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10 results for English Bill:
Letter, R. S. Stevens to My Dear Sir [Governor James W. Denver]
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 25, 1858
Robert S. Stevens, writing from Washington, D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, reported that Congress had passed the English Bill, which essentially resubmitted the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Stevens predicted that Kansans would vote against it and that Kansas' admission as a state would be delayed until at least 1860. Stevens commented that legislators in Washington failed to understand "the real situation in Kansas," particularly the strength of the antislavery group in the territory.

Keywords: Denver, James William, 1817-1892; English Bill; Lecompton Constitution; Popular sovereignty; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Stevens, Robert S.; United States. Congress


Letter, Galusha A. Grow to Gov. C. Robinson
Authors: Grow, Galusha Aaron
Date: May 5, 1858
Congressman Galusha Aaron Grow, a Pennsylvania Republican, wrote Robinson regarding the Lecompton debate and the need to get a large free state vote against that proposed constitution. If it were "the dough faces will be exterminated next fall."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election fraud; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; English Bill; Grow, Galusha Aaron; Lecompton Constitution; Proslavery supporters; United States. Congress


Letter, [C. Robinson] to "My Dear Sir" [Henry Wilson]
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: May 12, 1858
This important document is reportedly a copy of a letter from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, May 12, 1858, to Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson in which the Kansas governor expresses confidence that the Lecompton Constitution will be overwhelmingly defeated in the upcoming election and makes numerous observations about the state of politics--present and future--in Kansas. Robinson believed that half the Democrats would oppose the Lecompton instrument because they knew that freestaters would dominate any state government that would be admitted under it and subsequently "the Constitution would be changed in the 'twinkling of an eye.'" Thus, he predicted no Kansas admission until at least December 1859, and in the meantime expected Democrats to "take the lead in aiding in developing the resources of Kansas, & [the Democratic Party] will claim to be the special friends of our infant State."

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; Election, Lecompton Constitution, August 1857; English Bill; Factionalism; Free State Party; Free state supporters; Journals; Lecompton Constitution; Partisan press; Press and politics; Press and propaganda; Proslavery supporters; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress; Wilson, Henry, 1812-1875


Letter, S.T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: June 9, 1858
S.T. Learnard wrote from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son, Oscar Learnard of Kansas Territory, in this transcribed version of his letter. S.T. mentioned his recent trip to Illinois and his efforts to obtain land warrants. He also requested that Oscar send him word on the status of his crops and mill, as his own friends were urging him to stay in business in Vermont. The author also referred to the upcoming August vote in which the English Bill, which essentially re-submitted the once-rejected proslavey Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory, would be approved or rejected by popular sovereignty.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Business enterprises; Daily life; English Bill; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lecompton Constitution; National politics; Vermont


Letter, J. Thompson to His Excellency J. W. Denver
Authors: Doniphan, J.
Date: June 21, 1858
J. Thompson wrote to his friend, James W. Denver, from the U.S. Department of the Interior regarding Denver's service as governor of Kansas Territory. Thompson briefly discussed possible candidates for appointment to the Kansas Agency, then proceeded to praise Denver at length for his good leadership of Kansas Territory, and he assured him that he had national support for his efforts. Thompson told Denver that the among the States, their party was divided over the Lecompton Constitution, but he hoped that the English Bill would allow that Constitution to be voted on again.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Denver, James William, 1817-1892; Doniphan, J.; English Bill; Indian Affairs, Commissioner of; Mix, Charles E.; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; United States. Commissioner of Indian Affairs


Letter, H. F. Parker to Mr. Hiram Hill
Authors: Parker, Henry F.
Date: August 25, 1858
Henry Parker wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Parker described the situation in K.T. as "dull. . .every man you se [sic] here Looks blue and no Business and allmost [sic] Every Family are Sick". He told Hill that the Cincinnati House was the only property of his that was occupied, all other of Hill's homes and buildings were vacant; many people were selling their property. Parker closed his letter with a mention of the recent election to ratify the Lecompton Constitution under the English bill.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; English Bill; Finance; Hill, Hiram; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Parker, Henry F.


Letter, A. C. Morton to Mr. Hill
Authors: Morton, Albert C.
Date: August 3, 1858
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton had recently returned to Quindaro in order to vote on the Lecompton Constitution as submitted by the English bill. Having arrived there, he found the place to be "dull". Morton described many empty houses and buildings, left behind from settlers selling out to return home; money had also been lost in investments and bridges were washed out in floods. However, the Town Company had invested in a flour mill, which had commenced operations. Morton also discussed matters of buying and selling land warrants with Hill.

Keywords: Douglas County, Kansas Territory; Economic conditions; Election, Lecompton Constitution ratification, August 1858; English Bill; Hill, Hiram; Lecompton Constitution; Morton, Albert C.; Quindaro, Kansas Territory; Real estate investment; Voting


Letter, Samuel C. [Smith] to "Dear Dr." [C. Robinson]
Authors: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 7, 1858
In this letter, also from Lawrence, Smith went into some detail about developments with respect to the Delaware lands, apparently connected to a railroad promotion scheme. The Indians "know that [Robert S.] Stevens is connected with the R. R. enterprise and this action of his . . . Has excited their mistrust and caused obstacles to rise in the way of such a treaty as you [Robinson] desire."

Keywords: Delaware Indian lands, Kansas Territory; Delaware Indians; English Bill; Indian treaties; Miller, Josiah; Pratt, J. G. (John Gill), 1814-1900; Railroad promotion; Railroads finance; Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; Smith, Samuel C.; Stanton, Frederick Perry, 1814-1894; Stevens, Robert S.


Speech, Fellow Citizens--Opposing the Lecompton Constitution
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: c. 1858
This hand-written speech appeared to be another by John Alexander Martin, seemingly composed for delivery in the spring and/or early summer of 1858, not long after he took over Atchison's Squatter Sovereign and renamed it Freedom's Champion. Here the speaker aimed his attack at the Buchanan administration and the English Bill, and the renewed attempt to pass the Lecompton Constitution at a referendum scheduled for August 2, 1858, and thus overturn the free-state victory that had already been won. The speaker seemed confident it would be defeated, as the constitution itself had been in January but hoped for an overwhelming vote against (perhaps as many as 15,000).

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Constitutions; English Bill; Free labor; Lecompton Constitution; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Missouri compromise; Popular sovereignty; Slave power; Slavery; Squatter sovereignty


Speech, Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: c. July 1859
This eleven-page document was a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution, which was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention which finished its work at the end of July. Thus, this speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat this latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September 1859. It covered the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat it at the polls and stressed that in light of actions of "a servile judiciary" slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."

Keywords: Buchanan administration; Constitutions; Democratic Party (U.S.); English Bill; Free state constitutions; Kansas Territory. Supreme Court; Lecompton Constitution; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Missouri compromise; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Scott, Dred; Slave power; Slavery; Squatter sovereignty; Wyandotte Constitution; Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July 1859


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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