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14 results for Election, Presidential, 1860:
Lombard Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1858
Students of Lombard College at Galesburg, Illinois, presented this banner to Abraham Lincoln on October 7, 1858. Lincoln's fifth debate with Stephen A. Douglas was held at Galesburg that evening. Lincoln later presented the banner to Mark W. Delahay of Leavenworth, who was related to Lincoln by marriage. Delahay used the banner in the 1860 presidential election.

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Elections; Flags and banners; Illinois; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lombard College; Objects


Letter, Amos A. Lawrence to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 19, 1858
The benefactor of the city of Lawrence and much free-state activity generally, wrote Robinson from Boston, Mass., on several issues, including the establishment of a college and business/financial matters, but he made interesting reference to his (Lawrence's) own candidacy for governor on the American Party ticket. He did not expect to win, but instead proposed to simply be working to keep the "Americans" in line for a unified opposition to the Democrats in 1860.

Keywords: American Party; Boston, Massachusetts; Democratic Party (U.S.); Education; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Letter, A. Lincoln (copy) to M. W. Delahay
Authors: Lincoln, Abraham
Date: May 14, 1859
This two-page, handwritten copy of a letter to Mark Delahay from Abraham Lincoln was probably given to the KSHS by Delahay's daughter Mary E. Delahay in the early 1900s. Lincoln regretfully declined an invitation to attend the Osawatomie convention on May 18 which was to formally organize the Republican Party in Kansas. Lincoln warned against "the temptation to lower the Republican Standard [in whatever platform the convention might adopt] in order to gather recruits. In my judgment," Lincoln continued," such a step would be a serious mistake" that "would surrender the object of the Republican organization--the preventing the Spread and Nationalization of Slaver . . ."

Keywords: Delahay, Mark W.; Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Slave power; Slavery


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Vernon [Thomas Vernon]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: February 23, 1860
Along with a request that his friend Thomas Vernon purchase a list of used books for him in New York City, Ewing commented on the presidential nomination and the fact that the Republicans were "not so extensively engaged in preaching the irrepressible conflict as before John Browns day." Ewing hoped the party picked someone "at least as moderate" as Abraham Lincoln, whom he "could heartily support."

Keywords: Bates, Edward, 1793-1869; Brown, John, 1800-1859; Election, Presidential, 1860; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; New York, New York; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Vernon, Thomas


Letter, R. S. Stevens to S. N. Wood
Authors: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 2, 1860
R. S. Stevens, a Democratic attorney who had a variety of financial interests in Kansas during the 1850s and 1860s, wrote this letter to Wood from Washington, D.C., where he (Stevens) seemed to be lobbying for a number of concessions for himself and Kansas Territory. Specifically, he wrote of mail routes and "grants for R Rr" [railroads], which would not be forthcoming because of the Republicans who "care[d] nothing about us [Kansas] except so far as political capital can be made." Much of the letter is a condemnation of the Republican Party, which he also wrote was holding up Kansas admission so it could be used against the Democrats, and the final page addressed action, or inaction, with regard to Indian treaties and land.

Keywords: Admission, Kansas (see also Statehood); Brown, John, 1800-1859; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Indian lands; Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879; Railroad land grants; Railroads; Republican National Convention (1860 : Chicago, Ill.); Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Stevens, Robert S.; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt); Wyandotte Constitution


Letter, Findley Patterson to John A. Halderman
Authors: Patterson, Findlay
Date: April 4, 1860
Patterson, the land office receiver at Junction City, May 1858 to April 1861, wrote with regard to problems within the Kansas Democratic Party. Recent differences between members over participation in the party's national convention at Charleston, S.C., had been aired in the press, and Patterson thought this unfortunate since "the future prosperity of our country depends upon the success of that party. Democrats should, he contended, not let relatively small policy issues overshadow the fundamental principles they share. Patterson pledged his support for the nominee of the convention, whomever it was, but favored "Judge Douglass [Stephen Douglas] . . .as we have been intimate personal, as well as political friends for several years."

Keywords: Davis County, Kansas Territory; Democratic National Convention (1860 : Charleston, S.C.); Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Geary County, Kansas; Halderman, John Adams; Junction City, Kansas Territory; Newspapers; Patterson, Findlay; United States. General Land Office


Letter, John McCannon to [James Montgomery]
Authors: McCannon, John
Date: May 1860
John McCannon, writing from Denver City, K. T., a location that is currently in Colorado, described the killing of a man named Akins. McCannon claimed that Akins was killed by pro-slavery supporters. McCannon also commented favorably upon the Republican Party's nomination of Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate.

Keywords: Akins, (?); Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory; Casualties; Colorado; Denver City, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; McCannon, John; Montgomery, James, 1814-1871; Violent deaths


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Charley [Charley Ewing]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: May 1, 1860
In a letter to Charley Ewing, his younger brother, Thomas Ewing made some interesting observations about national presidential politics and parties. He was hopeful that the Republican Party in convention at Chicago would nominate a good "National man," but if they didn't he would "hope for the election of [Stephen A.] Douglas."

Keywords: Charleston, South Carolina; Chicago, Illinois; Democratic Party (U.S.); Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861; Election, Presidential, 1860; Ewing, Charles; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Political conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Whig Party (U.S.)


Letter, Tho. Ewing Jr to Dear Sir [Abraham Lincoln]
Authors: Ewing, Jr., Thomas , 1829-1896
Date: May 6, 1860
On May 6, 1860, ten days before the Republican convention convened in Chicago, Illinois, Ewing wrote to Abraham Lincoln at Springfield, Ill., regarding the fact that the Kansas Republican delegation had been "instructed by the Convention by which they were selected to cast their votes (if they should have any) for Mr. Seward [considered by most a more radical candidate]. . ." Ewing wanted to explain how this happened and why D.W. Wilder, a strong Seward man, was the Leavenworth delegate rather than "Col. Delahay who was understood to be strongly in favor of your nomination."

Keywords: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873; Chicago, Illinois; Delahay, Mark W.; Election, Presidential, 1860; Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896; Illinois; Leavenworth County, Kansas Territory; Leavenworth, Kansas Territory; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Political conventions; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911


Letter, Geo. W. Deitzler to Friend [Samuel N.] Wood
Authors: Deitzler, George W.
Date: August 18, 1860
In the wake of Abraham Lincoln's nomination, May 16, 1860, as the Republican presidential nominee, Deitzler wrote from Lawrence that Mark W. Delahay had gone to Springfield, Illinois, on behalf of "our Gen'l J. H. Lane," and the latter was going East soon, "to howl frightfully against Democracy & in favor of 'Old Abe' & so secure, if possible, the confidence of that good man." Deitzler was worried about the new administration, if it was to be controlled by the likes of Lane and Delahay. On another subject, in behalf of a friend, Deitzler asked about the new territorial divorce law, and Wood's availability to handle such a case "in a quiet way."

Keywords: Deitzler, George W.; Delahay, Mark W.; Divorce law and legislation; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866; Lincoln administration; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)


Letter, S. T. Learnard to Dear Son [Oscar Learnard]
Authors: Learnard, S. T.
Date: November 6, 1860
S. T. Learnard, a farmer and occasional state legislator from Bakersfield, Vermont, wrote his "Kansas" son frequently and complained that replies from Kansas were far too scarce. In this letter, S.T. Learnard commented on suffering in the territory, presumably from drought, and his hope that the national election would eliminate "her troubles from one source." He complimented the "brave men and women" of Kansas for their "suffering and endurance in the Cause of Liberty," and expressed confidence that Abraham Lincoln, who did well in Bakersfield, would win New York.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Bakersfield, Vermont; Droughts; Election, Presidential, 1860; Learnard, Oscar E., 1832-1911; Learnard, S. T.; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865


Letter, J. W. Robinson to Dear Friend [Isaac] Goodnow
Authors: Robinson, John W.
Date: November 12, 1860
John W. Robinson wrote from his home in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow. Robinson had given Goodnow agency to sell some of his Manhattan properties, and thanked him for his assistance as he was in great need of money. Robinson enthusiastically reacted to Lincoln's recent election to the Presidency, and claimed "even the Democrats assert that they are gratified at the result." He believed Kansas would be admitted to statehood early in the Legislative session. Robinson also discussed Manhattan's recent development projects, including new roads and a pontoon bridge.

Keywords: Bridges; Election, Presidential, 1860; Lincoln administration; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Medicine; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Roads; Robinson, John W.; Town development


Letter, John W. Robinson to Hon. J. M. S. Williams
Authors: Robinson, John W.
Date: November 15, 1860
John W. Robinson wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory to John M. S. Williams. Robinson thanked Williams for his $25 donation to the relief fund for Kansans suffering from the effects of drought.

Keywords: Droughts; Election, Presidential, 1860; Manhattan, Kansas Territory; Relief; Riley County, Kansas Territory; Robinson, John W.; Williams, John M. S.


Letter, James [Mead] to My dear Father
Authors: Mead, James R.
Date: December 1, 1860
James Mead, a rancher and trader from Saline County, Kansas Territory, wrote this letter to his father, who lived in Davenport, Iowa. Mead and his companions were going to "the river" to send a load of buffalo meat and buffalo robes to the folks back home. He also spoke of a trading excursion he had taken recently to a Kaw Indian camp about twenty miles from his trading post, listing the goods that were traded. Although other settlers were suffering during the drought of 1860, Mead and those in the vicinity were faring quite well. He once again mentioned Lincoln's election and inquired about whether or not "the Union is dissolved."

Keywords: Bison; Business enterprises; Droughts; Election, Presidential, 1860; Food; Indian traders; Kansa Indians; Mead, James R.; Prices; Saline County, Kansas Territory; Saline River, Kansas Territory


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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