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21 results for Harpers Ferry, Virginia:
John Brown portrait
Authors: Ruggles, Quartus
Date: 1855-1859
John Brown portrait by Quartus Ruggles, 1889. Brown was an abolitionist who came to Kansas in 1855. Although in the territory for only about three years, he was involved in several skirmishes and helped free some Missouri slaves. Brown was hanged for treason on December 2, 1859 for attempting to overtake the U.S. arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia.

Keywords: Art; Artist; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Objects; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Ruggles, Quartus; Slavery


Letter, J. H. Kagi to "My dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: December 27, 1857
On December 27 (or perhaps 29), Kagi wrote this letter to his sister from Springdale, Iowa, in the midst of "a very long & tedious journey." He informed her that his party would leave on the "cars" for Chicago soon, but cautioned her "not for your life" to tell anyone where he was or what he was about, and told her that he would soon be taking an assumed name. [According to historian Stephen Oates, To Purge This Land With Blood, John Brown returned to Kansas in November 1857 and enlisted Kagi and a few others in a new company, which set out in early December for Ohio and some additional training in preparation for Brown's planned assault on the Slave Power in Virginia; on the way, around numerous campfires, Brown apparently encouraged and instructed his young recruits on the just nature of their cause, etc. As it turned out, the company wintered at Springdale while Brown went alone to Ohio.]

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Iowa; Kagi, John Henry


Letter, Maurice Maitland [J. H. Kagi] to "My Dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: March 5, 1858
On his 23rd birthday, March 5, 1858, Kagi (now alias "Maurice Maitland") wrote a very circumspect letter from Springdale, Iowa, expressing his satisfaction with "the present plitical prospects"--"Every thing is working just to suit me--nothing could suit me better"--and his interest in knowing "what you have learned about J. H." (presumably, himself, J.H. Kagi).

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Springdale, Iowa


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister, father and others"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: August 13, 1858
By June 28, 1858, J. H. Kagi was back in K.T. at Lawrence, and on August 13 he was writing the family from Moneka, Linn County, where he had "been very busily engaged in fortifying along the State line to prevent further inroads from Missouri." [See J.B. letter of August 3 to Wm. Hutchinson in which he speaks of building the fort on the site of the Marie des Cygnes Massacre.] In an unusually open and frank few lines, Kagi wrote: "C. W. Moffet and two of the other boys (whom you have not seen) are in Ashtabula Co., Ohio. Some have gone to Harpers Ferry. We are all ready and in good spirits. Things are working rightly, here, and brightening elsewhere for our final work. Those who once thought us the most foolish, now think most cheerfully of the whole plan." He closed by asking that they write him at the "Whitney House" in Lawrence.

Keywords: Ashtabula County, Ohio; Border disputes and warfare; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Missouri; Moffett, Charles; Moneka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister, and Father"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 23, 1858
From Lawrence, Kagi wrote that he had spent several weeks at Osawatomie caring for "Old B." [John Brown], who had "now quite recovered." Things were hard right then, but Kagi was confident that "better times [were] dawning" and that his reward would certainly come "in the end," since "the success of [their] great cause" was "drawing very near." "Few of my age have toiled harder or suffered more in this cause than I, and yet I regret nothing that I have done; nor am I in any discouraged at the future."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Health; Kagi, John Henry; Moneka, Kansas Territory; Sickness (see Illness); Trading Post, Kansas Territory; Wattles, Augustus


Letter, Kagi to "My Dear Sister"
Authors: Kagi, John Henry
Date: June 8, 1859
From Cleveland, Ohio, Kagi jokingly wrote his sister that in the absence of any letters from the family, he had feared they had set off for "Pikes Peak, and had died of suffering on the route, as others have." Kagi expected to leave in order to take up his "business in earnest" shortly--that is, to implement Brown's plan and move on Harpers Ferry.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Crops; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Kagi, John Henry; Pikes Peak gold rush; Weather


Letter, William Leeman to "Dear Mother"
Authors: Leeman, William H.
Date: October 2, 1859
From "Harpers Ferry" about two weeks before the raid that took his life, William H. Leeman wrote his mother that, although he didn't want to worry her, he was "waring with Slavery the greatest Curse that ever infested America," and he fully expected the entire South to be "free" by the time they finished. He had "been Engaged [for the past three years] in a Secret Asosiation [sic] of as gallaint fellows as ever puled a trigger with the sole purpose of the Extermination of Slavery," and they were now ready and "determined to strike for Freedom Incite the Slaves to Rebelion and Establish a free government."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Leeman, William H.; Slaveholders; Slavery


Letter, "C. Whipple [A.D. Stevens] to "Jenny" [Dunbar]
Authors: Stevens, Aaron D.
Date: October 7, 1859
The last of three "love letters" written by Aaron D. Stevens, alias Charles Whipple, to a girl he apparently had only recently met but with whom he desperately desired a closer relationship was dated October 7, 1859, "near Harper's Ferry." (He had been writing for at least a month and had not received a letter from her.) Stevens rode with John Brown in Kansas, participated in the Harpers Ferry raid on October 18, 1859, and died on the Charlestown gallows in the spring of 1860.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Jayhawkers


John Brown pike
Authors: Collins and Company
Date: October 18, 1859
Pike used by slaves at the insurrection planned by John Brown at the U.S. arsenal in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, October 18, 1859. Armed with pikes and guns, Brown's army, primarily slaves, took hostages from the community and took over the arsenal. Brown's army was overwhelmed by U.S. troops led by Colonel Robert E. Lee. Brown was tried and hanged for treason on December 2, 1859.

Keywords: Blair, Charles; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Casualties; Collinsville, Connecticut; Courts; Free state cause; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Objects; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Swords and daggers; United States Government; Violence; Violent deaths; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, John Brown to Hon. Thos. Russell
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: October 21, 1859
From his jail cell in Charles Town, Virginia, just days before he was to go on trial for treason, John Brown wrote seeking legal counsel for himself and fellow prisoners. Brown mentioned his wounds, but said they were "doing well," expresses special concern for "the young men prisoners," and closed "Do not send an ultra Abolitionist."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Charles Town, Virginia; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Lawyers; Russell, Thomas; Slavery


Letter, H. B. Hurd to E. B. Whitman Esq.
Authors: Hurd, H. B.
Date: October 26, 1859
H. B. Hurd, the secretary of the National Kansas Committee, Chicago, Illinois, wrote to assure Whitman that he (Whitman) had "full authority to act in reference to said notes & accounts," not Capt. John Brown.

Keywords: Blood, James; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Charles Town, Virginia; Chicago, Illinois; Doy, John; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hurd, H. B.; National Kansas Committee; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, G. [George] W. Brown to John Halderman
Authors: Brown, George W (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: November 1, 1859
From Lawrence, the editor of the Herald of Freedom, George W. Brown, wrote Halderman concerning the next issue of the paper which was to be "an awful one for Conway--presumably Martin F. Conway, an active free state partisan who was to be elected the first U.S. congressman to represent Kansas on December 6, 1859. Obviously, the newspaper had less impact than Brown anticipated, as J. A. Halderman, the Democratic nominee, lost decisively to Conway, 7,674 to 5,567. Brown had believed that his forthcoming issue should be widely distributed and was seeking additional orders from Halderman.

Keywords: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915; Conway, Martin Franklin; Halderman, John Adams; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Herald of Freedom; Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864; Newspapers; Partisan press; Topeka Tribune; United States. Congress


Letter, H. O. Wagoner to Wendell Phillips, Esqr.
Authors: Wagoner, Henry O.
Date: November 6, 1859
H.O. Wagoner of Chicago, who had entertained John Brown one afternoon in the fall of 1858, wrote to one of the nation's leading abolitionist supporters of Brown, Wendell Phillips of Boston, Mass., regarding the latter's "oration, delivered in Brooklyn, on the character--facts of history, and circumstances with reference to 'Capt John Brown,' that noblest of God's heroes, who struck the great blow at Harper's Ferry."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery movements; Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Chicago, Illinois; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Osawatomie, Battle of; Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884; Wagoner, Henry O.


Letter, John Q. Anderson to "Capt [John] Brown"
Authors: Anderson, John Q.
Date: November 25, 1859
John Anderson, of Eddyville, Iowa, the brother of one of the Harpers Ferry raiders, Jeremiah Goldsmith Anderson, wrote to Captain Brown, who was awaiting execution in Charlestown, Va., jail, seeking more information about his brother's death at Harpers Ferry. He had been "two years a target in Kansas for the Border Ruffians and all, for what? Why because he purchased a claim & wished to settle on it & live by the sweat of his own brow. And now has died trying to enforce the golden rule."

Keywords: Anderson, Jeremiah G.; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state settlers; Harpers Ferry, Virginia


Letter, A. D. Stevens to "My Dear Friend" [Jennie Dunbar]
Authors: Stevens, Aaron D.
Date: December 3, 1859
From his jail cell at Charlestown, Virginia, Stevens wrote his love interest, Jennie (recepient information is on a handwritten copy, also in folder 10), regarding his actions and prospects ("Slavery demands that we should hang for its protection") and the fact that he regretted nothing except that he would not live to "see this Country free."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Charles Town, Virginia; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Slave power; Slavery


Letter, L. F. Parsons to "Dear Friends Redpath & Hinton"
Authors: Parsons, Luke F.
Date: December 1859
Parsons, "a soldier under John Brown" in Kansas, who fought in the battles of Black Jack and Osawatomie (see, Twenty-fifth Biennial Report, KSHS, 135-136), wrote this letter from Osawatomie to James Redpath and Richard J. Hinton in response to their "notice in the Republican in regard to publishing the life of John Brown & associates at Harpers Ferry & your request for information." In addition to his Kansas activities, Parsons was with Brown and company in Iowa during the winter of 1857-58 and mentions, as did Kagi and others, the "Lyceums" conducted by Brown around their evening campfires and the "thorough course of military instruction under Col. Whipple as Drillmaster." Parsons, who was obviously proud of his association with Brown, apparently just missed being in on the Harpers Ferry raid--he had returned to KT during the long wait and was not recalled.

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Owen; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Coppoc, Barclay; Coppoc, Edwin; Forbes, Hugh; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas City Metropolitan; Kansas City, Missouri; Leeman, William H.; Moffett, Charles; Osawatomie, Battle of; Parsons, Luke F.; Pate, Henry Clay; Quakers (see Society of Friends); Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Rice, Benjamin; Springdale, Iowa; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tabor, Iowa; Tidd, C. P.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, C [Charles Robinson] to My Dear S [Sara Robinson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: January 20, 1860
Charles Robinson wrote several letters to his wife in Lawrence as he traveled East in January 1860. From the Astor House, New York, on January 20, he wrote that Congress was not yet in session and that everyone expected the Democrats to oppose Kansas admission. It was possible that Robinson could "be sent for as a witness in Harpers Ferry affair" (Congressional investigation/hearings).

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; New York; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Robinson, Sara T. L. (Sara Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911; Statehood (see also Admission, Kansas); United States. Congress


Letter, John Ritchey to My Dear Friend [A. D.] Stevens
Authors: Ritchie, John , 1817-1887
Date: March 6, 1860
From Franklin, Indiana, on March 6, 1860, John Ritchey wrote to Aaron Steven, one of the Harpers Ferry raiders still awaiting execution in Virginia, that it "it is gratafying to me, to find you, so willing to meet your sentence."

Keywords: Abolitionists; Antislavery perspective; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Slavery; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Stowe, Harriet Beecher; Uncle Tom's Cabin


Letter, John Ritchey to "Friend Stevens" [A.D. Stevens]
Authors: Ritchie, John , 1817-1887
Date: March 7, 1860
Topeka's "John Ritchey" [Ritchie] wrote this letter dated March 7, 1860, to A. D. Stevens from Franklin, Indiana, where he had "been spending the winter with his family." Although Ritchey mentioned John Brown and his own fervent views in opposition to "Slavery," the focus of his brief comments to his former Kansas comrade, who was scheduled to die on the Charlestown gallows on March 17, were an expression of concern for Steven's eternal soul: "I can see but one way left for me to be of any service to you and that is to direct your mind to the Savior. 'Ye must be born again.'"

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Charles Town, Virginia; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Religion; Ritchie, John, 1817-1887; Slavery; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Topeka boys; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Letter, Wm Handy to Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Handy, William
Date: April 3, 1860
This letter, written in Boston by William Handy, was addressed to Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a radical abolitionist minister from Worcester, Massachusetts. In this letter, Handy proposed strategies to deal with the potential arrest of James Redpath in the aftermath of Harper's Ferry. Higginson and Redpath had both supported John Brown's raid on the arsenal in Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in 1859. After John Brown's execution some of his followers had fled the country, but Higginson and Redpath had both remained in the United States. Handy feared that Redpath would be arrested, so he wanted to figure out the best way to protect Redpath's rights.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Courts; Handy, William; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; United States Government


Letter, [William] Handy to My Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Handy, William
Date: April 6, 1860
This letter was written by William Handy of Boston and was addressed to Thomas W. Higginson, a supporter of John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia. Handy wanted to let Higginson know about a meeting in Boston to decide upon a plan of action. By this point, John Brown had been executed and several of his followers had fled the country. Most of those who remained in the United States wanted to resist the government; consequently, Handy emphasized that at this meeting "none but fighters are eligible." Handy believed that it would not be wise to rely on the legal system to give Brown's supporters a fair trial. Handy also spoke of a beautiful pistol that would soon be presented to Miss Sanborn "for her bravery in defending her brother." He also mentioned that Franklin Sanborn had been arrested in Concord for some misdemeanor; he was unsure of the details.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Courts; Handy, William; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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