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25 results for Fugitive slaves:
Quindaro Desk
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856-1861
Walnut desk used by abolitionist Fielding Johnson in Quindaro, Kansas. The word "Quindaro" is painted on the back of the desk. The town of Quindaro was settled by anti-slavery activists. Johnson, a merchant and agent to the Delaware Indians, was known to aid fugitive slaves.

Keywords: Abolitionists; Daily life; Delaware Indians; Fugitive slaves; Furniture; House furnishings; Immigration (see Emigration and immigration); Johnson, Fielding; Merchants; Objects; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Settlement; Underground railroad; Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory


Circular Letter, Underground Rail Road Depot, To the Friends of the Fugitives from Slavery
Authors: Abbott, William E.; Allen, Joseph A.; Fuller, James ; Knight, Horace B.; Loguen, Jermain Wesley; May, Samuel J.; Ormsbee, Lucius J.
Date: March 4, 1858
This printed, circular dated Syracuse, March 4, 1858, announce the dissolution of the Syracuse Fugitive Aid Society and directed all "Fugitives" interested in such assistance in the future to contact Rev. J. W. Loguen of that place who would assume "the entire care of the Fugitives who may stop at Syracuse.

Keywords: Abbott, William E.; African Americans; Allen, Joseph A.; Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895; Fugitive slaves; Fuller, James; Knight, Horace B.; Loguen, Jermain Wesley; May, Samuel J.; Ormsbee, Lucius J.; Syracuse, New York; Underground railroad


Letter, John Brown to Gents [Old Brown's Parallels]
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: January 3, 1859
Designated "Old Brown's Parallels" and dated January 3, 1859, from Trading Post, Kansas, this is one of the better-known John Brown documents from Kansas. Written for publication in the newspapers just before his final departure from the territory, Brown began by stating "two parallels"--one being the failure of government to do anything about the murder of free-state men (Marias des Cygnes Massacre) May 1858; the other being his recent raid into Missouri to free eleven slaves and take "some property." In the latter incident, only one white man, a slave owner, was killed, but "all 'Hell is stirred from beneath,'" as the governor of Missouri was demanding the capture of those "concerned in the last named 'dreadful outrage.'"

Keywords: African Americans; Border disputes and warfare - Free state perspective; Border disputes and warfare - Proslavery perspective; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Buchanan administration; Civil rights; Free State Party; Fugitive slaves; Hamilton, Charles A.; Jayhawking; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Missouri; Press and propaganda; Slaveholders; Slaves; Trading Post, Kansas Territory


Letter, Mary [Brown] to Dear Brother Willie [Brown]
Authors: Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884
Date: January 30, 1859
This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, was addressed to her brother William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

Keywords: Brown, John S.; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Doy, John; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Missourians


Letter, [E. Nute] to [Unidentified recipient]
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: February 14, 1859
Ephraim Nute wrote from Lawrence on February 14, 1859, regarding "the disaster that befel the last expedition from this place with fugitives." The party, led by Dr. John Doy, was in route to Oskaloosa when captured and taken to Missouri, where "the colored people, both free and slaves, have been shipped for the New Orleans market." Doy and his son had been jailed at Platte City, Missouri, and were to be tried for "stealing a slave from Weston." Nute was quite sure this operation had been betrayed from within, as "Great rewards were offered, spies sent out & men hired in this place to watch & aid in recovering the run away property."

Keywords: African Americans; Border disputes and warfare; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Holton, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Nute, Ephraim; Oskaloosa, Kansas Territory; Spurs, Battle of the; Underground railroad; United States marshals; United States. Army


Letter, E. N. [Ephraim Nute] to Unidentified recipient
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: February 24, 1859
Ephaim Nute of Lawrence provides an interesting description of the plight of one of the Doy party's fugitive slaves, captured and jailed at Platte City until his escape and dangerous flight back to Lawrence. "We have him now hid & are to day making arrangements to have him set forward tomorrow 30 miles to another depot. I think they (there are 2 others to go) will not be taken again without bloodshed." Nute also mentioned his involvement in the "Charley Fisher affair in Leavenworth." Fisher, a black fugitive, had actually come to Nute's house "disguised in female attire."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Canada; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, John; Fisher, Charley; Free state cause; Fugitive slaves; Jefferson County, Kansas Territory; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Missouri River; Nute, Ephraim; Platte City, Missouri; Proslavery settlers; Underground railroad


Letter, E. Nute to F. B. Sanborn Esq.
Authors: Nute, Ephraim
Date: March 22, 1859
Ephraim Nute's efforts on behalf of "4 more fugitives," including Charley Fisher of Leavenworth, and the activities of "manhunters" in and around Lawrence are the main focus of this letter to F. B. Sanborn, but Nute also mentions the continuing need for money to pay for Doy's defense. The trial was to begin at St. Joseph the next day.

Keywords: Conway, Martin Franklin; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, John; Fisher, Charley; Fugitive slaves; Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Nute, Ephraim; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Underground railroad


Letter, Sam F. Tappan to Dear Friend [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: April 17, 1859
In this letter, Samuel Tappan continued to keep Thomas Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts apprised of the current situation in Kansas Territory. He mentioned such topics as the Pike's Peak gold rush and the affairs of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, stating his belief that Robinson and Pomeroy were innocent of any charges of speculation. He praised John Brown's work to free slaves and the work of the Doy family in that same endeavor. However, he did not agree with Charles Robinson, who too readily looked to the interests of the Republican Party instead of supporting John Brown's work in the territory. Tappan appreciated the Atlantic Monthly magazine and Higginson's contributions to it.

Keywords: African Americans; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Doy, John; Free state perspective; Fugitive slaves; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Kansas City, Kansas Territory; Land speculation; Pikes Peak gold rush; Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Slaves; Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913


Letter, William F. Creitz to "Col. James Redpath"
Authors: Creitz, William F.
Date: December 17, 1859
William F. Creitz of Holton, who had served under Aaron Stevens as captain of a Kansas militia company, wrote Redpath regarding "the particulars of 'Old John Brown's' final departure from this territory." Brown and company, which included "eleven fugitives," reached Holton on January 27, 1859, and Creitz described the events that followed, to which he was an "eyewitness" and participant, including the Battle of the Spurs. Creitz's "article" was prepared "to assist you [Redpath] in your praiseworthy undertaking that of publishing the lives of those heroic men." Redpath published "Echoes of Harper's Ferry" in 1860, and Richard J. Hinton used this material in his "John Brown and His Men (1894).

Keywords: Abolitionists; Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886; Battles; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Free state militia; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Holton, Kansas Territory; Jackson County, Kansas Territory (see also Calhoun County, Kansas Territory); Kagi, John Henry; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Militia; Nebraska Territory; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Sharps rifles; Slave power; Spurs, Battle of the; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Topeka, Kansas Territory; Underground railroad; United States marshals


Letter, Wm. Keller to Sir Mr. [Thomas H. ?] Webb
Authors: Keller, William
Date: December 20, 1859
From Cottonwood Falls, Kansas Territory, on December 20, 1859, William Keller wrote to Thomas H. Webb (Boston, New England Emigrant Aid Co.) regarding the events leading up to (Missouri raid in late December) and including the so-called Battle of the Spurs, January 31, 1859, involving "old John Brown," some of his men, and eleven fugitive slaves.

Keywords: Abolitionists; African Americans; Battles; Boston, Massachusetts; Brown, Frederick; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Cottonwood Falls, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Keller, William; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Slaves; Spurs, Battle of the; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Topeka Academy; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866; Whipple, Charles (see also Stevens, Aaron)


Letter, John E. Stewart to My Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Stewart, John E.
Date: December 20, 1859
John E. Stewart wrote from Wakarusa, Kansas to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, describing his work on the underground railroad. This letter detailed the inclement weather and difficulties he encountered as he helped slaves to escape from Missouri, as well as his procedure for locating the slaves and hiding them in his wagon. Stewart sought to gain assistance from Hyatt, mainly in the form of provisions and horses. He also needed advice about what to do with the escaped slaves to ensure that they were not captured and sold again into slavery.

Keywords: Abolitionists; African Americans; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Horses; Iowa; Missouri; Nebraska Territory; Relief; Slaves; Stewart, John E.; Underground railroad; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, L. F. Parsons to "Dear Friends Redpath & Hinton"
Authors: Parsons, Luke F.
Date: December 1859
Parsons, "a soldier under John Brown" in Kansas, who fought in the battles of Black Jack and Osawatomie (see, Twenty-fifth Biennial Report, KSHS, 135-136), wrote this letter from Osawatomie to James Redpath and Richard J. Hinton in response to their "notice in the Republican in regard to publishing the life of John Brown & associates at Harpers Ferry & your request for information." In addition to his Kansas activities, Parsons was with Brown and company in Iowa during the winter of 1857-58 and mentions, as did Kagi and others, the "Lyceums" conducted by Brown around their evening campfires and the "thorough course of military instruction under Col. Whipple as Drillmaster." Parsons, who was obviously proud of his association with Brown, apparently just missed being in on the Harpers Ferry raid--he had returned to KT during the long wait and was not recalled.

Keywords: Black Jack, Battle of; Brown, Jason; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Brown, John, Jr.; Brown, Owen; Cleveland, Ohio; Cook, John E.; Coppoc, Barclay; Coppoc, Edwin; Forbes, Hugh; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Harpers Ferry, Virginia; Hinton, Richard Josiah; Kagi, John Henry; Kansas City Metropolitan; Kansas City, Missouri; Leeman, William H.; Moffett, Charles; Osawatomie, Battle of; Parsons, Luke F.; Pate, Henry Clay; Quakers (see Society of Friends); Realf, Richard , 1834-1878; Redpath, James, 1833-1891; Rice, Benjamin; Springdale, Iowa; Stevens, Aaron Dwight (see also Whipple, Charles); Tabor, Iowa; Tidd, C. P.; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Citizens of Lawrence! L. Arms in area for negro hunting
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: c. 1860
This document warned the citizens of Lawrence that a U.S Marshal named L[eonard] Arms was searching Lawrence for slaves and that they had the right to keep him out of their homes.

Keywords: African Americans; Arms, Leonard; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Eldridge House; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Slavery; Slaves; United States marshals


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Father [Thomas Ewing, Sr.]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: April 21, 1860
Three days after he argued for the defense in a fugitive slave case, Ewing, Jr., reported to his father (Thomas Ewing, Sr., Ohio) that his "argument on the motion [i.e., to quash the indictment against one of the nine Leavenworth citizens, including D.R. Anthony, charged with the violation] added greatly to my stature as a lawyer in the public view." This opportunity arose in connection with the so-called "Charley Fisher rescue cases." (See coverage in the Daily Times, Leavenworth, April 19, 1860, and April 24, 1860.)

Keywords: Anthony, Daniel R.; Courts; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Fisher, Charley; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Pettit, John; Territorial Supreme Court (see Kansas Territory. Supreme Court); United States. District Court (Kansas Territory); Vaughan, Champion


Letter, Joseph Gardner to George L. Stearns
Authors: Gardner, Joseph
Date: May 29, 1860
Joseph Gardner, a free-state partisan of Douglas County and member of the Doy rescue party, wrote Stearns requesting firearms and ammunition as there were people in the vicinity of St. Joseph, Mo., who reportedly were preparing to "make war upon my house." Word had reportedly gone out that Gardner was "harboring fugitives" [fugitive slaves).

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Firearms; Fugitive slaves; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; St. Joseph, Missouri; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Underground railroad


$200 Reward!
Authors: Williams, G. D.
Date: June 7, 1860
Wanted poster of two slaves from Saline County, Missouri. Includes the names and descriptions of the two slaves. Poster is on display in the Kansas Museum of History, Topeka, Kansas.

Keywords: African Americans; Broadsides; Fugitive slaves; Missouri; Money; Slavery; Slaves


Letter, Joseph Gardner to George L. Stearns
Authors: Gardner, Joseph
Date: June 9, 1860
From Lawrence, Kansas, Joseph Gardner described one of the last battles of the border war. The attack Gardner had feared came "last night between 12 & 1." With the arms Stearns had made available, the attackers were repulsed, but "one of my [Gardner's] colored men, who had fought most nobly," took "a tremendous charge of buck shot" and died. His last words were "fight, fight hard!!"

Keywords: African Americans; Battles; Border ruffians; Clinton, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Firearms; Fugitive slaves; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Washington Creek, Kansas Territory


Letter, James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: October 6, 1860
Having returned from a trip to the East (where he visited Stearns, Horace Greeley, and others in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia), Montgomery wrote from Mound City, Linn County, that he "found the people greatly excited." News of violence directed against free state men in Texas and Arkansas had awakened Kansans' sense of urgency, as Montgomery continued his efforts to free slaves and undercut the slave economy of western Missouri.

Keywords: Arkansas; Border ruffians; Free state supporters; Fugitive slaves; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Texas


Letter, James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: November 27, 1860
From Mound City, James Montgomery wrote Stearns about recent trouble at Fort Scott and acting governor George M. Beebe's visit. He came, according to Montgomery, to ascertain for himself if the rumors about Montgomery's activities were correct. He left satisfied that the free staters were acting properly and "promising to do what he could to reform abuses" in the federal courts and protect their rights. Although things were quiet at present and Montgomery mentioned the arrival of more fugitive slaves, who could now stay safely in Kansas, he warned that the introduction of federal troops into southern Kansas would create an explosive situation.

Keywords: Beebe, George Monroe; Bowie knife; Democratic Party (U.S.); Firearms; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Jennison, Charles Ransford, 1834-1884; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sharps rifles; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Dr. C. R. Jennison to Dear friend [George L. Stearns]
Authors: Jennison, Charles Rainsford, 1834-1884
Date: November 28, 1860
From Mound City, Jennison opened his letter to Stearns by acknowledging that the two men did not know each other but Jennison counted Stearns "a true friend to the cause of freedom." Jennison told him about the so-called "desperadoes known as Kidnapers" who had been active in the region. After warning them of serious consequences if caught and convicted of "man hunting," Jennison's free state force captured, tried, and hung one Russ Hinds. Despite the threat from Gen. William S. Harney's federal troops, Jennison insisted "we are detirmined to Stand or fall by our weight for we have taken our position and it is honorable and Just." Federal troops were unfairly targeting free staters and ignoring proslave outrages.

Keywords: Beebe, George Monroe; Free state cause; Fugitive slaves; Hamelton, Charles A.; Harney, William S.; Hinds, Russell; Jennison, Charles Ransford, 1834-1884; Kidnapping; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Proslavery activities; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; United States. Army


Letter, J.M. [James Montgomery] to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: December 12, 1860
Montgomery wrote again from Mound City to update Stearns on the activities of "old Harney" (General William S. Harney) and the futile federal government efforts at "enforcing the Fugitive Slave law on us here; it can't be done." Montgomery insisted that despite the government's effort to portray "'Montgomery and his band'" as not of the people, popular support for his activities had just been unanimously endorsed at a mass meeting in Mound City.

Keywords: Free state perspective; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Harney, William S.; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; United States. Army; Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866


Letter, J.M. [James Montgomery] to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: December 14, 1860
In response to a letter dated November 29, Montgomery informed Stearns that "Uncle Sam has stolen all my late corrispondence [sic]. I suppose he thinks he will find some Treason in it:--He is welcome to all he can find." Much of the news about his activities and intention, insisted Montgomery, was simply newspaper talk. "'Montgomery's Band' is a myth. Montgomery's men are the people, and Montgomery himslef is one them. [sic]." He was very interested in getting the press back East to inform the public of "the real state of affairs here."

Keywords: Free labor; Free state activities; Fugitive slaves; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Linn County, Kansas Territory; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; United States. Army


Tintype of African American woman
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1860
Tintype of unidentified African American woman, circa 1860. This photo was passed down through generations of the Platt family. Jireh Platt was an active abolitionist in Mendon, Illinois. His sons Enoch and Luther, members of the Beecher Bible and Rifle Colony, settled in Wabaunsee County where they operated a station on the Underground Railroad. The Platts may have helped this woman escape to freedom. The fact that she is wearing a wedding ring is significant, as slaves weren't legally allowed to marry.

Keywords: Abolitionists; African Americans; Beecher Bible and Rifle Colony; Fugitive slaves; New Haven, Connecticut; Objects; Photographs and Illustrations; Platt, Enoch; Platt, Jireh; Platt, Luther H.; Underground railroad; Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory


Letter, James Montgomery to F. B. Sanborn
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: January 14, 1861
Just two weeks before Kansas would be admitted to the Union and in the midst of the early secession crisis, Montgomery (Mound City) told Franklin B. Sanborn (Boston) that he (Montgomery) did not favor an invasion of "the slave states so long as they keep themselves at home," but Missouri was crossing the line and interfering in Kansas affairs. He also commented on recent mob violence in Boston and General Harney's futile efforts to enforce the Fugitive Slave law in southern Kansas.

Keywords: Boston, Massachusetts; Democratic Party (U.S.); Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Harney, William S.; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Martial law; Missouri; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917; Secession; Slavery


Doy Rifle
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
Dr. John Doy used this Sharps rifle fighting border disputes in Franklin County and at Ft. Titus. In Jan. 1859, Doy was captured near Lawrence by pro-slavery Missouri forces and charged with aiding in the abduction of fugitive slaves. For six months Doy was held in a St. Joseph, MO, jail. Doy was rescued by ten of his free-state friends, lead by Major James Abbott. Engraved in the rifle's stock is the phase, "Successful Agent of the Irrepressible Conflict."

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Antislavery; Border disputes and warfare; Doy, John; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Objects; Sharps rifles; St. Joseph, Missouri; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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