he received the weapons and ammunition listed on the receipt in Iowa City, Iowa "on or about the 4th of September 1856." The weapons were to be delivered to J. M. Winchell in Kansas but were to be used for the "defense of Kanzas." Several hundred weapons were involved.

Keywords: Ammunition; Border disputes and warfare; Guns; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Receipts; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Sharps rifles; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Weapons (see also Guns); Winchell, James M., 1823-1877


Letter, J. A. Davies to Dear Friend [Thomas Wentworth] Higginson
Authors: Davies, J. A.
Date: September 27, 1856
This letter was written by a Kansas settler named J. A. Davies who was originally from Massachusetts. It was addressed to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, an agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee and an ardent Northern abolitionist. The main topic of the letter was the Leavenworth municipal election on September 1, 1856 and the other "outrages" witnessed by Davies. On the date of that election, border ruffians had crossed the border and hampered the legal voters of the territory from casting their votes. The mob violence was so terrible that virtually every free state settler was driven from the town, and Mr. Hops was murdered by Mr. Fugent. Davies and his family fled to St. Louis and then left for Alton, Illinois, but he hopes to return to the territory.

Keywords: Alton, Illinois; Border ruffians; Davies, J. A.; Election fraud; Elections; Free state perspective; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; St. Louis, Missouri; Violence


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: September 29, 1856
Again from Lawrence, Charles Robinson wrote to his wife was traveling east via Chicago. After kidding her about how well-known she was becoming, he commented unfavorably on Governor John W. Geary, who "thinks he is awful smart & is getting rediculous fast." Robinson also mentioned the forthcoming legislative election (October 6, 1856)--"We shall not vote."

Keywords: Elections; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara Tappan Doolittle (see Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911)


Telegraphic Dispatch, Thaddeus Hyatt to T. W. Higginson
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: October 20, 1856
This telegraphic dispatch was sent from New York by Thaddeus Hyatt, to Thomas Higginson in Worcester, Massachusetts via the Union Telegraphic Company. Hyatt was eager to inform Higginson of an important meeting that he should consider attending if at all possible.

Keywords: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hyatt, Thaddeus; New York; Telegraph; Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, Dunn to Mr. T. W. Higginson
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: October 23, 1856
In this letter to Thomas W. Higginson, an agent of the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee, Mr. Dunn wrote from Oskaloosa, Iowa, regarding the current troubles in Kansas Territory. He was attempting to gather together a company as a response to Gov. Gary's [sic] election and the U. S. Army's efforts to arrest many prominent free state men. According to the author, "the U. S. troops by the order of Gary are taking every free State man they can get hold of." He was eager to hear advice from Higginson about the best way to proceed, and he laid out his plan to amass about 60 men to fight against the border ruffians who had invaded the territory. He hoped that Higginson would support him in this matter by obtaining provisions. Dunn maintained that this plan came from his sense of duty; it did not arise from a warlike spirit.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Free state activities; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; United States. Army


Letter, T. W. Higginson to Dear Sir [William Hutchinson]
Authors: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Date: October 27, 1856
This letter and accompanying list of forthcoming relief supplies (shirts, dresses, over coats, etc.) were directed to William Hutchinson, "Treasurer Kanzas Committee," by Thomas Wentworth Higginson of Brattleboro, Vermont. Three boxes of clothing had been sent and Higginson reminded Hutchinson that it was "very important that in this case & in all cases, prompt acknowledgement should be made of the receipt of everything contributed to Kanzas." People needed to know that their contributions were getting through and that they were appreciated.

Keywords: Clothing and dress; Free state settlers; Free state supporters; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; National Kansas Committee; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Relief


Letter, M. Stowell to My Dear Friend [Thomas Wentworth Higginson]
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: October 27, 1856
This letter, written by Martin Stowell from Nebraska City, was addressed to Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Stowell and other members of his company from Massachusetts had been driven out of Kansas. Fortunately, none of them had been placed under arrest. Stowell had just returned from Lexington, Kansas Territory and he had "left Brown there in as comfortable circumstances as I could." The identity of this man is unclear. The "Plymouth men" in Lexington had stolen their flour and tools which they had hidden in a neighbor's haystack. Stowell inquired about the news revolving around the upcoming Presidential election and other news from the East.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Election, Presidential, 1856; Emigration and immigration; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Nebraska Territory; Stowell, Martin


Letter, John B. Dunning to Mr. [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Dunning, John
Date: October 30, 1856
This letter was written by John Dunning, a member of the Massachusetts Company, to Thomas W. Higginson, a prominent Northern abolitionist and agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. Dunning informed Higginson that it was no longer safe for them to remain in Kansas, so they had temporarily relocated to Nebraska City, Nebraska. Furthermore, he adamantly asserted that "we want no further aid from Massachusetts through the hands of Martin Stowell." He asked that, in the future, all aid come through some other source, such as A. A. Jamerson.

Keywords: Dunning, John; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Massachusetts; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Relief; Stowell, Martin


Letter, R. J. Hinton to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Hinton, R. J.
Date: November 6, 1856
This letter from R. J. Hinton was written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory and was addressed to Rev. Higginson, a radical abolitionist and agent of the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. The letter is filled with information about the struggle for Kansas. Hinton mentioned the trials of the free state prisoners at Lecompton and Governor Geary's order to arrest other free state figures. Colonel Titus was also threatening to help the U. S. troops arrest free state men. Apparently a Captain Homes [sic] from New York had become so frustrated that he had collected several followers and was determined to administer his own brand of justice. Hinton did not completely approve of such action, claiming that while it was understandable, it was "not generally beneficial to our cause." Hinton had experienced some personal troubles as well, when some thieves who claimed to be free state men carried off the belongings of his company, settled at Lexington. The letter concluded with updates about the various men in his company.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Dunning, John; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Proslavery activities; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Titus, Henry Theodore; United States. Army; White, Martin


Letter, H. B. Hurd to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Hurd, H. B.
Date: November 14, 1856
H. B. Hurd was secretary of the National Kansas Committee, and he wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson from the committee's office in Chicago. The main focus of the letter revolves around Higginson's plan of operation to garner support from free state governors. Hurd offered advice about which governors to approach first, also stating his opinion on various related matters. Included in the letter was another sheet, outlining Higginson's "Points to be suggested to the Executives of the States." The back of this sheet has some other notes and doodling.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hurd, H. B.; National Kansas Committee; National politics; United States Government


Letter, M. Stowell to Dear [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: November 19, 1856
This letter from Martin Stowell, written from Nebraska City, was sent to Thomas Higginson to keep him apprised of business and financial affairs. He also included information about the other members of his emigrant party, including a Mr. Dunning, who continually asked Stowell for whiskey money. For the most part, the members of his company were employed and hard at work. Stowell also mentioned Eastern supporters such as Mr. Nightingale from Groton and Mr. Newell from Littleton. He wrote briefly concerning Orville Chester Brown, whose house was destroyed during the battle of Osawatomie.

Keywords: Alcoholic beverages; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Businessmen; Dunning, John; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Finance; Firearms; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Immigration and early settlement; Livestock; Settlement; Stowell, Martin


Letter, Samuel C. Smith to Dear Friend [Rev. T. W. Higginson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: November 26, 1856
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory by Samuel Smith, was addressed to Rev. T. W. Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts. The letter began with several small matters regarding aid for Kansas, and then turned quickly to the most recent events in the struggle between proslavery and free state forces. Apparently, thirty two of the free state prisoners held by U. S. troops at Tecumseh had managed to escape, and Smith rather sarcastically commented that the troops had done a favor to "Uncle Sam" by relieving the government of the cost of supporting all those prisoners. The author also spoke of [Thaddeus] Hyatt's presence in the territory, and of George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom. He also informed Higginson that Col. Eldridge and Thomas Eldridge have had complaints filed against them, stating that "nature never designed them for distributions of charity." The letter concludes with information regarding land sales in Leavenworth, and the founding of a new city, Quindaro. In general, Smith's writing style is quite humorous, as well as informative.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Donalson, Israel B.; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Eldridge, Thomas B.; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas Central Committee; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Prisoners; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Relief; Smith, Samuel C.; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Tecumseh, Kansas Territory; Titus, Henry Theodore; Town development; United States. Army; Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, Emily Kimball to Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Kimball, Emily P.
Date: December 18 - December 19, 1856
This letter was written to Thomas W. Higginson by Emily Kimball, a representative of the ladies of Oakham, Massachusetts. The letter included three dollars for freight on a shipment of supplies to Kansas. On the back of the letter was a note from N. Ayres, asking Higginson to inform the ladies of Oakham about why their contribution was not acknowledged in the circular.

Keywords: Freight and freightage; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Massachusetts; Relief


Letter, S. G. Howe to My Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Howe, Samuel G.
Date: December 18, 1856
Samuel G. Howe, a member of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, a supporter of John Brown and agent for the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. The letter concerned a woman whom Higginson had called a "gentlemen" unknowingly. She had supplied the money for some pistols and had also contributed a great deal of money to the Kansas cause.

Keywords: Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Firearms; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee


Letter, James Redpath to Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Redpath, James , 1833-1891
Date: February 5, 1857
James Redpath, a journalist who had spent some time in Kansas, wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, an abolitionist and agent of the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. Redpath began the letter with a vehement denouncement of Mr. Cutter, after Mr. Cutter allowed the Missourians to arrest him peacefully. Redpath was appalled that Cutter did not even fire a shot. He was obviously distraught, and he sought advice from Higginson on how he should proceed.

Keywords: Cabot, Samuel; Cutter, Calvin M.; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Immigration and early settlement; Redpath, James, 1833-1891


Letter, F. B. Sanborn to Dear Friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Sanborn, Franklin
Date: February 19, 1857
While in Boston, Franklin Sanborn wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, a Northern abolitionist and agent with the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. The first part of the letter dealt with business, but Sanborn also mentioned a recent speech at the State House where John Brown made an appearance. He hoped that Higginson and his friends in Worcester County would aid "the good old man."

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917


Letter, John Doy to Friend [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Doy, John
Date: February 24, 1857
John Doy wrote from Lawrence to Thomas W. Higginson, relating the struggles of his family and other matters of interest in the territory. He had to sell the last of his corn crop and his pig just to make ends meet during the winter. He also briefly mentioned the Central Committee, stating that he did not ask them for relief funds or provisions, because recently they had acted improperly towards some ladies. He also informed Higginson of an altercation at Lecompton, where Missourians shot a storekeeper named Mr. Shepard, and "Sherrard their Bully late of Virginia was shot and died in a day or two." In addition, Doy spoke of the "bogus officers" and their work in the territory.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Casualties; Doy, John; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas Central Committee; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Relief; Violence


Letter, Anson J. Stone to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Stone, Anson J.
Date: March 12, 1857
This letter written by Anson Stone, assistant treasurer of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, was sent to inform Thomas Higginson of the fares for traveling to Kansas. He included the prices of tickets for each leg of the journey between Boston and Kansas City, with a total price of $34.00. Stone wrote the letter from the company's office at 3 Winter Street, Boston, Massachusetts.

Keywords: Albany, New York; Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Prices; St. Louis, Missouri; Stone, Anson J.; Transportation


Letter, Caleb S. Pratt to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Pratt, Caleb S.
Date: April 7, 1857
Caleb Pratt wrote from Delaware, Kansas Territory to Rev. T. W. Higginson, a prominent Northern abolitionist. He informed Higginson that a company of free state men had bought out a large portion of the predominantly pro-slavery town of Delaware. They sought to make it a suitable place for the entry of free state emigrants.

Keywords: Delaware City, Kansas Territory; Free state activities; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Pratt, Caleb S.; Town development


Letter, Sam. F. Tappan to Dear friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: July 6, 1857
In this letter, Samuel Tappan wrote to Thomas W. Higginson to update him on the situation in Kansas. He discussed the "bogus" constitutional convention and Gov. Walker's actions against the free state cause. He mentioned that the proslavery forces "did all they could to have us 'partake' in the bogus election without success." Tappan still had confidence that the forces of "democracy" would triumph. In the postscript, he spoke briefly of a census taken by free state leaders.

Keywords: Census; Election, Lecompton Constitution delgates to convention, June 1857; Elections; Free state movement (see also Topeka Movement); Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas Territory. Legislature; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, F. B. Sanborn to My dear Friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Sanborn, Franklin
Date: August 28, 1857
Franklin B. Sanborn, an ardent supporter of John Brown, wrote this letter in Boston to one of his associates, Thomas W. Higginson. He spoke of John Brown, who was poised on the northern border of Kansas Territory, ready to bring supplies in to relieve the free state settlers. Brown had become discouraged about the free state cause "in consequence of persons not fulfilling his expectations." Sanborn wondered if Higginson or the Worcester Committee could do something to assist Brown, especially with his financial difficulties. If the committee did not have the funds, Sanborn suggested that Higginson should seek funds from his friends and associates. In closing, Sanborn offered his support for a disunion convention.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state supporters; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Relief funds; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Worcester, Massachusetts


Letter, [Samuel] Tappan to Gen. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: March 15, 1858
In this letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Samuel Tappan informed Thomas W. Higginson of the state of affairs in Kansas. He began the letter by mentioning the constitutional convention that would soon meet at Minneola, and the hope that the free state side will be triumphant. Tappan also mentioned the recent election for mayor of Lawrence, stating that Carmi Babcock won over James Blood. The last page, tacked on as if it were a separate note, gave a brief summary of where influential leaders were currently located, so Higginson would know of their whereabouts.

Keywords: Babcock, Carmi William; Blood, James; Branscomb, Charles H.; Constitutional conventions; Conway, Martin Franklin; Free state perspective; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Lecompton Constitution; Minneola, Kansas Territory; Plumb, Preston B., 1837-1891; Roberts, William Young; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913


Letter, Sam F. Tappan to Dear Friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: April 7, 1858
Samuel F. Tappan of Lawrence wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, informing him that the last letter he received from Higginson was lost in the Kansas River while Tappan was crossing it on horseback. Tappan also told Higginson that he had been elected secretary of the Leavenworth constitutional convention meeting that month. He discussed in detail the turn out of the votes concerning negro suffrage and women's suffrage, and mentioned the joyful reaction to the defeat of a Senate bill. According to Tappan, the border warfare had ceased and "it is almost impossible to excite a war spirit in Kanzas," further stating that "we rely wholly upon numbers now, and not upon Sharp's rifles." He expressed interest in having more women emigrate to Kansas, writing that "the fact is, women are scarce in Kansas and unmarried men numerous."

Keywords: African Americans; Constitutional conventions; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, March-April 1858; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Slaves; Suffrage; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913; Topeka Movement (see also Free state movement); Voting; Women Suffrage


Letter, Ms. Maria Felt to Dear Mr. [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Felt, Maria
Date: June 25, 1858
Miss Felt wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, telling of her journey from Clinton, Massachusetts to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Apparently, she was emigrating to Kansas in order to teach school. Miss Felt and her party traveled by train until they reached Alton, Illinois, where they took a steamer along the Mississippi to St. Louis. From there they traveled to Jefferson City and finally reached Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. At that point they traveled to Lawrence by stagecoach and Indian canoe. Once she had arrived in Lawrence, which she found to be a pretty town, she became acquainted with James Redpath, R. J. Hinton, Samuel Tappan, and George Stearns. She also called on Ephraim Nute, but she disliked both him and his wife, writing that they "sat up like two icicles." This letter appears to have been edited at some later date.

Keywords: Felt, Maria; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Railroads; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Schools; St. Louis, Missouri; Stagecoaches; Steamboats; Transportation; Travel; Water transportation; Weather; Women


Letter, Sam F. Tappan to Dear Friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: April 17, 1859
In this letter, Samuel Tappan continued to keep Thomas Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts apprised of the current situation in Kansas Territory. He mentioned such topics as the Pike's Peak gold rush and the affairs of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, stating his belief that Robinson and Pomeroy were innocent of any charges of speculation. He praised John Brown's work to free slaves and the work of the Doy family in that same endeavor. However, he did not agree with Charles Robinson, who too readily looked to the interests of the Republican Party instead of supporting John Brown's work in the territory. Tappan appreciated the Atlantic Monthly magazine and Higginson's contributions to it.

Keywords: African Americans; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Doy, John; Free state perspective; Fugitive slaves; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Land speculation; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913


Letter, Sam F. Tappan to Rev. T. W. Higginson
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: June 27, 1859
The main focus of this letter, written from Lawrence by Samuel F. Tappan, is the case of Dr. John Doy, who had just been convicted of abducting slaves from Missouri. Doy had been sentenced to five years imprisonment, but his lawyers got a two month suspension so they could file an appeal with the state Supreme Court. Tappan outlined the evidence against Doy, which he said rested on the testimony of one proslavery man. He also reiterated the story behind the Doy kidnapping in case the recipient, Thomas Higginson, was not aware of all the details. The letter ended by mentioning the strength of the Democratic Party in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: African Americans; Courts; Democratic Party (U.S.); Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lawyers; Missouri; Slaves; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913


Letter, Wm Handy to Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Handy, William
Date: April 3, 1860
This letter, written in Boston by William Handy, was addressed to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a radical abolitionist minister from Worcester, Massachusetts. In this letter, Handy proposed strategies to deal with the potential arrest of James Redpath in the aftermath of Harper's Ferry. Higginson and Redpath had both supported John Brown's raid on the arsenal in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in 1859. After John Brown's execution some of his followers had fled the country, but Higginson and Redpath had both remained in the United States. Handy feared that Redpath would be arrested, so he wanted to figure out the best way to protect Redpath's rights.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Courts; Handy, William; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; United States Government


Letter, [William] Handy to My Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Handy, William
Date: April 6, 1860
This letter was written by William Handy of Boston and was addressed to Thomas W. Higginson, a supporter of John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia. Handy wanted to let Higginson know about a meeting in Boston to decide upon a plan of action. By this point, John Brown had been executed and several of his followers had fled the country. Most of those who remained in the United States wanted to resist the government; consequently, Handy emphasized that at this meeting "none but fighters are eligible." Handy believed that it would not be wise to rely on the legal system to give Brown's supporters a fair trial. Handy also spoke of a beautiful pistol that would soon be presented to Miss Sanborn "for her bravery in defending her brother." He also mentioned that Franklin Sanborn had been arrested in Concord for some misdemeanor; he was unsure of the details.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Courts; Handy, William; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917


Photograph, Thomas Wentworth Higginson
Authors: Notman Photo Co.
Date: 
Thomas Wentworth Higginson was an ardent Northern abolitionist. He also served as an agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee, procuring rifles, powder, cartridges and other materials for free state settlers in Kansas. He was from Worcester, Massachusetts, but he made a trip to Kansas in 1856.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Free state supporters; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Massachusetts; Photographs and Illustrations


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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