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24 results for Firearms:
Walker Shotgun
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1854
Shotgun of Captain Samuel Walker, brought by him to Kansas in June, 1854, and used in the Battle of Fort Titus.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state cause; Guns; Objects; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, John Brown to Orson Day Esqr.
Authors: Brown, John , 1800-1859
Date: December 14, 1855
In mid-December 1855, John Brown wrote to Orson Day (a brother in law) of White Hall, New York, from Browns Station, Kansas Territory, regarding the "Kansas War" (Wakarusa War) from which he had "just returned." The territory was, according to Brown, "now entirely in the power of the Free State men," and he continued to "believe the Missourians will give up all further hope of making Kansas a Slave State."

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Browns Station, Kansas Territory; Firearms; Free state cause; Free state constitutions; Missourians; Proslavery prospects; Slaves in Kansas Territory; Topeka Constitution; Wakarusa War, November-December 1855


Photograph, Free-State Battery
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
During the year 1856, the pro-slavery people of Missouri virtually cut off free-state emigration to Kansas Territory by the way of the Missouri River. Numerous emigrant parties were intercepted and turned back. This circumstance led to an organized emigration to Kansas Territory overland through Iowa. Parties came in organized companies and were generally armed. These arms were furnished largely through organized movements in the Eastern states from which the emigrants came. In a number of instances cannons were brought by these emigrant parties. This daguerreotype shows one of the cannons brought by a company to Topeka in 1856.

Keywords: Cannons; Daguerreotypes; Firearms; Free State Battery; Free state; Free state activities; Free state militia; Guns; Photographs and Illustrations


Letters, by Thaddeus Hyatt (No. 3 and No. 4, incomplete)
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: 1856
These two excerpts of letters written by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, described the early workings of this committee and its work for the free state cause. Copy No. 3 discussed the "Tabernacle Committee" and the appropriation of side arms and Sharps rifles. Copy No. 4 referred to J.M. Winchell, authorizing him to make a withdrawal from the New York Kansas Fund. [The first page of the letters which is included in the text version was not scanned.]

Keywords: Firearms; Hyatt, Thaddeus; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Sharps rifles; Winchell, James M., 1823-1877


Poster, Public Warning!
Authors: Shockley, William P.
Date: June 11, 1856
This flyer warned the citizens of Leavenworth that the city marshal, William Shockley, would begin enforcing the ordinance against discharging firearms within the city limits. It had "become so frequent as to endanger life and greatly annoy the quiet and peace of orderly citizens."

Keywords: Cities and towns; Firearms; Guns; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Shockley, William P.


Receipts, Francis Tomes and Sons to Mr. T. Hyatt
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: August 22, 1856 - August 23, 1856
These two receipts, from Francis Tomes and Sons, New York, detail supplies acquired to benefit the free state cause. They include the prices of Bowie knives, Colt pistols, and other pieces pertaining to the use of firearms.

Keywords: Firearms; Guns; Hyatt, Thaddeus; National Kansas Committee; Receipts; Relief; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, M. C. Dickey to Mr. [Thaddeus] Hyatt
Authors: Dickey, Milton C.
Date: October 23, 1856
This letter to Thaddeus Hyatt of the National Kansas Committee, written by Milton Dickey from Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, informed Hyatt of Dickey's journey west. The author described the hardships endured by Kansas settlers, as well as the enthralling tale of a free state man who escaped from the prison at Lecompton.

Keywords: Cannons; Dickey, Milton C.; Donalson, Israel B.; Emigration and immigration; Firearms; Free state perspective; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Lecompton, Kansas Territory; Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; Prisoners; Prisons; Relief; Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885; Sharps rifles; Slavery; United States. Army


Letter, W. F. M. Arny to Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Arny, W F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881
Date: October 23, 1856
W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Chicago, Illinois; Clothing and dress; Economic conditions; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Election, Presidential, 1856; Firearms; Food; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Guns; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Illness; Kansas Central Committee; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Money; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Relief funds; Sickness (see Illness); Topeka, Kansas; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, M. Stowell to Dear [Thomas W.] Higginson
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: November 19, 1856
This letter from Martin Stowell, written from Nebraska City, was sent to Thomas Higginson to keep him apprised of business and financial affairs. He also included information about the other members of his emigrant party, including a Mr. Dunning, who continually asked Stowell for whiskey money. For the most part, the members of his company were employed and hard at work. Stowell also mentioned Eastern supporters such as Mr. Nightingale from Groton and Mr. Newell from Littleton. He wrote briefly concerning Orville Chester Brown, whose house was destroyed during the battle of Osawatomie.

Keywords: Alcoholic beverages; Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904; Businessmen; Dunning, John; Emigrant aid companies; Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Finance; Firearms; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Immigration and early settlement; Livestock; Settlement; Stowell, Martin


Testimonies of Nathaniel Parker, Horace L. Dunnell, Hinton S. Dunnell, Alexander MacArthur, James Hall, Jerome Hazen, and Charles Henry Caulkins
Authors: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: December 5, 1856 - December 7, 1856
These testimonies, presumably taken down on paper by Thaddeus Hyatt of the National Kansas Committee, include personal information about each settler, such as their age, occupation, etc., as well as their experiences in Kansas and their involvement in border warfare and skirmishes with pro-slavery settlers. Each account is descriptive and provides tremendous detail about their individual experiences. The testimonies of MacArthur, Hall, and Hazen are combined into one, with this group testimony split into two separate sections.

Keywords: Battles; Black Jack, Battle of; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Caulkins, Charles Henry; Cutter, Calvin M.; Dunnell, Hinton S.; Dunnell, Horace L.; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Guns; Hall, James; Harvey, James A.; Hazen, Jerome; Hickory Point, Battle of; Hoyt, David Starr; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Iowa; Iowa City, Iowa; Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy); Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; MacArthur, Alexander; Missouri River; Parker, Nathaniel; Prisoners; Prisons; Proslavery activities; Skirmishing; Violence; Walker, Samuel Douglas; Weapons (see also Guns); Weston, Missouri; Wounds and injuries


Letter, S. G. Howe to My Dear Sir [Thomas W. Higginson]
Authors: Howe, Samuel G.
Date: December 18, 1856
Samuel G. Howe, a member of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thomas Higginson, a supporter of John Brown and agent for the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee. The letter concerned a woman whom Higginson had called a "gentlemen" unknowingly. She had supplied the money for some pistols and had also contributed a great deal of money to the Kansas cause.

Keywords: Emigrant aid companies - Free state; Firearms; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee


Pro-slavery man's musket
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Flintlock musket carried by J. H. Meyer in 1856, while a member of the pro-slavery Kansas Terriorial Militia.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Firearms; Guns; Meyer, J. H.; Militia; Objects; Proslavery activities; Proslavery perspective; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, T. W. Carter to George L. Stearns
Authors: Carter, T. W.
Date: May 1, 1857
This is the first of three letters from T. W. Carter, agent for the Massachusetts Arms Company, Chicopee Falls, to George Luther Stearns, president of the Massachusetts State Kansas Committee and major personal backer of John Brown, regarding the shipment of 200 revolvers to Capt. Brown.

Keywords: Brown, John, 1800-1859; Carter, T. W.; Firearms; Massachusetts Arms Company; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Photograph, Marais des Cygnes Massacre
Authors: Chapin, John R.
Date: 1858
An illustration of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre in Linn County, Kansas Territory, copied from Beyond the Mississippi by Albert. D. Richardson, 1867. In May 1858, Missourians crossed the border and murdered five Free-State men. This massacre was generally viewed as the last major violent occurrence during the territorial period. The site of the massacre is now one of the Kansas State Historical Society's historic properties.

Keywords: Book illustrations; Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Firearms; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Marais des Cygnes Massacre; Massacres; Photographs and Illustrations; Proslavery activities; Violence; Violent deaths


Photograph, John Doy rescue party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son Charles left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859. They were then taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After this trial, his son Charles was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail he was freed by friends from Kansas on September 23, 1859. Two different ambrotypes showing the John Doy rescue party were digitized for the project. When you compared the images, you will find the men are standing in different positions.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Abolitionists; Ambrotypes; Antislavery movements; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Firearms; Free state activities; Free state cause; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Hay, George R.; Photographs and Illustrations; Pike, Joshua A.; Senix, Jacob; Simmons, Thomas; Soule, Silas Stillman


Photograph, John Doy rescue party
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son Charles left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859. They were then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After this trial Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail he was freed by friends from Kansas on September 23, 1859. Two different ambrotypes showing the John Doy rescue party were digitized for the project. When you compared the images, you will find the men are standing in different positions.

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Abolitionists; Ambrotypes; Antislavery movements; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Doy, Charles; Doy, John; Firearms; Free state activities; Free state cause; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Hay, George R.; Photographs and Illustrations; Pike, Joshua A.; Senix, Jacob; Simmons, Thomas; Soule, Silas Stillman


Letter, James [R. Mead] to Dear Father and Folks at home
Authors: Mead, James R.
Date: November 7, 1859
In this letter, James R. Mead wrote his family and friends about his first buffalo hunt. He had just recently returned from this adventure and apparently he was extremely successful, having killed 30 buffalo. He wrote a rather detailed description of a buffalo's appearance so his friends and family would have a mental picture of this magnificent animal. Mead also mentioned other wild animals, such as prairie dogs and rabbits, commenting on their plumpness.

Keywords: Bison; Firearms; Hunting; Kansas Frontier; Mead, James R.; Natural resources


Letter, Joseph Gardner to George L. Stearns
Authors: Gardner, Joseph
Date: May 29, 1860
Joseph Gardner, a free-state partisan of Douglas County and member of the Doy rescue party, wrote Stearns requesting firearms and ammunition as there were people in the vicinity of St. Joseph, Mo., who reportedly were preparing to "make war upon my house." Word had reportedly gone out that Gardner was "harboring fugitives" [fugitive slaves).

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Doy rescue and trial, 1859; Firearms; Fugitive slaves; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; St. Joseph, Missouri; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Underground railroad


Letter, Caleb S. Pratt to George L. Stearns
Authors: Pratt, Caleb S.
Date: May 30, 1860
Pratt, who seemed to have been acting as Stearns' agent in Lawrence at this time, wrote regarding the Joseph Gardner request for firearms. On his own initiative, Pratt "allowed him [Gardner] to take 7 Rifles and 4 sabres to his house with permission to use the same if necessary . . ." This was a temporary loan that awaited Stearns' endorsement.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Firearms; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Massachusetts State Kansas Committee; Pratt, Caleb S.; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867


Letter, Joseph Gardner to George L. Stearns
Authors: Gardner, Joseph
Date: June 9, 1860
From Lawrence, Kansas, Joseph Gardner described one of the last battles of the border war. The attack Gardner had feared came "last night between 12 & 1." With the arms Stearns had made available, the attackers were repulsed, but "one of my [Gardner's] colored men, who had fought most nobly," took "a tremendous charge of buck shot" and died. His last words were "fight, fight hard!!"

Keywords: African Americans; Battles; Border ruffians; Clinton, Kansas Territory; Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Firearms; Fugitive slaves; Gardner, Joseph; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Washington Creek, Kansas Territory


Letter, James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Authors: Montgomery, James , 1814-1871
Date: November 27, 1860
From Mound City, James Montgomery wrote Stearns about recent trouble at Fort Scott and acting governor George M. Beebe's visit. He came, according to Montgomery, to ascertain for himself if the rumors about Montgomery's activities were correct. He left satisfied that the free staters were acting properly and "promising to do what he could to reform abuses" in the federal courts and protect their rights. Although things were quiet at present and Montgomery mentioned the arrival of more fugitive slaves, who could now stay safely in Kansas, he warned that the introduction of federal troops into southern Kansas would create an explosive situation.

Keywords: Beebe, George Monroe; Bowie knife; Democratic Party (U.S.); Firearms; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Jennison, Charles Ransford, 1834-1884; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Linn County, Kansas Territory; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Mound City, Kansas Territory; Sharps rifles; Stearns, Geo. L. (George Luther), 1809-1867; Whitman, E. B.


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear General [James H. Lane]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: January 25, 1861
In this "Private" reply to his political rival, Ewing apparently responded to a request from Jim Lane for information about troops and munitions at Fort Leavenworth. Ewing provided some detailed information about this and about the local militia's readiness and strength. The troop strength at the fort was weak, but "Dragoons" from Fort Scott were expected soon: "If the Cavalry Companies come, all will be safe at the Fort. But we must have a force prepared to defend the City--& such preparation is our best guaranty for peace with our neighbors.

Keywords: Ammunition; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Firearms; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Fort Scott, Kansas Territory; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Military; Militia; United States. Army


J.W.H. Golden Rifle
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1862
Rifle made by J.W.H. Golden while superintendent of the Fort Leavenworth Arsenal, 1862. Golden settled in Leavenworth in October, 1854 and was shot by border ruffians near Tonganoxie on September 6, 1856. The bullet remained in his throat until his death in 1894.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Border ruffians; Firearms; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Golden, J.W.H.; Guns; Objects; Weapons (see also Guns)


Doy Rifle
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1859
Dr. John Doy used this Sharps rifle fighting border disputes in Franklin County and at Ft. Titus. In Jan. 1859, Doy was captured near Lawrence by pro-slavery Missouri forces and charged with aiding in the abduction of fugitive slaves. For six months Doy was held in a St. Joseph, MO, jail. Doy was rescued by ten of his free-state friends, lead by Major James Abbott. Engraved in the rifle's stock is the phase, "Successful Agent of the Irrepressible Conflict."

Keywords: Abbott, James Burnett; Antislavery; Border disputes and warfare; Doy, John; Firearms; Fort Titus, Battle of; Franklin County, Kansas Territory; Fugitive Slave Law; Fugitive slaves; Guns; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Missourians; Objects; Sharps rifles; St. Joseph, Missouri; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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This file was last modified September 12 2013 04:09:26 PM.