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27 results for Health:
Letter, Your Mary [Holliday] to My Dear H [Cyrus Kurtz Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: December 29, [1854]
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband Cyrus K. Holliday in Kansas Territory. This, the second letter he received from her, reported the health of his brother George Holliday's family and mentioned her giving money, earned by selling a locket, to his mother. Mary Holliday eloquently expressed her love and the difficulty of their separation. After joking that her cooking skill should meet Kansas Territory standards, she mentioned the plans of Lowry Trowbridge and George Merriman, Pennsylvanians with Kansas fever.

Keywords: Food; Health; Holidays; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Marriage; Meadville, Pennsylvania; New Year; Railroads


Letter, Mary [Holliday] to My Dear H [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: February 15, 1855
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday in Kansas Territory. Lonely and worried, she expressed her eagerness at joining him after the birth of their first child. She mentioned receiving a package of papers from her husband which spoke well of him. She also mentioned his mother's desire to go to Kansas Territory with them and described the well-being of friends and relatives.

Keywords: Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Marriage; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Weather


Letter, Mary [Holliday] to My Dear H [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: February 26, [1855]
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Expecting their first child March 7 or 8, Mary delicately discussed her pregnancy. She assured C. K. Holliday of her willingness to live in rough housing with him. She hesitated to send money for his trip to Meadville, as mail delivery was slow and unreliable, and encouraged him to stay until she was able to travel if best for business and their future good. She also mentioned local mad-dog attacks.

Keywords: Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Marriage; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Money; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: March 18, 1855
Writing from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday in Meadville, Pennsylvania, Cyrus K. Holliday joyfully reported receiving a letter from her. He planned to return to Meadville by the middle of April. He encouraged their friend Mr. Ingram to consider returning to Kansas Territory, but cautioned that investing in property was like buying lottery tickets. Holliday described cold weather, with snow indoors and out, and also inquired after family members' health.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Houses; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Property disputes; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Weather


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: July 29, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote letters from several cities to his wife, Mary Holliday, after leaving their home at Meadville, Pennsylvania to return to business at Topeka, Kansas Territory. Once in Lawrence, K. T., he reported the political situation to his wife. Governor Andrew H. Reeder, who expected violence, and the fraudulently elected Territorial Legislature were at loggerheads. (Holliday had been elected to the Legislature in a reelection called by Governor Reeder during Holliday's absence, but the reelection results were rejected by the Legislature.) Holliday also mentioned the good corn crop and warm weather and expressed his love for his wife and daughter, Lillie, born March 18.

Keywords: Agriculture; Crops; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Lum, S. Y; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shawnee Indian Reserve; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Violence; Weather


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: September 10, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, in good health, though others in Topeka were ill. He wanted Mary to join him, but when and with whom were undecided. He foresaw accepting the editorship of The Kansas Freeman, founded by Edward C. K. Garvey, and acquiring a farm. To Cyrus' disappointment, not he but Governor Reeder was nominated as the Kansas Territory delegate to Congress. He closed by inquiring after Lizzie and friends in Meadville.

Keywords: Big Springs Convention; Free State Convention; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Kansas Freeman; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to Edmund Jones Esq
Authors: Jones, Edmund
Date: October 1, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote to Edmund Jones in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where Jones was completing construction on Hill's new house. Hill was surprised by the amount of Jones' expenses, and he insisted that Jones negotiate payment of Mr. Johnson, the plasterer. Hill planned to visit Lawrence, but was delayed by his oldest brother's illness. Hill relayed the health of Hill family members and others. He had advised Mrs. Hill to go to Kansas to improve her health. The letter ends abruptly, without a signature, and it possibly lacks pages.

Keywords: Construction; Health; Hill, Hiram; Houses; Jones, Edmund; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; Town development


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Wife [Mary Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: October 7, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, advised his wife in Meadville, Pennsylvania concerning travel. He restated advice from his much longer letter of September 26th. He wrote of his nomination, yet to be confirmed by vote, as a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention. Holliday decided to decline the editorship of The Kansas Freeman. He expressed sympathy for Lizzie Holliday, his wife's sister, and suggested boarding when Mary Holliday and their daughter Lillie arrived, as he had not yet built a house.

Keywords: Elections; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Kansas Freeman; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka Constitutional Convention, October 1855; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Transportation; Travel


Letter, Wm E. G. [Willliam Goodnow] to My Dear Wife [Harriet Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: December 2, 1855
William Goodnow wrote a personal letter from Shannon, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Harriet, in New England. Goodnow reported that his health had never been better, as he was "full of blood & stout looking" and commented that he wished he could send her his daguerreotype to show her his appearance. He mentioned that the settlement had just witnessed its first marriage and first baby born, and that Samuel Pomeroy of the New England Emigrant Aid Company would soon be among the settlers of the area.

Keywords: Daguerreotypes; Daily life; Goodnow, Harriet; Goodnow, William E.; Health; Marriage; Park, George S.; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Shannon, Kansas Territory


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 7, 1855
In a brief letter similar to the one written to his brother on the same date, Hiram Hill told his wife that he would continue to Kansas Territory. Hill was in Richland (possibly Richmond), Missouri, on his way to Kansas City and ultimately to Lawrence, where he had heard that 1,100 free state and 800 proslavery men were prepared to fight. The governor of Missouri had called for 3,000 more to oppose the free state "Rebils." Hill, a free state supporter, assured his wife of his well-being.

Keywords: Cannons; Health; Hill, Hiram; Sharps rifles; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 7, 1855
Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts en route to Kansas City and ultimately to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, wrote from Richmond, Missouri to his brother. He relayed the murder of an unnamed free state man (likely Charles W. Dow), the gathering of 1,100 free state and 800 proslavery men at Lawrence, and other Wakarusa War events. Hill, a free state supporter, felt that the information he received from Missourians was inaccurate or exaggerated. He doubted reports that 60 proslavery men had been killed at Lawrence, or of abolitionists driving proslavery settlers from their homes. Hill reported the arrests of free state men including Judge Johnson and General Pomeroy, who he heard had escaped.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Cannons; Dow, Charles W.; Free state perspective; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery perspective; Sharps rifles; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, [Hiram Hill] to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 8, 1855 - December 9, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Westport, Missouri to his wife as he received new information concerning the Wakarusa War at Lawrence. Hill was frustrated by these reports, which conflicted and were from the proslavery perspective, and which concerned the number of free state and proslavery soldiers, the status of the war, and government action taken to prevent conflict. Hill was also troubled by shameless "traveling and drinking and swearing" and gunshots on the Sabbath. The last page of the letter expresses his relief at news of peace in Lawrence, where he would learn "the other syde of the story" upon arrival. The murder of Thomas W. Barber, who rode outside Lawrence and was shot by a proslavery supporter on December 6th, was mentioned. Hill also described an eventful stagecoach journey.

Keywords: Barber, Thomas W.; Cannons; Daily life; Free state militia; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Proslavery perspective; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Sharps rifles; Stagecoaches; Violence; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Letter, Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Authors: Hill, Hiram
Date: December 12, 1855
Hiram Hill arrived in Lawrence, Kansas Territory shortly after the end of the Wakarusa War. This letter to his wife reviewed the events of the war, made mention of women's assistance, described Hill's journey from Leavenworth with Mr. Conway, and gave an account of Thomas W. Barber's funeral, at which Charles Robinson and James Lane spoke. Barber was killed south of Lawrence on the 6th. Hill had met Mr. Whitney, Judge Johnson, Mr. Haskell, and Mr. Simpson, and planned to visit Charles Robinson. Hill also detailed Governor Shannon's settlement with free state leaders at Lawrence.

Keywords: American Indians (see also Native Americans); Funerals; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Town development; Travel; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855; Women


Letter, Mary Holliday to My Dear Husband [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: May 29, [1856]
Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania assured her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory, that although she had read in northern newspapers of the May 21st sack of Lawrence, she was willing to join him. If violence relented, she and Mr. Nichols planned to leave the following week. Previous to writing, Mary sent Cyrus all their money but what she would carry while traveling. Concerning their friends in Pennsylvania, she mentioned a death, an invitation, a sickness, and a success.

Keywords: Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Sack of Lawrence, May 1856; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory; Travel


Letter, Mary to My Dear Husband [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: August 29, 1856
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, who was presently touring Pennsylvania to speak in support of Republican presidential nominee John C. Fremont. Mary mentioned Mr. Howe, L. Lord, and Alfred Huidekoper, all friends of Cyrus. William D. Paul, who lived in Shawnee County, Kansas Territory had written. Quoting from his letter, Mary reported a skirmish between free state and proslavery men at Franklin, in Douglas County. Henry C. Titus, colonel of proslavery troops, and Israel B. Donal[d]son, U. S. marshal, had been taken prisoner. Governor Wilson Shannon had negotiated a treaty. Mary also mentioned her ill health, and she hoped that Cyrus was well.

Keywords: Battles; Donalson, Israel B.; Franklin, Kansas Territory; Free state; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Missourians; Paul, William D.; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Titus, Henry Theodore


Letter, Mary Holliday to My Dear Husband [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Mary
Date: August 31, 1856
Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania reported the contents of a letter her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, had received from William D. Paul of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Cyrus was speaking in New Castle, PA on the behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Paul wrote that Harry G. Young was living in Cyrus' Topeka house. Milton C. Dickey and Dr. George A. Cutler had returned to Topeka without weapons, to the disappointment of the "Topeka boys," who anticipated conflict with Missourians. Mary recommended reading the New York Times. She wrote of her dissatisfaction with their separation and readiness to emigrate to Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Cutler, George A.; Dickey, Milton C.; Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Missourians; Paul, William D.; Roberts, William Young


Kansas Experience of Charles E. Dewey
Authors: Dewey, Charles E.
Date: December 24, 1856
In this testimony, Charles E. Dewey described how his family and others in their party traveled to Kansas from Ohio. The group sought advice from S. C. Pomeroy about where to settle, and at his urging, they located on South Pottawatomie Creek, possibly in Anderson County. He included in this testimony the names and stories of people that he encountered on his journey and during his early years in the territory. One particularly interesting account was the conflict between a group of Germans and Dewey's party over possession of land claims. Dewey also included details of the difficulties for settlers in Kansas Territory during the years 1855 and 1856. Furthermore, within this testimony he states the experiences of the Winkly brothers who were boarding with him.

Keywords: Adair, Samuel Lyle; Claims (see Damage claims or Land claims); Crops; Dewey, Charles E.; Emigration and immigration; Germans; Health; Illness; Land claim disputes; Land claims; Livestock; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Pottawatomie Creek, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Transportation; Weather


Letter, S. [Samuel] L. Adair to Mr. J. B. [John Brown]
Authors: Adair, Samuel Lyle
Date: October 2, 1857
Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Daily life; Election fraud; Election, Territorial Legislature, October 1857; Free State Party; Free state prospects; Free state support; Health; Land claims; Lecompton Land Office; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Preemption law United States; Proslavery supporters; Sickness (see Illness); Slave power; Tabor, Iowa; Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869


Letter, Nathan Starks to Hiram Hill Esq
Authors: Starks, Nathan
Date: March 8, 1858
Nathan Starks wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, asking for Hill's assistance in securing his old homestead in Massachusetts. Starks described his situation: he had moved to K.T. seeking better health and business, but had been disappointed in both of those, the social scene, and the lawlessness of the land. He hoped to return to his old homestead in Massachusetts after a year of life in Kansas Territory, provided that it had not been sold.

Keywords: Daily life; Domestics; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Emigration and immigration; Health; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts; Mills and mill-work; Real estate investment; Starks, Nathan


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister, and Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 23, 1858
From Lawrence, Kagi wrote that he had spent several weeks at Osawatomie caring for "Old B." [John Brown], who had "now quite recovered." Things were hard right then, but Kagi was confident that "better times [were] dawning" and that his reward would certainly come "in the end," since "the success of [their] great cause" was "drawing very near." "Few of my age have toiled harder or suffered more in this cause than I, and yet I regret nothing that I have done; nor am I in any discouraged at the future."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Health; Kagi, John Henry; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, Your Affectionate Husband & Father [John Brown] to Dear Wife [Mary Brown] & Children All
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: March 2, 1859
From Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa, Brown wrote this short letter to tell his family that all was "well," despite that persistent "ague," and to discuss some family business matters: buying a team, etc.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, Mary Ann Day, 1816-1884; Health; Horses; Iowa


Letter, C. K. Holliday to Dear Mary [Holliday]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: March 31, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to their second child, Charles. Cyrus had been joined in Kansas Territory by his mother and two brothers, James T. and George K. Holliday. Cyrus sadly told of his mother's death at George's home in Wakarusa, Kansas Territory. He suggested that Mary wait to return to Topeka until May 1st, when Alfred Huidekoper of Meadville would issue him a loan. Cyrus also mentioned his political aspirations and two upcoming elections, the first at the Osawatomie Republican Convention, the second for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention.

Keywords: Health; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Holliday, Mary; Loans; Shawnee County, Kansas Territory; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Ellen D. G. [Goodnow] to My Dear Husband [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, Ellen
Date: August 16, 1859
Ellen Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to her husband, Isaac, who was traveling on the East coast. Ellen updated him on the progress of Bluemont College's construction, and suggested that they move into the school building temporarily to keep watch over loose supplies ("anything moveable is in danger"), especially doors and windows. She recounted an incident in which a housemate's accident left him with a deep headwound and included details of the treatment. Goodnow also listed more supplies that she needed from the East, gave Isaac clothing suggestions to keep healthy, and expressed her fatigue at running the household without him.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Construction; Denison, Joseph; Domestics; Goodnow, Ellen; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Health; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Marlott, Washington; Medicine; Riley County, Kansas Territory; School buildings; Wounds and injuries


Letter, J. J. I. [John James Ingalls] to Dear Father [Elias T. Ingalls]
Authors: Ingalls, John James
Date: August 21, 1860
The biggest share of this 8-page letter is devoted to comments on the weather and the environment, in and around Atchison, where Ingalls now had a law practice (for a time, he continued to live in Sumner). He missed some aspects of "Massachusetts weather," but overall he thought Kansas superior: "I have not had a cold in six months and but one or two since I came here . . . [and] The attacks of melancholy and despondency to which I was once a prey have also almost entirely disappeared." Ingalls also wrote of two arson fires--"a large grocery house" and "the steamer Hesperian," and the expected fate of the suspect then in custody.

Keywords: Atchison, Kansas Territory; Fires; Health; Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900; Judicial system (see Courts); Lynch, Judge; Massachusetts; Steamboats; Vigilance committees; Weather


Letter, A. Venard, MD to Thaddeus Hyatt
Authors: Venard, A.
Date: October 3, 1860
This letter is from A. Venard, a medical doctor from Pleasant Grove, Kansas Territory who wrote to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter dealt with the sickness and disease that plagued the settlers along the Verdigris River in southeast Kansas. Dr. Venard had worked diligently to aid the settlers, even using funds from his own pocket to purchase medicine, but he requested that the committee give him 100 dollars worth of drugs. Attached to this letter is an itemized listing of the drugs that he would like to be purchased with those funds.

Keywords: Diseases; Health; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Medicine; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Sickness (see Illness); Vegetables; Venard, A.


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to James Buchanan
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: October 16, 1860
Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to the President of the United States in an effort to obtain assistance for the suffering inhabitants of Kansas. He described in detail the needs of the settlers, including their lack of adequate winter clothing and the scarcity of food. According to his personal observations, Hyatt concluded that the only options left to Kansas settlers were exodus or starvation. He also asked that all government lands be removed from the market, especially those in the New York Indian Reserve.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Diseases; Droughts; Economic conditions; Famines; Food; Health; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Indian reserves; Relief; Sickness (see Illness)


Letter, Wm [William Goodnow] to Dear Brother [Isaac Goodnow]
Authors: Goodnow, William E.
Date: December 22, 1860
William Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his brother Isaac Goodnow, updating him on personal and business matters. He reported that the plastering and joint work in the College building was mostly done, and that he had ceased to work on the construction of their own new house until the spring. Responding to the secession of South Carolina, William exclaimed that the Union had been "smashed into a cocked hat!" He added that the Denison family was well but for colds, and confirmed that those settlers who had suffered on account of the drought and poor economic conditions were receiving aid.

Keywords: Bluemont Central College; Construction; Denison, Joseph; Economic conditions; Goodnow, Isaac T., 1814-1894; Goodnow, William E.; Health; Relief; School buildings; Secession; South Carolina


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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