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20 results for Election, Presidential, 1856:
Letter, [anonymous/unsigned] to General Samuel C. Pomeroy
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: May 14, 1855
The author of this length epistle, chose not to sign his name but offered his observations about Kansas affairs "which may or may not be of service to you." In essence the correspondent offers a free staters perspective--not an abolitionist one--on the "modus operandi" of the pro-slave party for KT. Slavery, or the slave system, meant "despotism" to this individual, and he believed "pro slavery men will use every means" to control the territory, which would soon go to free state "if the contest were a fair and even one." It was critical that Americans elect a president in 1856 who would "do right, a man who loves the Union the whole Union as it is . . . ."

Keywords: Despotism; Election, Presidential, 1856; Free state; New England Emigrant Aid Company; Proslavery; Slave power


Letter, N. P. Banks to Gov. [Charles] Robinson
Authors: Banks, Nathaniel Prentice, 1816-1894
Date: March 19, 1856
U. S. Congressman Nathaniel P. Banks of Massachusetts wrote Robinson from Washington on March 19, 1856, to forward John Fremont's letter (see document, #101103) and to encourage that letter's publication in Kansas Territory. The newly elected speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives believed Fremont was a good friend of Kansas and that he would make a solid, electable candidate for president. Banks also wrote that he was "hopeful the Kansas question will meet its first decision in the House this week." He was confident something positive would be done for the cause. (Perhaps he was speaking of the Howard Committee, which was authorized that very day.)

Keywords: Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894; Congressional Report 200 (see also Howard Committee); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Kansas question; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894; United States. Congress. House; Washington, D.C.


Letter, Jonathan Watson[,] J. H. Baker[,] Thos. S. Chase [&] E. H. Chase to Col. C. K. Holliday
Authors: Baker, J. H.; Chase, E. H.; Chase, Thos. S.; Watson, Jonathan
Date: July 29, 1856
This letter, sent by a Republican Party caucus committee in Titusville, Pennsylvania, requested that Cyrus K. Holliday speak at a convention in August. They described a local political shift, as Democrats agreed to support the Republican presidential nominee. Cyrus already had left Topeka on July 7th, intending to bring his wife, Mary, and daughter, Lillie, to Kansas Territory. Responding to invitations such as this, Cyrus spoke about 130 times on behalf of the Republican presidential candidate, John Charles Fremont, who supported admittance of Kansas as a free state. Though speaking mostly in Pennsylvania, Cyrus saw little of his family until after the November election, which Fremont lost.

Keywords: Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Pennsylvania; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Speeches, addresses, etc.


Letter, Marian S. Hand to Dear Bro & Sister, [Samuel and Florella Adair] note added by T. W. Hand
Authors: Hand, Marian S.
Date: July 7, 1856
Marian Brown Hand, Rawsonville, Ohio, wrote her sister Florella Adair and brother-in-law Samuel Adair inquiring about events in Kansas and John Brown and his sons. She said the Kansas Aid Societies and Ladies Aid Societies were forming to help families that suffered in Kansas Territory. Her husband added to the end of the letter discussing politics. He felt that Fremont would be elected President and that would insure freedom in Kansas and the North.

Keywords: Adair, Florella Brown; Adair, Samuel Lyle; Antislavery perspective; Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Hand, Marian S.; Hand, T. W.; Ohio; Rawsonville, Ohio; Relief; Women


Letter, C. Robinson, Camp Sacket, to Hon. J. C. Fremont
Authors: Robinson, Charles
Date: July 28, 1856
While a prisoner at Camp Sackett near Lecompton, Robinson informed Fremont that James Emery was traveling east and should be used in Fremont's presidential campaign as a stump speaker as he "can do good service to the cause." Robinson also indicated that he did not know if the Pierce administration had decided whether or not to hang Robinson and his fellow prisoners.

Keywords: Camp Sackett, Kansas Territory; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Emery, James Stanley; Free state cause; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869; Prisoners; Prisons; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894


Fremont Campaign Ribbon
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: July 30, 1856
Kansas was a major issue in the 1856 presidential election. John C. Fremont was the candidate of the newly formed Republican Party, which wanted Kansas admitted as a free state. This silk ribbon is printed with an image of Fremont, and the text, "Let Freedom Conquer! . . . For President, John C. Fremont, of California. Vice President, Wm. L. Dayton of New Jersey. Young Men's Convention, Dayton, O. July 30th, 1856."

Keywords: Dayton, William Lewis; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Objects; Ohio; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Letter, W. W. Updegraff to William Hutchinson
Authors: Updegraff, W. W.
Date: August 5, 1856
W. W. Updegraff, writing from Osawatomie, KT, described pro-slavery forces stealing horses from free state supporters, the need of free state settlers in the Osawatomie area for financial assistance, and his views on the potential for war in the event of John C. Fremont's election as president in the November 1856 election.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Horse stealing; Hutchinson, William, 1823-1904; Lykins County, Kansas Territory (see also Miami County, Kansas); Miami County, Kansas (see also Lykins County, Kansas Territory); Osawatomie, Kansas Territory; Proslavery; Relief; Updegraff, W. W.


Letter, Wm Morris Davis to My dear Sir [Cyrus K. Holliday]
Authors: Davis, William Morris
Date: August 29, 1856
William Morris Davis wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory, although Holliday was speaking in Pennsylvania in support of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Davis praised Holliday's efforts, for he saw both Fremont's election to the presidency and the free statehood of Kansas as steps toward the end of slavery. Williard Filmore, Know-Nothing candidate, had hopeless prospects, and Democrat James Buchanan would be rejected by the masses protesting the current administration, Davis claimed. This letter uses exalted, militant, and religious language to describe territorial and national conflict. Davis also mentioned William Y. Robers (lieutenant governor under the Topeka Constitution), Burlingame, and Cobb.

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Davis, William Morris; Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Philadelpia, Pennsylvania; Roberts, William Young; Slavery; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874; Topeka, Kansas Territory


Broadside, "Fremont & Dayton Meeting"
Authors: Buffalo City Town Association
Date: September 11, 1856
This broadside advertised a meeting of "the friends of Fremont and Dayton, and all opposed to the Cincinnati Platform and the extension of Slavery into Free Kansas". John C. Fremont was the newly-formed Republican party's candidate for the Presidency in 1856; William L. Lewis was his running mate. The pair favored admitting Kansas to the Union as a free state, but did not support the Cincinnati Platform, which would put the issue of slavery to a popular vote in Kansas Territory.

Keywords: Cincinnati Platform; Dayton, William Lewis; Election, Presidential, 1856; Free state supporters; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Letter, Thaddeus Hyatt to Wm. Barnes
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: September 14, 1856
Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to urge William Barnes, secretary of the New York State Kansas Committee, to do everything in his power to provide aid to Kansas as quickly as possible.

Keywords: Barnes, William, 1824-1913; Election, Presidential, 1856; Free state support; Hyatt, Thaddeus; National Kansas Committee; New York State Kansas Committee


Letter, A. S. Harris to Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Harris, A S.
Date: September 22, 1856
A.S. Harris wrote from New York to Thaddeus Hyatt regarding an article in the Journal of Commerce that dealt with the upcoming Presidential election and the strife in Kansas. The article included a rather lengthy attack on emigrant aid societies.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Emigrant aid companies; Emigration and immigration; Free state perspective; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Kansas question; United States. Constitution


Letter, S. N. Simpson to Hiram Hill Esqr
Authors: Simpson, Samuel Newell
Date: October 3, 1856
Samuel Simpson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill, reporting that he had done no business since the Battle of Franklin, early the past June, until the last few days. Hill's homes were all paying rent, and Simpson was taking steps to get a road built through West Lawrence. Simpson had received money sent by Hill and passed it on to Osawatomie to help them recover from the battle of the previous August. He continued to hope for the election of Fremont, and described conditions in the military camps.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Franklin, Battle of; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Hill, Hiram; Military; Simpson, Samuel Newell; Titus, Henry Theodore; Town development; Voting


Letter, R. P. Bourn to Dear Sir [Franklin Crane]
Authors: Bourn, R. P.
Date: October 18, 1856
R. P. Bourn, writing from Nicholasville, Kentucky, addressed this letter to Franklin Crane of Topeka. Bourn discussed politics both in Kansas and at the national level, including the Presidential election of 1860. He made his anti slavery beliefs clear.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Democratic Party (U.S.); Election, Presidential, 1856; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- ); Slavery


Letter, A. H. Reeder to My Dear Sir [John A. Halderman]
Authors: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: October 22, 1856
Former Governor A. H. Reeder wrote to Halderman from Easton, Pennsylvania, regarding his business affairs and his desire to have Halderman act as his attorney and agent. But in this letter, Reeder also gave brief attention to the political situation in Kansas Territory and the nation, mentioning the congressional committee investigating the Kansas affairs, the "horrible state of things . . .in our unfortunate Territory," and his belief that, although James Buchanan would win the presidential contest in 1856, "the Republican party is bound to sweep the North within the next four years."

Keywords: Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Business; Congressional Report 200 (see also Howard Committee); Election, Presidential, 1856; Halderman, John Adams; Howard Committee (see also Congressional Report 200); Leases; Pennsylvania; Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


Letter, W. F. M. Arny to Dear Sir [Thaddeus Hyatt]
Authors: Arny, W F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881
Date: October 23, 1856
W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

Keywords: Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881; Border ruffians; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Chicago, Illinois; Clothing and dress; Economic conditions; Eldridge, Shalor Winchell, 1816-1899; Election, Presidential, 1856; Firearms; Food; Free state militia; Free state perspective; Geary, John White, 1819-1873; Guns; Hyatt, Thaddeus; Illness; Kansas Central Committee; Lawrence, Kansas Territory; Money; National Kansas Committee; Relief; Relief funds; Sickness (see Illness); Topeka, Kansas; Violence; Weapons (see also Guns)


Letter, M. Stowell to My Dear Friend [Thomas Wentworth Higginson]
Authors: Stowell, Martin
Date: October 27, 1856
This letter, written by Martin Stowell from Nebraska City, was addressed to Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Stowell and other members of his company from Massachusetts had been driven out of Kansas. Fortunately, none of them had been placed under arrest. Stowell had just returned from Lexington, Kansas Territory and he had "left Brown there in as comfortable circumstances as I could." The identity of this man is unclear. The "Plymouth men" in Lexington had stolen their flour and tools which they had hidden in a neighbor's haystack. Stowell inquired about the news revolving around the upcoming Presidential election and other news from the East.

Keywords: Border disputes and warfare; Election, Presidential, 1856; Emigration and immigration; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 1823-1911; Lexington Township, Kansas Territory; Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory; Nebraska Territory; Stowell, Martin


Letter, C. K. Holliday to My Dear Dr. [Franklin Crane]
Authors: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: November 14, 1856
The letter, written by Cyrus Holliday from Meadville, Pennsylvania, discusses the results of the 1856 Presidential election and its anticipated impact on the Kansas issue. Holliday describes to Franklin Crane, a prominent Topeka doctor, a meeting in Boston where he was encouraged to make Kansas a free state. Many of those present at the meeting were influential figures in emigrant aid companies. The letter also discusses efforts to make Nicaragua a slave state in order to achieve a compromise with the South. In addition, Holliday mentions making speeches on behalf of John C. Fremont and Kansas.

Keywords: Antislavery perspective; Boston, Massachusetts; Buchanan, James, 1791-1868; Crane, Franklin Loomis; Election, Presidential, 1856; Emigrant aid companies; Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900; Meadville, Pennsylvania; Slavery


Speech, The Progress of Tyranny
Authors: Martin, John A., 1839-1889
Date: December 10, 1856
This "essay," presumably by John Alexander Martin, was "Read before the 'Franklin Literary Institute,' of Brownsville [Pennsylvania], Dec. 10th 1856," about a year before Martin moved to Kansas Territory. It was an interesting statement of the young journalist's emerging philosophy on many of the troubling questions of the day, including a discussion of their historical context. According to the "essayist," America's early opponents of "tyrany," both Northern and Southern, "looked forward to the day when it [slavery] would be abolished," and he pointed to the Constitutions and the Ordinance of 1787 as proof "that the founders of the Republic, in all their acts, strove to circumscribe the limits of slavery, and extend the area of Freedom." Subsequent generations of Americans placed greater emphasis on the economic value of slave production and the current generation was aggressively advocating its expansion and taking whatever action was necessary to insure the institution's survival and continue "the march of tyrany."

Keywords: Bleeding Kansas; Crime Against Kansas; Election, Presidential, 1856; Fugitive Slave Law; Kansas Nebraska Act; Martin, John A., 1839-1889; Missouri compromise; Ordinance of 1787 (see United States. Ordinance of 1787); Slave power; Slavery; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874; United States. Ordinance of 1787


Admit Me Free Flag
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
In 1856 this flag was used in a rally at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for Republican presidential nominee John C. Fremont. The oversized 34th star and the words, "Admit Me Free" in the canton of the flag are in support of Kansas admittance as a free state.

Keywords: Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Flags and banners; Free state; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; Objects; Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


"God Save Kansas" Banner
Authors: No authors specified.
Date: 1856
Banner used in New Hampshire during the 1856 presidential campaign, illustrating the national interest in Kansas territorial affairs. Fremont/Dayton banner was made of silk and used at Lancaster, N.H. Inscribed "God Save Kansas" and "From the ladies of Lancaster to Fremont Club No. 244."

Keywords: Dayton, William Lewis; Election, Presidential, 1856; Elections; Flags and banners; Free state cause; Free state supporters; Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890; New Hampshire; Objects; Republican Party (U.S.: 1854- )


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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